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The week in wildlife – in pictures
Herons in flight, an inquisitive marmot and a blue whale are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Here be dragons: the million-year journey of the Komodo dragon | Hanneke Meijer
Far from being the special result of insular evolution, Komodo dragons are the last survivors of a group of huge lizards that ranged over much of AustralasiaIn 1910, Lieutenant Jacques Karel Henri van Steyn van Hensbroek was stationed onFloresIsland in eastern Indonesia within the Dutch colonial administration, when he received word of a “land crocodile” of unusually large size living on the nearby island ofKomodo. Intrigued, he set out to Komodo to investigate for himself. He returned with a photo and the skin of the animal, which he sent to Pieter Ouwens, then director of the Java Zoological Museum and Botani...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Science Evolution Fossils Biology Source Type: news

Alberta museum unveils world's best-preserved armoured dinosaur
Fossil of 18ft nodosaur found in 2011 in Alberta ’s tar sands goes on display after 7,000 hours of reconstruction workIt has been compared to a dinosaur mummy, a lifelike sculpture and even a dragon from Game of Thrones.Now, 110 million years after it died, the 18ft-long nodosaur – hailed as the best-preserved armoured dinosaur in the world – has been unveiled at a Canadian museum.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ashifa Kassam in Toronto Tags: Dinosaurs Canada Fossils Americas Evolution Biology Zoology Science Museums Culture World news Source Type: news

Dental Hygiene KOL Patti DiGangi, RDH Publishes the ROMA* Manual on Dentistry
Part of the DentalCodeology Series, the New Book is a Light Hearted,Yet Deadly Serious Look at the Dental ProfessionAddison, IL – May 09, 2017 – Patti DiGangi, RDH, BS, a prominent dental hygiene thought leader, took a totally different approach when writing the latest book in her DentalCodeology Series.She and co-author Dr. Benson Baty took a humorous approach in examining some of the observations, insights and urban legends associated with patient communications, dental team interactions and clinical practice.“You can’t make this stuff up,” says DiGangi. “I think everyone who has worke...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - May 15, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without trave...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 15, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

New butterfly species discovered in Israel for the first time in 109 years
(Pensoft Publishers) Little does a scientist expect to discover a new species of easy-to-see and well-studied animal, especially if it inhabits thoroughly explored areas. However, Vladimir Lukhtanov, a biologist at the Zoological Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, made a startling discovery: a new, beautiful butterfly named Acentria's fritillary, which was spotted as it flew over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel. It is described in the open access journal Comparative Cytogenetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Feeding strategies in competing hummingbird species observed in a small area in Brazil
(Pensoft Publishers) Being the vertebrates with the highest metabolic rate thanks to their rapid wing flaps, the hummingbirds have evolved various feeding behaviors. While they tend to go for food high in energy, strong competition affects greatly their preferences and behavior towards either dominance, obedience, traplining or a strategy named hide-and-wait, conclude Brazilian scientists after observing several species of hummingbirds over the span of six months. Their conclusions are published in the open access journal Zoologia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mass die-offs accelerate across the planet, by 2020 two-thirds of wild animals will be wiped out
(Natural News) The planet’s animal population is rapidly dwindling, with about two-thirds expected to be wiped out by 2020, a recent analysis revealed. To carry out the study, researchers from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) compiled data on animal population and found that it declined by 57 percent between 1970 and 2012.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bow wow: scientists create definitive canine family tree
Study sheds light on breed evolution and why certain types of dog are prone to the same diseases despite appearing to be very differentIt sounds like the ultimate shaggy dog story, but scientists say they have created the definitive canine family tree.The study not only sheds light on the evolution of different breeds, but also reveals why certain breeds are prone to the same diseases even though they appear to be very different.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Biology Dogs Evolution Animals Zoology Genetics Science Source Type: news

