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Lost species of bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years
The rare oriental blue clearwing, that disguises itself as a bee, was spotted in the Malaysian rainforestA moth that disguises itself as a bee and was previously only identified by a single damaged specimen collected in 1887 has been rediscovered in the Malaysian rainforest by a lepidopterist from Poland.The oriental blue clearwing (Heterosphecia tawonoides) was seen “mud-puddling” – collecting salts and minerals from damp areas with its tongue-like proboscis – on the banks of a river in Malaysia’s lowland rainforest, one of the most wildlife-rich – and threatened – regions on Eart...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Insects Conservation Endangered species Malaysia Environment Animals Wildlife Asia Pacific World news Zoology Science Biology Source Type: news

A genetic mutation in the evolution helps to explain the origin of some human organs
(Center for Genomic Regulation) A genetic mutation that occurred over 700 million years ago may have contributed to the development of certain organs in human beings and other vertebrates. This change, a random error in the evolutionary process, facilitated the connection of the gene networks involved in animal embryogenesis. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, was participated in by experts from the Centre for Genomic Regulation, the Department of Genetics from the University of Barcelona Institute of Biomedicine, and the Anton Dohrn Zoological Station in Italy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

4 Winter Solstice Rituals From Around the World
Thousands of people around the globe will herald the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, with centuries-old rituals like soaking in fruit-filled baths and dressing up as a devilish folklore legend that punishes naughty children around Christmas. The solstice, which falls on Dec. 21 this year, marks the first day of winter. It starts the moment the Northern Hemisphere is pointed at its farthest distance from the sun. The winter solstice is considered a turning point in the year in many cultures. The sacred day is also called Yule to pagans celebrating the birth of the new solar year, ac...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime winter solstice Source Type: news

Meet Dracula, the bloodsucking tick which feasted on dinosaurs 99m years ago
An Anglo-Spanish team of fossil hunters has found several perfectly preserved ticks amongst the remains of a feathered dinosaur nestAs if the dinosaurs didn ’t have enough to look out for with volcanic eruptions, fearsome predators stalking the land and a huge, unstoppable asteroid hurtling across space to ruin their day.Now scientists have found that the prehistoric beasts also hadblood-sucking ticks to contend with, having spotted carcasses of the parasites lodged in 99million-year-old lumps of Burmese amber along with material left over from dinosaurs and their nests.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Zoology Source Type: news

Blue Planet II: from octopus v shark to fish that crawl, the series ’s biggest discoveries
The documentary ’s marvels are not just new to television – many are new to science as well. From hyper-intelligent fish to the origin of life itself, we round up the series’s breakthrough momentsIt is testament to the number of spectacles packed into Blue Planet II that a giant wrasse ’s strategetic change of gender is – scientifically speaking, at least – one of the least remarkable. Changing gender, or sequential hermaphroditism, is a fact of life for more than 400 species of fish, andhas already been widely studied.But many of the programme ’s marvels are new not just to televi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elle Hunt Tags: David Attenborough Marine life Zoology Television & radio Culture Factual TV Documentary Wildlife Environment Animals World news Conservation BBC Science Biology Source Type: news

Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk
(University of Cologne) A study scientists from the University of Cologne have published in Frontiers in Zoology shows for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop. These new insights could contribute to making the locomotion of robots more energy efficient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA sampling exposes nine 'yeti specimens' as eight bears and a dog
Although it has not revealed the existence of the abominable snowman, DNA analysis has shed light on the evolutionary ‘family tree’ of bears, scientists sayHuge, ape-like and hairy, the yeti has roamed its way into legend, tantalising explorers, mountaineers and locals with curious footprints and fleeting appearances. Now researchers say the elusive inhabitant of the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau has been unmasked.Scientists studying nine samples – including hair and teeth – supposedly from yetis, say the samples are not from a huge hominin but in fact mostly belonged to bears.Continue reading... (S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Genetics Biology Science Zoology Evolution Wildlife Environment Animals Source Type: news

