‘That’s a lot of teeth’: 2.5 billion T rex walked the earth, researchers find
Experts calculate the total number of the dinosaurs that lived over 127,000 generationsOne Tyrannosaurus rex seems scary enough. Now picture 2.5 billion of them. That ’s how many of the fierce dinosaur king probably roamed Earth over the course of a couple of million years, a new study finds.Using calculations based on body size, sexual maturity and the creatures ’ energy needs, a team at the University of California, Berkeley, figured out just how many T rex lived over 127,000 generations, according to a study in the journalScience on Thursday. It ’s a first-of-its-kind number, but just an estimate with ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Dinosaurs Science Zoology Biology Source Type: news

Flying giant pterosaurs had longer neck than a giraffe, say experts
Intact remains, discovered in Morocco, may help engineers create stronger lightweight structuresPterosaurs, one of the first and largest vertebrates to learn to fly, have often been seen as the cool cousins of the infamous Tyrannosaurus rex.Now scientists have discovered the 100m-year-old secret to the success of the flying pterosaur: a neck longer than a giraffe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rhi Storer Tags: Dinosaurs Science Fossils Biology UK news Zoology Source Type: news

A bug ’s life: how a volunteer army is putting Britain’s wildlife on the record
Amateur nature recorders are providing vital data on beetles, soldierflies and a host of lesser-known insectsAshleigh Whiffin ’s day job as assistant curator of entomology is to look after National Museums Scotland’s vast collection of preserved insects. But her passion for the creatures doesn’t end when she goes home; in her spare time she spends hours recording and verifying sightings of a specific group of large c arrion beetles in the familysilphidae.“Silphidae are absolutely brilliant,” Whiffin says from her Edinburgh office. “They’re decomposers, so they are really vital for ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Isabella Kaminski Tags: Insects Wildlife Environment Hobbies Life and style Animals Conservation UK news World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Can a 3D printed beetle model simulate the real thing?
(Syracuse University) Zoology and biology researchers produce and test 3D printed beetle models to find out if they would be a feasible option when testing mate choice in these and possibly other insects (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Should we determine species through DNA? (part two) – podcast
In part two ofThe Age of Extinction takeover of Science Weekly, Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston explore a relatively new and controversial technology called DNA barcoding that is helping scientists to differentiate between species – including fungi, which we heard about inpart one. As the catastrophic loss of biodiversity around the world continues, could DNA barcoding at least allow us to accurately record the species that are perishing?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston and produced by Tiffany Cassidy Tags: Environment Science Biodiversity Zoology Conservation Biology Wildlife Source Type: news

Scientific Specimens Are Going Online, But Much Remains Hidden In Storage
From fish in jars to rare seeds and microbes, hundreds of millions of biological specimens are stored around the U.S., and caretakers are trying to make them accessible for future research.(Image credit: Melissa Aja/Museum of Comparative Zoology/President and Fellows of Harvard College) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Researchers find the secret of the bunny hop: it's all in the genes
Scientists pinpoint gene necessary for animals to adopt a typical gait by studying breed of rabbit that can ’t hopIt sounds like a conundrum that Rudyard Kipling would have tackled in hisJust So stories, but it turns out the reason why rabbits hop is rooted not in fables but genetics.Researchers say that by studying an unusual breed of bunny that walks on its front paws, they have pinpointed a key gene that is necessary for animals to adopt a typical gait. For rabbits, as well as animals such as hares and kangaroos, that is the ability to hop.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Biology Science Animals Zoology Source Type: news

Highlands of diversity: Another new chameleon from the Bale region, Ethiopia
(Pensoft Publishers) Once again, the importance of the Bale Mountains in Ethiopia as a unique hotspot of species diversity is stressed: a new chameleon species from the northern slopes of this remarkable Afromontane plateau was discovered and described by Thore Koppetsch and his colleagues in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. In honour of his outstanding research and passion for herpetology the new species is named after the German zoologist Wolfgang B ö hme. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mitigating impact of artificial light at night in tropical forests
(Smithsonian National Zoological Park) Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a major factor in global insect decline. In a paper published today in Insect Conservation and Diversity, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) scientists and partners found that using amber-colored filters to remove the blue spectra of light from " warm white " LED (light-emitting diode) lamps drastically reduces insect attraction to nocturnal lighting in a tropical forest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Answer to fossil record puzzle may lie with teenage T rexes, study finds
Absence of smaller dinosaurs may be result of adolescent megatheropods crowding them outTeenage T rexes and othercarnivorous dinosaurs the size of lions or bears may have crowded out smaller species, explaining why there are so few of them preserved in the fossil record, research suggests.Despite dominating the land for more than 150 million years, dinosaurs were not particularly diverse, and most known species were giants weighing 1,000kg or more – including massive, meat-eating megatheropods such asTyrannosaurus rex.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Science Zoology Palaeontology Source Type: news

