Behind a lesbian furore over a famous palaeontologist lies a deeper truth | Tori Herridge and Becky Wragg Sykes
No one knows if Mary Anning had lovers. But what a new film does get right is the vital role women played in her lifeThe furore over a film portraying the 19th-century palaeontologist Mary Anning as having a female lover probably tells us more about ourselves than it does about historical accuracy onscreen. Francis Lee ’s Ammonite might not be a scrupulously backed-up biopic, but it may just hit on the one thing that so many other accounts of Anning, and other early women in science, have missed: the importance of friendships and collaborations.Anning, theworking-class woman whose fossil discoveries changed the world...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tori Herridge and Becky Wragg Sykes Tags: Kate Winslet Geology Science Dinosaurs Evolution Zoology Fossils UK news Film Source Type: news

Wildlife tourism may negatively affect African elephants' behavior
(Wiley) Increasing numbers of tourists are interested in observing wildlife such as African elephants, and income generated from tourism potentially aids in the protection of animals and their habitats. However, a new Journal of Zoology study reveals that wildlife tourism may be a stressor for free-ranging elephants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The five: back-from-the-brink species once thought extinct
From wild dogs to horned frogs, all manner of animals are still capable of keeping out of our sight, some for over 100 yearsThis week, scientists in South Americaspotted a rare frog previously thought to be extinct. The Tropical Herving research group found a colony of horned marsupial frogs in a recent expedition into the Choc ó rainforest. The species had last been seen in Ecuador in 2005. The frogs’ natural habitat is in the high canopy of the rainforest, threatened by deforestation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Inigo Alexander Tags: Extinct wildlife Zoology Animals World news Biology Science Technology Source Type: news

Scientists find routine allomaternal nursing in an Old World monkey
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A team of scientists led by Professor Li Ming at the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found widespread allomaternal nursing behavior in an Old World monkey, the golden snub-nosed monkey. Based on more than eight years of field observation of infants and their mothers at Shennongjia National Park, Central China, as well as analysis of the monkeys' reproductive histories, the study provides the first evidence of regular allomaternal nursing in golden snub-nosed monkeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why the zebra got its stripes: to deter flies from landing on it
Pattern seems to confuse flies, researchers who dressed horses up as zebras findThe mystery of how the zebra got its stripes might have been solved: researchers say the pattern appears to confuse flies, discouraging them from touching down for a quick bite.The study, published in the journalPlos One, involved horses, zebras, and horses dressed as zebras. The team said the research not only supported previous work suggesting stripes might act as an insect deterrent, but helped unpick why, revealing the patterns only produced an effect when the flies got close.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Evolution Science Animals World news UK news Zoology Biology Wildlife Environment Conservation Africa Source Type: news

Basics: Everywhere in the Animal Kingdom, Followers of the Milky Way
As scientists learn more about milk ’ s evolution and compositional variations, they are redefining what used to be a signature characteristic of mammals. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NATALIE ANGIER Tags: Milk Animal Behavior Mammals Spiders Insects Flies Beetles Breastfeeding Birds Parenting Biology and Biochemistry Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian National Zoological Park University of Bayreuth University of California, Dav Source Type: news

Rare tiger kills prospective mate in London at first meeting
For 10 days, the London Zoo kept its newly arrived male Sumatran tiger Asim in a separate enclosure from Melati, the female tiger who was supposed to become his mate.Zoologists gave them time to get used to each other's presence and smells, and waited for what they felt would be the right time... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