Bacteria as pacemaker for the intestine
(Kiel University) For the first time, a research team from the Cell and Developmental Biology (Bosch AG) working group at the Zoological Institute at Kiel University (CAU) has been able to prove that the bacterial colonisation of the intestine plays an important role in controlling peristaltic functions. The scientists published their results yesterday -- derived from the example of freshwater polyps Hydra -- in the latest issue of Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Making science sexy for teenagers
With demand for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduates far outstripping supply in Europe, the EU-funded STEM4youth project is taking these subjects back to the classroom, along with a dose of fun, to show teenagers that science can be sexy, and that it is central to many careers, from marketing analyst to ethics expert and zoologist. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 21, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Chester Zoo successfully breeds rare Catalan newt
Twelve Montseny newts – one of world’s rarest amphibians - hatched as part of joint breeding project with Catalan authoritiesConservationists at Chester Zoo have successfully bred one of the world ’s rarest amphibians – the Catalan newt – in an attempt to save it from extinction.The zoo is the first organisation outside Catalonia to become involved in the breeding project for the newt, the rarest amphibian in Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stacee Smith Tags: Amphibians Zoology Environment Catalonia Spain Europe World news Science Wildlife Biology Source Type: news

A moment that changed me: seeing my first moth fish | Fiona Gell
I was 22 and fascinated by fish behaviour. But when scientist Amanda Vincent showed me this strange creature I became convinced that my future lay in conservation — not in the labLike many of the most important occasions in my life, the moment that changed me involved fish. Holding the desiccated carcass of a sea moth while talking to my heroine, the fish biologist and conservationistDr Amanda Vincent, altered the course of my life.I was 22, and had just finished my biology degree. For my dissertation research I had spent a couple of months following butterflyfish in the Ras Mohammed national park in the Egyptian Red...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Gell Tags: Conservation fish Environment Marine life Wildlife Zoology Biology Science Endangered species Animals Endangered habitats UK news Source Type: news

Parent-to-parent: Tips for Home Parenteral Nutrition families
Four-year-old Thomas Onorato is a young zoologist at heart. Often seen with binoculars in hand, the adventurous preschooler is particularly drawn to bird watching. He enjoys talking about his feathery friends and studying their beauty and habitat. Thomas’ love of animals runs so deep that he says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. “Thomas is obsessed with animals. It’s his love,” says his mother, Melissa. Beyond his quest to care for animals, Thomas has two other important missions — to manage the rare condition, microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and receive the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Dr. Bram Raphael home parenteral nutrition Microvillus inclusion disease Source Type: news

What Darwin ’s theories tell us about the shape alien life will take
All aliens must evolve, says a new study from scientists at the University of Oxford – and that gives us something to look for“It’s life, Jim, but not as we know it.” How many times did we hear Mr Spock say this back in the day when classic Star Trek ruled the airwaves?* What always interested me back then was how did he know that it was life if it was so barely recognisable by Earthly (or Vulcan) standards?Turns out a group of scientists from the zoology department at the University of Oxford may have the answer. Don ’t look for faces, eyes, limbs or any of the large-scale things that are so ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Alien life Science Astronomy Biology Space Charles Darwin Evolution Source Type: news

New species of orangutan discovered in Sumatra – and is already endangered
Scientists identify new species of great ape,Pongo tapanuliensis or Tapanuli orangutan, but fear its survival is already in doubt as habitat under threatA new species of great ape has been discovered, according to scientists studying a small population of orangutans in northern Sumatra.Among the great apes – a group that also includes humans, gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos – orangutans are our most distant relative. Since 2001, two distinct species have been recognised: the Bornean (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatran (Pongo abelii) orangutans. Now, it seems, there is a third.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Primatology Science Zoology Biology Evolution Wildlife Environment Animals Asia Pacific World news Source Type: news