Plastic-eating worms could help wage war on waste
Wax moth larvae are usually bred as fish bait, but a chance discovery has revealed their taste for plastic – which could be used to beat polluting plasticFor caterpillars that are bred as premium fish bait, it must rank as a better life. Rather than dangling on the end of a hook and wondering what comes next, the grubs are set to join the war on plastic waste.The larvae of wax moths are sold as delicious snacks for chub, carp and catfish, but in the wild the worms live on beeswax, making them the scourge of beekeepers across Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Biology Plastic bags Plastics Science Environment Zoology Animal behaviour Source Type: news

He Was Searching For Intersexual Pigs And Ended Up Finding The World's Rarest Dog
Twenty years after beginning his quest to find what’s been called the world’s rarest canine species, James “Mac” McIntyre was vindicated. There on his camera screen were the images he’d been waiting years for. The New Guinea highland wild dog — an animal once feared extinct — was alive and well, his pictures showed. “I squealed like a girl,” the 62-year-old said earlier this month, speaking from his Florida home. “It was emotionally such a tremendous moment. It was justification for all the work I’ve done.” How McIntyre ended up finding the New Guinea ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sweet? Naked mole rats can survive without oxygen using plant sugar tactic
The subterranean rodents are able to switch to a fructose-based metabolic system previously only observed in plants, a new study revealsThey feel no pain, don ’t get cancer and look like baggy-skinned sausages with teeth: the naked mole rat is already famously weird. Now scientists have discovered what could be the subterranean rodents’ strangest trait yet: they can survive without oxygen by switching to a metabolic strategy normally used by plants.By switching from a glucose-based metabolic system, which depends on oxygen, to one that uses fructose instead, mole rats can cope with nearly twenty minutes in air ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Animals Biology Science Animal behaviour Zoology Source Type: news

How the humble fly can help to solve our most gruesome crimes
Flies are often the first visitors to a murder scene. Studying their grisly dining habits can reveal vital clues to help catch the killerFlies are regarded by most people as a nuisance at best, a harbinger of death at worst. They elicit little more than feelings of disgust and many people are happy to kill them without a second thought. But there is another side to the story. The fly is one of nature ’s great marvels and, perhaps, the criminologist’s best friend.In addition to familiar forensic clues such as fingerprints, tell-tale hairs and bloodstains, more and more criminal investigators are relying on the s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Erica McAlister Tags: Forensic science Zoology Biology Environment Animals Insects Wildlife World news Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
Ducks, red deer, cherry blossoms and leopards in the hill forests of Myanmar are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Science Mammals Source Type: news

Dive into the twilight zone off Easter Island reveals new species
A diving expedition off Easter Island (or Rapa Nui) in the Pacific pushes the boundaries of both technology and the human body to reveal a world of unique species just waiting to be discoveredContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Luiz Rocha Tags: Science Zoology Oceans Environment Conservation Marine life Biology Wildlife Source Type: news

Don Thomas obituary
My father, Don Thomas, who has died aged 88, was inspired to take up an academic life as a biologist, by his childhood love of the rivers, mountains and wildlife of Ceredigion in Wales.He was born at Llangeitho, a village near the market town of Tregaron, and attended Tregaron grammar school. He was always very grateful for the way that the school helped him to expand his horizons academically. By 1954 he had been awarded a BSc in zoology and a PhD from the University of Wales at Aberystwyth, where he met his future wife, Joy Robinson. They married the following year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Efua Thomas Tags: Biology Science Health Society Higher education Wales UK news Source Type: news

Bloodthirsty chomp-monster or sensitive lover? Time to rethink Tyrannosaurus rex | Brian Switek
No other dinosaur has sunk its teeth so deeply into our imagination, yet the focus on its hunting means we ’re surprised to discover it was a real, living animalWe ’re over 66 million years too late to know what tyrannosaurus mating rituals entailed. Whether the immense carnivores courted like oversized albatrosses, offered gifts of semi-rotted triceratops meat, or simply got down to business without pretence is a vignette lost toCretaceous time. But research published last week in the journalScientific Reports has spurred headlines suggesting that the great and powerfulT. rex might have been a sensitive lover....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Brian Switek Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Science World news Source Type: news