'Eavesdropping' technology used to protect one of New Zealand's rarest birds
(Zoological Society of London) Remote recording devices used to 'eavesdrop' on a reintroduced population of one of New Zealand's rarest birds have been heralded as a breakthrough for conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gideon Mantell: forgotten man who discovered the dinosaurs
A new play recalls the battle in the scientific establishment that denied a cobbler ’s son credit for a major discoveryHe was the scientist who made one of the planet ’s most significant discoveries: the existence of dinosaurs. Yet Gideon Mantell’s place in history has for two centuries been overshadowed by a rival who stole his thunder. Now, Mantell is finally set to get his moment in the spotlight, in a new play that charts the little-known story of a man t hat science left behind.Mantell ’s discovery, in 1822, of an enormous fossil during a dig in a Sussex quarry would later be classified as the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rob Walker Tags: Palaeontology Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Zoology Science Stage Culture UK news Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
Macaques adapt to city life, Andean condors are released back into the wild, and a lion catches a seal in this week ’s galleryContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Wildlife Birds Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Rewilding: Can it foster human coexistence with nature?
(British Ecological Society) Rewilding may have the potential to drastically improve biodiversity but remains a highly controversial and divisive topic. A new book edited by scientists from ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and Utah State University aims to build common ground and show how rewilding can foster human coexistence with wildlife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny but tough: the tardigrades
Heat, cold, vacuum … the microscopic creatures, found recently in a lake in Antarctica, show remarkable resilience to a wide range of normally lethal physical conditionsRemains of the minuscule organisms known as tardigrades have beendiscovered in a subglacial Antarctic lake. The creatures, ranging in size from 0.1mm to 1.5mm, are often called water bears or moss piglets. The remains were found when scientistsdrilled a kilometre under the ice; previously, only microbes have been found in these extreme conditions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Morfudd Owen Tags: Zoology Biology Science Space Technology Source Type: news

Scientists identify toxic antipredator defense mechanism in locusts
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A team of scientists led by Prof. KANG Le at the Institute of Zoology reported an unprecedented animal defense mechanism by which an olfactory aposematic (warning) signal can be converted to a hypertoxic chemical to facilitate an antipredator defense in locusts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mangrove patches deserve greater recognition no matter the size
(Zoological Society of London) Governments must provide stronger protection for crucial small mangrove patches, is the call led by scientists at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), which hosts the IUCN SSC Mangrove Specialist Group, in a letter published in Science today (18 January 2019). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males
(University of Oxford) Researchers in the Department of Zoology at Oxford University have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection -- before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stick insect study shows the significance of passive muscle force for fast movements
(University of Cologne) Zoologists from the University of Cologne gain new insights into the motor function of limbs of different sizes. They have now published their results in 'Current Biology'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Did a supervolcano cause the dinosaurs' demise? – Science Weekly podcast
Some scientists are beginning to question whether it really was an asteroid impact that led to the dinosaurs ’ extinction – instead, they think it may have been a supervolcano in India.Graihagh Jackson investigatesWhen we were children, many of us learned aboutdinosaurs and their demise. Amassive asteroid, larger than Mount Everest is tall, smashed into the Earth, causing chaos in the form of tsunamis, wildfires and earthquakes. Plumes of debris created a darkness so stifling that it caused up to 75% of all animals to become extinct.However, a small group of scientists is questioning this hypothesis and putting...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Dinosaurs Science Fossils Biology Evolution Zoology Source Type: news

Engineers, zoologists reveal how gulls 'wing morph' for stable soaring
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science& Engineering) A unique collaboration between U of T Engineering's aviation expert Professor Philippe Lavoie and UBC zoologists provides new insights into how gulls configure their wing shape -- known as wing morphing -- to stabilize their flight. The findings could be used to design more efficient flying vehicles, including soaring drones for farming or environmental monitoring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blind creature that buries head in sand named after Donald Trump
Amphibian ’s behaviour compared to US president’s approach to global warmingA newly discovered blind and burrowing amphibian is to be officially namedDermophis donaldtrumpi,in recognition of the US president ’s climate change denial.The name was chosen by the boss ofEnviroBuild, a sustainable building materials company, who paid $25,000 ( £19,800) at an auction for the right. The small legless creature was found in Panama and EnviroBuild’s Aidan Bell said its ability to bury its head in the ground matched Donald Trump’s approach to global warming.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Donald Trump Climate change Amphibians Environment Zoology US news World news Animals Biology Science Source Type: news