Why insects can develop from unfertilized egg cells
(Lomonosov Moscow State University) A scientist from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Biology, has, together with his Russian colleague, explained frequent occurrence of parthenogenesis -- development of organisms from unfertilized egg cells -- in insects. Studying this phenomenon is needed to successfully control species that cause damage to agriculture. The results were published in the Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dreaming of a cure: the battle to beat narcolepsy
A global struggle to find the cause of the rare condition that causes uncontrollable sleepiness has a long and strange history, but there ’s hope of a cure at handOne of my first jobs was to keep a lookout for lions. There are some occupations that are not suitable for someone with untreated narcolepsy and this is probably one of them. I was 22, a recent zoology graduate studying meerkats in the Kalahari desert in South Africa. We worked in pairs, one of us on foot, walking with meerkats, the other in the jeep scanning the horizon for danger. On many occasions, I awoke with the imprint of the steering wheel on my for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Henry Nicholls Tags: Neuroscience Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news

Not so nasty: dinosaurs liked to snuggle up and socialise
Fossil discovered after 70 million years shows Jurassic group sleeping peacefully togetherThe three young dinosaurs had snuggled together to sleep when disaster struck. A thick layer of ash or soil, probably from a volcanic eruption or sand storm, poured over them and the animals, each the size of a large dog, died within minutes.For 70 million years they lay entombed, cradled beside each other within a slab of rock, until US scientists uncovered their remains earlier this year. Subsequent analysis of the fossilised bones – which come from the Gobi desert – reveal the first known example of roosting among dinos...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, science editor Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Science Source Type: news

Warning of 'ecological Armageddon' after dramatic plunge in insect numbers
Three-quarters of flying insects in nature reserves across Germany have vanished in 25 years, with serious implications for all life on Earth, scientists sayThe abundance of flying insects has plunged by three-quarters over the past 25 years, according to a new study that has shocked scientists.Insects are an integral part of life on Earth as both pollinators and prey for other wildlife and it was known that some speciessuch as butterflies were declining. But the newly revealed scale of the losses to all insects has prompted warnings that the world is “on course for ecological Armageddon”, with profound impacts...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Insects Conservation Bees Wildlife Zoology Science Animals Environment World news Pesticides Farming Source Type: news

What sound do pandas make? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Jules Howard
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life ’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesA great frustration for those who study natural history is that the sounds made by almost every extinct creature that ever lived will never be heard by human ears. The best we know of the call of thedodo, for instance, is that, perhaps, its name was an onomatopoeic allusion to a two-noted pigeon-like “cooo”. Likewise, the best we know of thegreat auk, a flightless penguin-like bird of the northern hemisphere, is that it may or may not have made a “gurgling ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Zoology Biology Science Animals Source Type: news

Duck egg blue and oviraptor green: study reconstructs colour of dinosaur eggs
A new study of oviraptor eggshell fragments shows remarkable similarities between the reproductive biology of dinosaurs and birdsBird eggs come in a variety of colours. From the creamy and chalky whites in doves and pigeons to spotted yellow lapwing eggs and brown chicken eggs, to the blues of blackbirds and American robins. The striking colours and patterns have inspired artists, scientists and home decor makers fromAristotle tohigh-end jewellers. Thanks to palaeontology, we can now add oviraptor blue-green to the spectrum.Remarkably, only two chemical compounds bring about the whole spectrum of bird egg coloration and pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Dinosaurs Birds Animals Fossils Evolution Zoology Biology Science Palaeontology Source Type: news

Keeping moving -- flat worms shed light on role of migrating stem cells in cancer
(University of Oxford) A new study carried out by the University of Oxford has used flat worms to look at the role of migrating stem cells in cancer.Researchers from the Aboobaker lab in the Department of Zoology used the worms (planarians) which are known for their ability to regenerate their tissues and organs repeatedly. By understanding how stem cells are programmed to move, what activates them and how they follow a correct path, researchers may be able to design new treatments for cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 3, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Meet the New Spider Species Named After Bernie Sanders
What do Bernie Sanders, Barack Obama Michelle Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio and David Bowie have in common? Thanks to researchers at the University of Vermont, they all have a new species of spider named after them. Researchers gave the celebrity names to a group of tiny yellow spiders originally thought to be the same species. The Spintharus berniesandersi, for instance, is a tiny spider found in Cuba that measures just a millimeter long. Courtesy of Ingi Agnarsson/Agnarsson Lab Professor Ingi Agnarsson, who led the research project, explained to Sci-News why they gave the eight-legged creatures such recognizable names: &ldqu...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized animals Barack Obama Bernie Sanders David Bowie Leonardo DiCaprio Michelle Obama onetime Source Type: news