Brazilian Zoologia joins Pensoft's portfolio of open access journals
(Pensoft Publishers) In a new partnership between Sociedade Brasileira de Zoologia and academic publisher Pensoft, one of the most prestigious scientific journals in South America, Zoologia joins Pensoft's portfolio of open access peer-reviewed journals. Zoologia is to be published on the innovative and technologically advanced ARPHA platform, developed by Pensoft, and follow its traditional format, providing modern design, intuitive interface, and a lot of high-tech perks for all authors, readers and editors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tyrannosaurus rex was a sensitive lover, new dinosaur discovery suggests
Tyrannosaurs had sensitive snouts that they may have enjoyed rubbing together while mating, scientists sayIt made its name by terrorising Earth at the end of the Late Cretaceous, but Tyrannosaurus rex had a sensitive side too, researchers have found.The fearsome carnivore, which stood 20 feet tall and ripped its prey to shreds with dagger-like teeth, had a snout as sensitive to touch as human fingertips, say scientists.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample and agencies Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Biology Zoology Science World news Source Type: news

Panda personality traits may play a significant part in breeding success
(Zoological Society of San Diego) According to a study published in Biological Conservation,   an international peer-reviewed journal in the discipline of   conservation biology, personality traits may play a large part in the mating behaviors of the giant panda--and breeding successes or failures may depend on whether a bear's disposition is complementary to that of its prospective mate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 30, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Pigs' teeth and hippo poo: behind the scenes at London zoo
The Zoological Society of London zoo is home to more than 650 animal species. PhotographerLinda Nylind was given exclusive access to spend time with the keepers and find out more about their daily routinesLondon zoo was established in 1828 and is the world ’s oldest scientific zoo. Created as a collection for theZoological Society of London (ZSL), the animals from the Tower of London ’s menagerie were transferred there in 1832 and it opened to the public in 1847. Today it houses more than 20,000 animals and almost 700 species.ZSL is not funded by the state – it relies on memberships and fellowships, entra...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Linda Nylind and Matt Fidler Tags: Conservation Environment Zoology London Wildlife Animals UK news Science Biology Source Type: news

Strong interaction between herbivores and plants
(University of Cologne) A research project conducted at the University of Cologne's Zoological Institute reveals important findings on the interaction between nutrient availability and the diversity of consumer species in freshwater environments. A better understanding of this interaction will contribute to developing possibilities to maintain biodiversity in all kinds of ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

'Better de-horned than dead' – zoo chops rhino horns to foil poachers
Czech zoo takes saw to the horns of its 21 rhinoceroses in response to deadly attack at Paris wildlife park this monthA Czech zoo has started to remove the horns from its 21 rhinos as a precaution after the recentkilling of a rhinoceros at a wildlife park in France by assailants who stole the animal ’s horn.With rhino horns considered a wonder cure in Asia – for everything from cancer, colds and fevers to high blood pressure, hangovers, impotence and other ailments – poachers have killed thousands of the animals in Africa and elsewhere.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press in Prague Tags: Zoos Wildlife Zoology Science Biology World news Czech Republic Europe Environment Source Type: news

Spiders eat 400-800 million tons of prey every year
(University of Basel) It has long been suspected that spiders are one of the most important groups of predators of insects. Zoologists at the University of Basel and Lund University in Sweden have now shown just how true this is -- spiders kill astronomical numbers of insects on a global scale. The scientific journal The Science of Nature has published the results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

16th century 'zoological goldmine' discovered – in pictures
It was one of those moments historians dream of. In 2012,Florike Egmond discovered an enthralling collection of 16th-century drawings and watercolours of animals collected by the founding father of zoologyConrad Gessner and his fellow Swiss successorFelix Platter hidden away in the Amsterdam University Library. These and many more illustrations feature in her new book on early modern natural history illustration,Eye For Detail (Reaktion Books, 2017)Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Florike Egmond Tags: Science Zoology History of science Biology Source Type: news