Set your teeth on EDGE: World's weirdest sharks and rays on the brink of extinction
(Zoological Society of London) Sharks that use a whip-like tail to stun their prey, rays with saws on their faces, and river rays half the length of a bus are among the most unique species at risk of extinction according to the latest ranking from international conservation charity ZSL's (Zoological Society of London) pioneering EDGE of Existence program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Week in Wildlife - in pictures
Red fody, beached whales and wildlife rescued from an Australian heatwave in this week ’s galleryContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Week in Wildlife – in pictures
Red fody, beached whales and wildlife rescued from an Australian heatwave in this week ’s galleryContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Country diary: dinosaur poo on the banks of the Severn
Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire: We are after fossils from the upper strata, inaccessible until chunks are torn off by winter ’s teethAust Cliff is half a hill, sliced open like a birthday cake by the River Severn ’s slow knife, exposing two ornamental layers of pink and blue-green mudstone. Right here, about 200m years ago, a red desert was overwhelmed by a balmy ocean. Today, a cold northern sea mingles with a slowly churning river of mud, crossed at this point by the old Severn Bridge, once the longest s ingle-span bridge in the world. The scale of this place, in time, space and ambition, is magnificent.Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dawn Lawrence Tags: Fossils Geology Environment Wales UK news Biology Evolution Science Dinosaurs Zoology Source Type: news

NSF Lifts Proposal Cap for BIO
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has rescinded its decision to limit researchers to only one proposal submission per year to NSF’s Biological Sciences Directorate’s (BIO) three core programs as a principal investigator (PI) or co-PI. In October 2017, BIO had announced a no-deadline system for proposal submissions with the goal to reduce the number of rejected proposals that were later resubmitted without major changes and to encourage collaborations between scientists. The policy of limiting the number of proposals that a PI or Co-PI could submit to a given division annually was implemented in August 201...
Source: Public Policy Reports - November 26, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

'Old-fashioned fieldwork' puts new frog species on the map
(SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry) Months of old-fashioned fieldwork helped define the range and unique characteristics of the recently discovered Atlantic Coast leopard frog. A study published this month in the journal PLOS ONE pinpointed the frog's range along the Eastern Seaboard, its unusual call and a list of distinguishing traits. The lead author is a zoologist with the New York Natural Heritage Program based at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, N.Y. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Signal peptides' novel role in glutamate receptor trafficking and neural synaptic activity
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Dr. SHENG Nengyin at the Kunming Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Dr. SHI Yun's Lab at the Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, revealed a signal peptide function for glutamate receptor trafficking and uncovered a novel trafficking mechanism for glutamate receptors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Empire of the Eagle: the world's most graceful bird – in pictures
The Empire of the Eagle: An Illustrated Natural History, by Mike Unwin and David Tipling, is published byYale University Press and celebrates the world ’s 68 eagle species in all their magnificence and beguiling diversityContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Wildlife Birds Environment Zoology Books Animals Culture Science Photography Biology Source Type: news

‘ Ground-breaking ’ great ape activity device revealed at Bristol Zoo Gardens
A team of scientists from the University of Bristol and Bristol Zoological Society have collaborated to develop a ‘ ground-breaking ’ new animal enrichment activity for the gorillas at Bristol Zoo Gardens. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Institutes, Institutes, Brigstow, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Experimental Psychology, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths Source Type: news

Aubrey Manning obituary
Ethologist, broadcaster and expert on the evolutionary genetics of animal behaviour who was a natural communicator on televisionAubrey Manning ’s hugely popular 1998 BBC seriesEarth Story, about the evolution and shaping of the planet Earth, inspired a generation and led to a noticeable increase in students applying to read earth sciences. Yet, Aubrey, who has died aged 88, was not a geologist, but an ethologist, whose work made an important contribution to the understanding of how animal behaviour plays a role in the evolution of new species.In a series of experiments at Oxford and Edinburgh universities – he ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Sington Tags: Science BBC Environment Wildlife Genetics Geology Television & radio Zoology Animals Radio 4 Population University of Edinburgh Source Type: news