Caribbean spiders named for Barack Obama, Bernie Sanders David Bowie, and others
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society has identified and named 15 new species of spider in the Caribbean. Given the vernacular names 'smiley faced' spiders due to the distinctive markings on their backs, the new species have been given names including S. davidattenboroughi, S. barackobamai, and S.leonardodicaprioi. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Naked Ape at 50: ‘Its central claim has surely stood the test of time ‘
In October 1967, Desmond Morris published his landmark study of human behaviour and evolution. Here four experts assess what he got right – and wrongProfessor of evolutionary psychology at the University of OxfordContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin Dunbar, Angela Saini, Ben Garrod, Adam Rutherford Tags: Evolution Human biology Animal behaviour Science and nature Zoology Books Culture Source Type: news

Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs deaf to their own mating calls
Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear itHumans trying to chat each other up in a noisy nightclub may find verbal communication futile. But it appears even more pointless forpumpkin toadlets after scientists discovered that females have lost the ability to hear the sound of male mating calls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Amphibians Animal behaviour Wildlife Zoology Environment Science Biology World news Source Type: news

Vegetarian dinosaurs sometimes strayed for a shellfish snack – study
Analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceansSome dinosaurs may not have been the strict vegetarians that palaeontologists thought they were.New analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceans, according to a new study published Thursday in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Science Zoology Fossils Biology Source Type: news

Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs that are deaf to their own mating calls
Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear itHumans trying to chat each other up in a noisy nightclub may find verbal communication futile. But it appears even more pointless forpumpkin toadlets after scientists discovered that females have lost the ability to hear the sound of male mating calls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Amphibians Animal behaviour Wildlife Zoology Environment Science Biology World news Source Type: news

Fish may use different behaviors to protect against parasites
(Wiley) New research indicates that fish may adapt their behavior to defend against parasite infection. The findings are published in the Journal of Zoology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Welfare of zoo animals set to improve
(University of Surrey) The wellbeing of zoological animals is set to improve following the successful trial of a new welfare assessment grid, a new study in the journal Veterinary Record reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fathers can influence the sex of their offspring, scientists show
(University of Oxford) It has traditionally been thought that in mammals only mothers are able to influence the sex of their offspring.But a new study in wild mice led by Dr Aurelio Malo of Oxford University's Department of Zoology has shown that fathers can, in fact, influence sex ratios. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope for improving protection of the reticulated python
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Trading in skins of the reticulated python is such a lucrative business that illegal exports are rising sharply and existing trade restrictions are being circumvented on a large scale. This is endangering the stability of populations. Therefore, researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the Royal Zoological Society Scotland are developing genetic methods for tracking down individual origins and potential trade routes of the skins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chilesaurus is the dinosaur discovery of the century | Brian Switek
This herbivorous creature could be the missing link in the dinosaur family tree, changing everything we think we know about their evolutionChilesaurus doesn ’t look like the kind of dinosaur that would kick up much of a fuss. The Jurassic saurian – named for the country, not the tasty peppers – was a small, bipedal herbivore that munched on plants over 150m years ago. It didn’t have nasty teeth, crazy horns, or the immense body size that typical ly launch the careers of Mesozoic celebrities. The creature’s secret is more subtle, and plays into a controversial reshuffling of the dinosaur family...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Brian Switek Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Science UK news Source Type: news

Monster mash: does the Frankenstein dinosaur solve the mystery of the Jurassic family tree?
Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, named after the seven-year-old who discovered it, changes everything we thought we knew about dino evolution …Name: Chilesaurus diegosuarezi.Nickname: The Frankenstein dinosaur.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Dinosaurs Palaeontology Evolution Fossils Biology Zoology Science Source Type: news