CAS scientists review the basic and translational studies of hedgehog signaling
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Previously, in recognition of their work on this topic, Prof. WANG Yu from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Professor Andrew P. McMahon from University of South California were invited by the journal Elife to comment on latest work from scientists at Stanford, Harvard, and Oxford on newly discovered mechanisms of chemical modulation of HH signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chronic administration of nandrolone decanoate
(Bentham Science Publishers) Investigations by researchers of Zoology Department of Cotton College, Guwahati, and Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam, India, have revealed that long term exposure to elevated doses of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) can significantly affect aldosterone concentration and serum sodium/ potassium levels in albino mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Zoos shouldn ’t be jails – let’s reimagine them and enjoy animals in the wild | Jules Howard
We shouldn ’t let animals die in entertainment venues. Urban zoos where we could view wildlife through VR would reinforce the conservation messageIt really is a damning report. Of more than 1,500 animals kept at Cumbria ’s South Lakes Safari zoo between December 2013 and September 2016,486 were found to have died. Emaciation, hypothermia, accidental electrocution, gastrointestinal infections, a decomposing squirrel monkey found behind a radiator, two dead snow leopards. At the same time, the zoo was hit with a £255,000 fine for health and safety breaches after one of its keepers was mauled by a Sumatran t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Zoos World news Animals Virtual reality Wildlife Zoology Science Source Type: news

Open wide: a fascinating look at teeth – in pictures
The Teeth of Non-Mammalian Vertebrates by Barry Berkovitz and Peter Shellis offers a unique look at the teeth of fish, reptiles and amphibians teeth, from the hardened skin rasps of the lamprey to the fangs of the rattlesnakeContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Zoology Science Books Biology Animals Wildlife Source Type: news

Welcome home, Lonesome George: giant tortoise returns to Galapagos
After almost five years with taxidermists in New York, Lonesome George has returned home. He may be dead, but his legacy is very much aliveLonesome George is back in Galapagos.Following thedeath of the celebrity tortoise in June 2012, his remains were sent to New York to be preserved by expert taxidermists. With the support of theGalapagos Conservancy, the last Pinta tortoise was the star of a highly successfulexhibition at theAmerican Museum of Natural History in 2014. Today, he flies back to the Galapagos Archipelago after almost five years on his whirlwind taxidermy tour.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Henry Nicholls Tags: Lonesome George Science Gal ápagos Islands Ecuador Conservation Environment Zoology Animal behaviour Biology Wildlife Animals Source Type: news

New guidance on hand-rearing decisions for endangered penguin chicks
The first model of its kind which provides guidance on the survival likelihood of abandoned penguin chicks admitted to rehabilitation has been developed by researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Exeter, Cape Town, the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (SANCCOB) and Bristol Zoological Society. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 17, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

How we discovered the vampire bats that have learned to drink human blood
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Species new to science named after a 'Dungeons & Dragons' character
(Pensoft Publishers) Focused on terrestrial gastropods, commonly known as land snails, a team of biologists from the Natural History Museum of Stuttgart, Germany and the Zoology Museum of S ã o Paulo, Brazil, have been researching the Brazilian caves. In their latest paper, published in the journal Zoosystematics and Evolution, the scientists describe the fauna from several caves in central Brazil, including a new tiny species named after a character from the popular fantasy role-playing game Dungeons& Dragons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fossil of pregnant sea creature changes understanding of how reproductive system evolved
Fish-eating reptile Dinocephalosaurus, which lived about 245m years ago, gave birth to live babies rather than laying eggsAn extraordinary fossil unearthed in southwestern China shows a pregnant long-necked marine reptile that lived millions of years before the dinosaurs with its developing embryo, indicating the creature gave birth to live babies rather than laying eggs. Scientists on Tuesday said the fossil of the unusual fish-eating reptile called Dinocephalosaurus, which lived about 245m years ago during the Triassic Period, changes the understanding of the evolution of vertebrate reproductive systems.Continue reading....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Reuters Tags: Science Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Biology Source Type: news