Talk to your baby like you talk to your dog
This might sound strange, but I found talking to my dog much less stressful than talking to my babies. They had a lot in common: Both were non-verbal, both relied on me for their well-being, and both were in possession of what Austrian zoologist Konrad Lorenz called "baby schema." (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ZSL report finds palm oil companies' commitments lacking
(Zoological Society of London) Zero-deforestation commitments within the palm oil industry risk being undermined by a lack of monitoring within production landscapes - meaning the deforestation of tropical forests home to Critically Endangered wildlife such as Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) and orangutans (Pongo abelii) could be going unreported. This is just one finding of an in-depth evaluation of palm oil companies, published today by ZSL (Zoological Society of London). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine offers hope for third generation approach
Researchers from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology have demonstrated pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine in a new paper published in Nature Communications. Influenza is thought to be a highly variable virus, able to mutate and escape immunity built up in the population due to its circulation in previous seasons. However, influenza seasons tend to be dominated by a limited number of antigenically and genetically distinct influenza viruses. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine offers hope for third generation approach
(University of Oxford) Researchers from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology have demonstrated pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine in a new paper published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fire at Brazil's National Museum Destroys Millions of Science Collections
A massive fire at Brazil’s National Museum in Rio de Janeiro has resulted in the loss of about 20 million artefacts, including science and natural history collections. Details of the extent of the damage are still emerging, but a large insect collection of nearly 5 million specimens has reportedly been lost. The herbarium, which houses about 650,000 plant specimens, had moved to a separate building in 2007 and was spared from the fire. “It’s an irreparable loss, not only for Brazilian science but for the world. The building can be reconstructed, restored, and everything else, but the collections can neve...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 18, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

200 Scientists Participate in 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits
Across the country, biologists have been meeting with their lawmakers this summer and fall as part of AIBS’s 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits. In its tenth year, this national science advocacy event enables scientists to meet with their federal or state elected officials in their local community. Over 200 individuals from 34 states are participating this year. “I had a great experience with the AIBS Congressional District Visit Day. As a graduate student this training is so vital to the development of civically engaged scientists,” said Alexandra Chirakos, a graduate student at th...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 18, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Ancient bird bones redate human activity in Madagascar by 6,000 years
(Zoological Society of London) Analysis of bones, from what was once the world's largest bird, has revealed that humans arrived on the tropical island of Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously thought -- according to a study published today, Sept. 12, 2018, in the journal Science Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lost Worlds are Lost
So long, and thanks for all the hitsSince2012 I have been writing for the Guardian on these pages and the forerunner of LWR, theLost Worlds blog. It ’s (generally) been a pleasure and privilege to help cover new and exciting discoveries likegiant sauropods andfighting thick-headed dinosaurs, and especially new taxa includingRegaliceratops andNyasasaurus. In addition, it has given me a platform to talk about important issues inscience communication and education (like myT. rex documentary andcreationists being, shock, wrong) and other aspects of palaeontology and the biological sciences including thepredictive power o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dr Dave Hone Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Science Zoology Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
An anaesthetised polar bear, a surprising pine marten and a potty-mouthed parrot are among this week ’s imagesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Joanna Ruck Tags: Environment Animals Wildlife Science World news Zoos Zoology Biology News photography Source Type: news

The ‘grieving’ orca mother? Projecting emotions on animals is a sad mistake | Jules Howard
When we interpret animal behaviour as humanlike, we risk simply seeing ourselves – which demeans us and themAnd so, the killer whale known as J35 is back to her old self. She is no longer carrying the dead body of a calf she heldaloft in the water for more than two weeks. Her so-calledtour of grief has ended, to the relief of a global audience who had become wrapped up in this heart-wrenching animal drama. Great news, right? Sure. Yet I have a strange feeling in my stomach. It ’s a familiar one. The pedant in me is stirring, eager to get us to consider what we know about animals and what we don’t – ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Whales Animal behaviour Animals Zoology World news Mammals Death and dying Science Cetaceans Wildlife Source Type: news

