Impact of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in High-Risk Patients

Abstract Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Obstructive sleep apnea is a highly prevalent condition characterized by repetitive upper airway collapse during sleep. A large body of evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the current gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. CPAP devices maintain upper airway patency using a pneumatic splint, thereby ameliorating the repetitive deoxygenation and reoxygenation characteristic of sleep in obstructive sleep apnea patients. Accumulating evidence suggests that CPAP treatment may lead to a reduction in blood pressure. Limited evidence also suggests that CPAP therapy may modulate glucose metabolism, serum cholesterol levels, and inflammatory biomarkers. Thus, CPAP treatment may be associated with cardiovascular risk factor modification in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, who are often obese and at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This review updates the knowledge on the effects of CPAP on cardiovascular risk factors from recently published randomized trials.
Source: Current Atherosclerosis Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Conclusions Aging leads to a progressive decrease in androgen production that, in turn, leads to the development of LOH, defined by significant low T serum levels (in the lowest quartile) in the presence of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism (51). LOH could be due to both testicular and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (32), and ED is one of its main symptoms. ED in LOH is linked to increased oxidative stress, subclinical inflammation, and subsequent endothelial dysfunction (101). In elderly men, it has been shown that LOH is also linked to lower cAMP pool and to an alteration of the cGMP signaling pathway. PDE5 gene l...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Annals of Thoracic Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent sleep disorder characterized by upper airway obstruction during sleep, resulting in breathing pauses, intermittent hypoxia, and fragmented sleep. In parallel, the constellation of adverse health outcomes associated with prolonged obesity, such as insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, triglycerides, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol – termed metabolic syndrome –raises the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality.
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Review Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a complex sleep disorder associated with autonomic and sympathetic dysregulation. To the contrary, catestatin, an endogenous pleiotropic peptide cleaved from chromogranin A, is known for its inhibitory effects on catecholamine release and sympathetic activity. The aims of the study were to determine catestatin serum levels among male OSA patients compared to healthy control subjects and to explore associations of catestatin with anthropometric, polysomnographic, and lipid profile parameters. METHODS: Seventy-eight male OSA patients aged 50.3 ±&t...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a complex sleep disorder associated with autonomic and sympathetic dysregulation. To the contrary, catestatin, an endogenous pleiotropic peptide cleaved from chromogranin A, is known for its inhibitory effects on catecholamine release and sympathetic activity. The aims of the study were to determine catestatin serum levels among male OSA patients compared to healthy control subjects and to explore associations of catestatin with anthropometric, polysomnographic, and lipid profile parameters.MethodsSeventy-eight male OSA patients aged 50.3  ± 8.8 year...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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Source: Ethnicity and Disease - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ethn Dis Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn nondiabetic OSA patients, plasma SFRP5 is associated with the lipid profile. However, no correlation was observed between SFRP5 and FBG or sleep parameters. The SFRP5 level of OSA patients did not differ from that of non-OSA individuals in our study.
Source: Chinese Medical Sciences Journal - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
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