Animal evolution -- glimpses of ancient environments
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Zoologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the discovery of a trove of fossil fly larvae, and an intriguing caterpillar, encapsulated in samples of amber that are tens of millions of years old. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers rethink life in a cold climate after Antarctic find
Scientists surprised by marine organisms on boulder on sea floor beneath 900 metres of ice shelfThe accidental discovery of marine organisms on a boulder on the sea floor beneath 900 metres (3,000ft) of Antarctic ice shelf has led scientists to rethink the limits of life on Earth.Researchers stumbled on the life-bearing rock after sinking a borehole through nearly a kilometre of the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf on the south-eastern Weddell Sea to obtain a sediment core from the seabed.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Antarctica Marine life Zoology Biology Environment World news Source Type: news

WHO Mission Finds COVID-19 Is ‘Extremely Unlikely’ to Have Originated from Wuhan Lab
(WUHAN, China) — The coronavirus most likely first appeared in humans after jumping from an animal, a team of international and Chinese scientists looking for the origins of COVID-19 said Tuesday, dismissing as unlikely an alternate theory that the virus leaked from a Chinese lab. A closely watched visit by World Health Organization experts to Wuhan—the Chinese city where the first coronavirus cases were discovered — did not dramatically change the current understanding of the early days of the pandemic, said Peter Ben Embarek, the leader of the WHO team. But it did “add details to that story,&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - February 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY WANG FUJIYAMA/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

Lucy Cooke: How Did Slowness Become The Sloth's Secret To Survival?
It's easy to see why sloths have become icons of laziness. But zoologist Lucy Cooke says behind their leisurely pace is a marvelous evolutionary advantage that is the secret to their survival.(Image credit: Callie Giovanna / TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Tel Aviv University professor wins Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists in Israel
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Professor Yossi Yovel, Associate Professor of Zoology at Tel Aviv University (TAU), is one of three Laureates to be awarded 2021 Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists in Israel by the Blavatnik Family Foundation, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Professor Yovel was recognized for his work in the area of Life Sciences and will receive $100,000. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wanted: UK bison rangers, no previous experience expected
Project using large beasts to help restore woodland offers unprecedented job opportunityCan you handle a beast as heavy as a small car, that can hurdle high fences from a standing start, and is a peaceful bulldozer for biodiversity?If you ’re not intimidated by the weightiest wild land mammal in Europe, you could become Britain’s first ever bison ranger.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham and agencies Tags: Wildlife Environment Extinct wildlife Conservation Zoology Animals Insects UK news Netherlands Europe Biology Science World news Source Type: news

Fatal captive tiger attack - a case report with review of literature - Kanchan T, Shekhawat RS, Shetty BSK, Jayaram L, Meshram VP.
The attacks on humans by big captive felids has been an issue of concern for the administration of zoological parks and wildlife conservationists. The theme of human-animal conflict takes a new dimension for the wild animals kept in zoos, circuses, exoti... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news

Siberia permafrost yields well-preserved ice age woolly rhino
Calf carcass from thawing ground in north-east region of Yakutia found with many internal organs intactA well-preserved ice age woolly rhino with many of its internal organs still intact has been recovered from the permafrost in Russia ’s extreme northern region.Russian media reported on Wednesday that the carcass was revealed by thawing permafrost in Yakutia in August. Scientists are waiting for ice roads in the Arctic region to become passable to deliver the animal to a laboratory for studies in January.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: AP in Moscow Tags: Fossils Extinct wildlife Science Climate change Europe Evolution Zoology Biology Geology Russia World news Arctic Source Type: news