‘She’s Clearly Reacting to a Loss’: Experts Say Killer Whale Carrying Her Dead Calf for 17 Days May Actually Be Grieving
A mother orca whale is still carrying the body of her calf 17 days after it died, in what some experts say may be an unprecedented testament to the strength of the species’ familial bonds. The whale, known as Tahlequah or J35, is one of just 75 Southern Resident killer whales left in the ocean, and her calf — which died minutes after it was born last month — was the group’s first live birth since 2015. Tahlequah has been spotted in waters off the Pacific Northwest multiple times over the past two weeks, often pushing her calf’s corpse through the water or swimming with it balancing on her fore...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Wildlife Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A Sumatran orangutan, fireflies mating and a sea lion cooling off in record-breaking Californian heat are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Animals World news Zoology Environment Biology Science Source Type: news

Explore 1 Of The World's Largest Collections Of Bird Eggs And Nests
The Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo, Calif., houses one of the largest collections of birds eggs and nests in the world. As part of our summer road trip collaboration with Atlas Obscura, we explore the collection and meet the scientists who run the foundation. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dylan Thuras Source Type: news

Explore One Of The World's Largest Collections Of Bird Eggs And Nests
The Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo, Calif., houses one of the largest collections of birds eggs and nests in the world. As part of our summer road trip collaboration with Atlas Obscura, we explore the collection and meet the scientists who run the foundation. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dylan Thuras Source Type: news

Book clinic: which books best capture our relationship with animals?
Carl Safina ’s educated anthropomorphism and Alex Preston’s vivid bird portraits are the wild stuff to illuminate our place in the natural worldWhich books best depict our relationship with other species without being oversentimental or too philosophical?Carlos Lugo-Ortiz, 52, professor of biology and entomology, Ponce, Puerto RicoCharles Foster, author of the Baillie Gifford-longlistedBeing a Beast (Profile, £8.99), writes:The stipulation “over-sentimental” indicates, I assume, impatience with anthropomorphism. I’m impatient with that impatience. Anthropomorphism, as the American biolog...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Charles Foster Tags: Science and nature books Zoology Biology Culture Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A quarter of a million roosting gannets in Yorkshire, an orca whale mother keeps her dead calf afloat and Norwegian reindeer seek cool in busy road tunnels – it’s the week in wildlifeContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 3, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Birds fish Bees Coral Natural disasters and extreme weather Whales Plastics Source Type: news

Can science save Australia ’s quoll from a deadly diet?
Targeted genetics will help a threatened species spurn a poisonous toad mealAustralia ’s northern quoll, one of the world’s rarest carnivores, has developed a feeding habit that puts its very existence in peril. The squirrel-sized marsupial turns out to have a fondness for the poisonous flesh of invasive cane toads, introduced into Australia in the 1930s. And this appetite has wi ped out vast numbers of the species across the country. As a result, the northern quoll is now considered to be nationally endangered.But scientists have launched a remarkable project aimed at saving the little nocturnal hunters. They ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science Editor Tags: Endangered species Science Zoology Conservation Australia news Genetics Biodiversity World news Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A new species of spider, frolicking hares and migratory sea turtles are among this week ’s pick of images from our overheated natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 27, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 24, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Scientific procedures involving animals at lowest level since 2010
But animal rights groups say more should be done to reduce those bred with genetic alterationsScientific procedures involving animals are at their lowest level since 2010, but animal rights groups say the government is not doing enough to reduce the number of animals bred with genetic alterations.New statistics released by the Home Office show there were almost 3.8m scientific procedures involving animals in 2017, a 4% drop on the previous year. These included 1.89m experiments on live animals – with reasons ranging from legally required drug testing to surgical training.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Animal experimentation Science Animal welfare Animals UK news Medical research Zoology Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 9, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news