Museum of Discovery to Expand Girls in STEM Program
The Museum of Discovery said last week that its Girls in STEM program will serve more girls in 2017 and expand to Jonesboro and Pine Bluff thanks to grants from Wal-Mart, Best Buy and the Women's Foundation of Arkansas.  Grants and private donations totaling more than $46,000 will allow the museum to grow the program this year to six weeks and serve an estimated 180 girls ages 11-14 for free. Girls in STEM gives participants a week-long opportunity to explore STEM careers as they engage in hands-on activities led by women STEM professionals, ultimately encouraging them to continue their STEM studies and even pursue ST...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - February 13, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

No wildlife charity campaigns to save parasites. But they should
We tend to think of parasites as harmful, itchy, nasty, creepy crawlies. But these strange, beautiful creatures have many uses – and they need our helpUntil very recently, the skies of North America played host to one of the largest birds on earth: the Californian condor (Gymnogyps californianus). Weighing in at 12 kg with a wingspan of three metres, these remarkable birds were almost lost to us until efforts were made in 1987 to round up the last remaining 27 individuals of the species for captive breeding efforts at San Diego Zoo.However, these birds were not alone. Nestled amongst their feathers was another specie...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mackenzie Kwak Tags: Science Zoology Biology Conservation Environment Source Type: news

Starving Beached Beaked Whale Had 30 Plastic Bags Crammed In Its Belly
A rare goose-beaked whale that beached repeatedly on a Norwegian shore was so seriously ill that it had to be euthanized — and experts soon found out why. The two-ton animal had 30 plastic bags and other plastic garbage packed in its stomach. There was little room left for any food to nourish the beast. The whale’s stomach “was full of plastic,” zoologist Terje Lislevand of Bergen University told NRK TV on Friday. There was “no food, only some remnants of a squid’s head in addition to a thin fat layer,” he said.  Throughout the week the 20-foot-long adult male repeatedly swam ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Beached Whale Found With 30 Plastic Bags Crammed In Its Belly
A rare goose-beaked whale that repeatedly beached on a Norwegian shore was so ill that it had to be euthanized — and experts soon found out why. The 2-ton animal had about 30 plastic bags and other garbage packed in its stomach. There was “no food, only some remnants of a squid’s head in addition to a thin fat layer,” said University of Bergen zoologist Terje Lislevand, according to The Associated Press.  The 20-foot adult male whale had appeared several times in shallow waters off the island of Sotra, and personnel from both the fire department and the Department of Wildlife Conservation ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

CAS scientists discover BCAS2 involved in alternative mRNA splicing in spermatogonia and the transit to meiosis
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Recently, a work led by Professor Li Lei in Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported that BCAS2 is involved in alternative mRNA splicing in mouse spermatogonia and the transition to meiosis. In fact, BCAS2 is a small protein conserved in organisms and may play important roles in several processes including pre-mRNA splicing and DNA damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

[Book Review] Darwin's American ascendancy
Randall Fuller's lively new volume, The Book That Changed America, draws readers into the political and intellectual foment of antebellum America on the cusp of war. In just under 300 pages, he unfolds the story of how On the Origin of Species debuted in the United States on the eve of the Civil War and was read by a country torn apart by slavery and divided over whether the American union could (or should) survive the conflict. Moving deftly amid a diversity of familiar American figures, including novelists, poets, philosophers, zoologists, and botanists, Fuller captures their excitement, as well as their d...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Myrna Perez Sheldon Tags: History of Science Source Type: news