Fish confusing plastic debris in ocean for food, study finds
Behavioural evidence suggests marine organisms are not just ingesting microplastics by accident but actively seeking them out as foodFish may be actively seeking out plastic debris in the oceans as the tiny pieces appear to smell similar to their natural prey, new research suggests.The fish confuse plastic for an edible substance because microplastics in the oceans pick up a covering of biological material, such as algae, that mimics the smell of food, according to thestudy published on Wednesdayin the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Marine life Plastics Fishing Environment Wildlife Oceans Science Zoology Source Type: news

Fish mistaking plastic debris in ocean for food, study finds
Behavioural evidence suggests marine organisms are not just ingesting microplastics by accident but actively seeking them out as foodFish may be actively seeking out plastic debris in the oceans as the tiny pieces appear to smell similar to their natural prey, new research suggests.The fish confuse plastic for an edible substance because microplastics in the oceans pick up a covering of biological material, such as algae, that mimics the smell of food, according to thestudy published on Wednesdayin the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Marine life Plastics Fishing Environment Wildlife Oceans Science Zoology Source Type: news

Sir Patrick Bateson obituary
Leading scientist who focused on the biological origins of animal behaviourSir Patrick Bateson, who has died aged 79, was a scientist whose work advanced the understanding of the biological origins of behaviour. He will also be remembered as a man of immense warmth and kindness, whose success as a leader, teacher and administrator of science owed much to his collaborative spirit, generosity and good humour.He was a key figure in ethology – the biological study of animal behaviour. As well as being a conceptual thinker who revelled in painting the big theoretical picture, he was an accomplished experimental scientist....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Paul Martin Tags: Science Zoology Animal behaviour Animals Biology Norway US news University of Cambridge Source Type: news

Scientists discover unknown virus in 'throwaway' DNA
(University of Oxford) A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses.In research published in the journal Virus Evolution, scientists from Oxford University's Department of Zoology have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in fish blood or tissue samples, and could be used to identify viruses in a range of different species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Wildlife royalties -- a future for conservation?
(University of Oxford) Should people who profit from the cultural representation of wildlife pay towards conservation?That is the question asked in new research conducted by zoologists from Oxford University's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Paleoart: the strange history of dinosaurs in art – in pictures
Since the early 19th century, artists have depicted colourful – if sometimes fictional – dinosaurs and prehistoric environments, mingling science with unbridled fantasy. This art is the subject of a new book: PaleoartContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: All images courtesy of Taschen Tags: Science and nature Dinosaurs Books Culture Art Art and design Illustration Zoology Fossils Evolution Source Type: news

Too many bats are being killed for research
(Wiley) The work of zoologists worldwide is often an important asset for biodiversity protection, but a new article notes that scientists kill many bats -- even of threatened species -- to study them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists unlock planthoppers' potential to control future crop disease outbreaks
(eLife) Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Zoology have discovered how a severe rice virus reproduces inside the small brown planthopper, a major carrier of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Strong performance in Journal Citation Reports reaffirms Wiley as leading society publishing partner
Wiley’s performance in the 2017 release of Clarivate Analytics’ Journal Citation Reports (JCR) remains strong, maintaining its position as #3 in terms of the number of titles indexed, articles published and citations received. Overall, 1,214 Wiley journals were included in the reports (+9 from last year), of which 57% were society publications – strengthening Wiley’s position as the world’s leading society publishing partner. Wiley journals were ranked #1 in 26 subject categories, and achieved 363 top-10 category rankings. Particular success stories include the continued high performance of CA...
Source: News from STM - July 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Tardigrades: Earth ’s unlikely beacon of life that can survive a cosmic cataclysm
Microscopic creatures reassure scientists complete eradication of life on the planet is extremely unlikelyWhether it is a supernova or an asteroid impact, should a cosmic calamity strike, it seems there will be at least one form of life left: a tubby, microscopic animal with the appearance of a crumpled hoover bag.The creatures, known as tardigrades, are staggeringly hardy animals, a millimetre or less in size, with species living in wet conditions that range from mountain tops to chilly ocean waters to moss and lichen on land.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Zoology Science Astronomy Planets Exoplanets Source Type: news