How Do Pheromones Really Work?
Pheromones are mysterious compounds that can make a mammal smell more sexy--but that's not true for humans. Zoologist Tristram Wyatt says human pheremones are hard to find.(Image credit: Maria Pavlova/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Are herders and livestock bad for rare wildlife? It's complicated.
(Wildlife Conservation Society) The Denver Zoological Foundation, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other partners have published a paper appearing in the early view edition of Conservation Biology that looks at the positive and negative relationships occurring between pastoralists, livestock, native carnivores and native herbivores in the world's largest unfenced grassland and desert. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lost British birdsong discovered in New Zealand birds
Recordings of New Zealand yellowhammer accents enable scientists to hear how their British relatives might have sounded 150 years agoA new study reveals that a type of native birdsong, now lost in Britain, can still be heard in New Zealand where the birds were introduced in the 19th century.Bycomparing recordings of yellowhammer accents in both countries scientists were able to hear how the birds ’ song might have sounded in the UK 150 years ago.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Georgia Brown Tags: Birds Animals Environment Wildlife UK news Zoology Science World news New Zealand Source Type: news

Brazilian study compiles data on 958 types of South American jellyfish
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Detailed information on 958 distinct morphological types of jellyfish that inhabit the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America has been compiled in a census published in Zootaxa, the leading zoological taxonomy journal. Coordinated by Brazilian scientists, the study involved scientists from Argentina, Chile, Peru, Colombia and Uruguay. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Efforts are needed to enrich the lives of killer whales in captivity
Keeping Killer whales in zoos and aquariums has become highly controversial. In a new article, experts outline several novel ideas for improving the lives of Killer whales in zoological institutions by enhancing the communication, feeding, environment, and health of the animals in order to elicit natural behaviors seen in the wild. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Efforts are needed to enrich the lives of killer whales in captivity
(Wiley) Keeping Killer whales in zoos and aquariums has become highly controversial. In a new paper, experts outline several novel ideas for improving the lives of Killer whales in zoological institutions by enhancing the communication, feeding, environment, and health of the animals in order to elicit natural behaviors seen in the wild. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

London Zoo keepers begin their annual animal count – video
Keepers at ZSL London Zoo begin their annual stock take on Tuesday, counting each animal from the 750 different species at the zoo. The Zoo ’s head of zoological management Mark Habben says the count is necessary to obtain a license, but it also allows an opportunity to share information with other collections around the worldLondon zoo ’s annual stocktake – in picturesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Zoos Zoology Animals UK news Biology Science Source Type: news

Dippy ’s last days: diplodocus leaves London after 112 years for farewell UK tour
Replica dinosaur makes way for blue whale skeleton in Natural History MuseumSo farewell then,Dippy the Diplodocus. For more than a century the much-loved 26-metre long dinosaur skeleton has held centre stage at the Natural History Museum in London, captivating generations of children. But this is the last weekend of Dippy ’s residency. On Wednesday the 292 plaster-cast bones that make up his splendid frame will be taken apart and packed up.After 112 years as the museum ’s best-known prize exhibit, the country’s most famous diplodocus will embark on afarewell tour of the UK, following which there are no pl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tracy McVeigh Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Natural History Museum Fossils Museums UK news Zoology Science Culture Source Type: news

Cheetahs Are Far Closer To Extinction Than We Realized
A major conservation group is urging environmental leaders to list cheetahs as an endangered species, warning that populations of the big cats have crashed dramatically across the African continent in just a few decades. Only 7,100 cheetahs, the world’s fastest land animal, are left in the wild, according to a new report released Monday by the predator conservation group Panthera, the Zoological Society of London and the Wildlife Conservation Society. Those few remaining populations have been forced to live in just 9 percent of the species’ historic range in pockets of Africa and a small region in Iran as prote...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cheetahs Are Disappearing at an Alarming Rate
Just 7,100 cheetahs remain across the globe as the species continues to face a range of threats largely caused by humans, according to new research. Researchers behind the study from the Zoological Society of London, Panthera and the Wildlife Conservation Society called on scientists to classify the animal as endangered—a distinction that will promote additional funds for protecting the species. The study, published in the journal PNAS, shows that cheetahs no longer live in 91% of their historic range as humans continue to encroach on the animals’ land and hunt the prey that the cats need to survive. And becaus...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - December 27, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime Source Type: news