'Truly unique': lioness adopts and nurses leopard cub
No wild cat has ever been observed nursing a cub from another species – the event may be the result of the Tanzanian lioness having lost her own litterA lioness has been spotted nursing a tiny leopard cub in Tanzania, the first time a wild cat is known to have adopted a cub from another species.The five-year old lioness, called Nosikitok is closely monitored by conservationists in the Ngorongoro conservation area and is known to have had a litter of her own in mid to late June.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Wildlife World news Environment Conservation Tanzania Africa Zoology Science Source Type: news

So long, Dippy: museum's blue whale seeks to inspire love of living world
Natural History Museum in London signals urgency of wildlife crisis by replacing dinosaur centrepiece with species alive todayIn the hot summer of 1976, when Richard Sabin was 10, he went on a trip with his Birmingham primary school to theNatural History Museum in London. Blown away by the scale of what he was seeing, the wide-eyed schoolboy was told by an attendant that if he wanted to see something really big he should make his way to the mammal hall, where the skeletons of a number of whales, including an enormous blue whale, were displayed.“Another gallery attendant went past, and I stopped her and said, ‘A...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Esther Addley Tags: Science Natural History Museum Whales Environment Marine life Museums Culture Wildlife Cetaceans Conservation BBC David Attenborough Television & radio Dinosaurs Fossils Zoology Biology London UK news Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without trave...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 11, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

When very hungry caterpillars turn into cannibals
Research shows that defensive chemicals emitted by plants cause armyworms to turn on each otherCaterpillars turn into cannibals and eat each other when plants deploy defensive chemicals to make their foliage less appetising, research has revealed.While it was already known that caterpillars of many species munch on each other, and that plants have a range of defence mechanisms, it was not clear whether the two were linked.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Insects Environment Wildlife Animals Zoology Science Source Type: news

Thought Leader: Quick Queries with Dr. Carl Clark, Mental Health Center of Denver (Video)
Carl Clark never planned to be the CEO of anything, but today he ’s the president and CEO of the Mental Health Center of Denver. As a young man, Clark was interested in anything that got him outdoors, so he studied zoology in college. It wasn’t until he had decided to pursue psychology instead that he found out about his dad’s bipolar disorder. “I feel like we got lucky, my family, that my dad got access to [mental health] services, because not a lot of people do,” Clark said. “In fact,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - July 6, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Kathleen Lavine Source Type: news

Thought Leader: Quick Queries with Dr. Carl Clark, Mental Health Center of Denver (Video)
Carl Clark never planned to be the CEO of anything, but today he ’s the president and CEO of the Mental Health Center of Denver. As a young man, Clark was interested in anything that got him outdoors, so he studied zoology in college. It wasn’t until he had decided to pursue psychology instead that he found out about his dad’s bipolar disorder. “I feel like we got lucky, my family, that my dad got access to [mental health] services, because not a lot of people do,” Clark said. “In fact,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 6, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Kathleen Lavine Source Type: news

Feathered dinosaurs from China visit the UK | Susannah Lydon
An exhibition including iconic – and infamous – feathered dinosaur specimens comes to Europe for the first timeFeathered dinosaurs are rarely out of the news and area regular topic for our blog. For those in the UK, there ’s a rare opportunity to see some of the original feathered dinosaur specimens this summer in Nottingham.The exhibition – Dinosaurs of China: Ground Shakers to Feathered Flyers – opened on 1 July at Wollaton Hall, home of theNottingham Natural History Museum. The ground-shaking sauropodMamenchisaurus, mounted 13.5m tall in a rearing pose, is a spectacular centrepiece. But, fr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Science Evolution Zoology Biology Source Type: news