Digital technology reveals secrets of UK's earliest dinosaur
Thecodontosaurus antiquusa nimble omnivore that ran on two legs, CT scans and 3D modelling suggestBritain ’s earliest dinosaur was a nimble omnivore that ran around on two legs, unlike its later relatives brontosaurus and diplodocus, research suggests.Standing at about the height of a 10-year-old child, and 1.5 metres in length with a long thin tail,Thecodontosaurus antiquus roamed the Earth during the Triassic period, more than 205m years ago, when Britain consisted of many islands surrounded by warm seas. As well as being one of the earliest dinosaurs, it was also among the first to be discovered. It was unearthed ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Science Zoology UK news Bristol University of Bristol Source Type: news

Scientists identify deep-sea blob as new species using only video
Duobrachium sparksae is a type of ctenophore, or comb jellyVideo identification without specimen ‘can be controversial’Scientists have for the first time identified a small gelatinous blob in the deep sea as a new species, using only high-definition underwater cameras.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Milman in New York Tags: Marine life Environment Wildlife Science Biology Zoology Source Type: news

Study finds false widow spiders bite can transmit harmful antibiotic-resistant bacteria
(National University of Ireland Galway) A team of zoologists and microbiologists from NUI Galway have published a new study showing that common house spiders carry bacteria susceptible to infect people, with the Noble False Widow spiders also carrying harmful strains resistant to common antibiotic treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Remains of new flying reptile species spotted in UK museum drawer
Student finds mislabelled fragment of pterosaur, which flew over eastern England up to 66m years agoA fossil that been had languishing in a museum drawer in Brighton, wrongly labelled as a shark fin skeleton, has now been identified as a completely new species of prehistoric flying reptile that soared majestically over what are now the Cambridgeshire fens.Roy Smith, a University of Portsmouth PhD student, identified the creature after realising was much more unusual and interesting than its label suggested. He identified the fossil as the tip of the beak of a new species of pterosaur (from the Greek for “winged lizar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Steven Morris Tags: Archaeology Evolution Biology Reptiles Fossils Science Zoology Cambridge UK news Dinosaurs University of Portsmouth Museums Culture Source Type: news

Jacky dragon moms' time in the sun affects their kids
(University of Chicago Press Journals) A new study conducted at the University of New South Wales and published in the November/December 2020 issue ofPhysiological and Biochemical Zoology sheds light on a possible connection between an animal's environmental conditions and the traits of its offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forgotten ideas from a Black zoologist
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alderton, G. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Tardigrades' latest superpower: a fluorescent protective shield
Scientists identify a species that appears to absorb potentially lethal UV radiation and emit blue lightThe might be tiny creatures with a comical appearance, but tardigrades are one of life ’s great survivors. Now scientists say they have found a new species boasting an unexpected piece of armour: a protective fluorescent shield.Related:Tardigrades: Earth ’s unlikely beacon of life that can survive a cosmic cataclysmContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Science Biology Animals World news India Zoology Source Type: news

Botswana says it has solved mystery of mass elephant die-off
Elephants may have ingested toxins produced by bacteria found in waterholesHundreds of elephants died in Botswana earlier this year from ingesting toxins produced by cyanobacteria, according to government officials who say they will be testing waterholes for algal blooms next rainy season to reduce the risk of another mass die-off.Themysterious death of 350 elephants in the Okavango delta between May and June baffled conservationists, withleading theories suggesting they were killed by a rodent virus known as EMC (encephalomyocarditis) or toxins from algal blooms.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Phoebe Weston Tags: Environment Animals World news Botswana Africa Conservation Zoology Biology Science Zimbabwe Source Type: news

The week in Wildlife – in pictures
The best wildlife pictures from around the world, from golden frogs to homebound birdsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Conservation Source Type: news

Scientists to examine the possibility Covid-19 leaked from a Chinese lab
An international team led by Dr Peter Daszak, a British zoologist, will delve into all theories of the virus's origins including that it leaked from a lab in China (pictured, Wuhan Institute of Virology). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Why wait for it?' How to predict a pandemic
Strides are being made towards an open access atlas that could predict where dangerous animal-borne viruses will next appearHow do you predict where a deadly tropical disease such as Ebola, possibly the most virulent in the world, will appear next? Since it first emerged in a small town on the edge of a Congolese forest, it has broken out in seven other African countries, often thousands of miles apart.Sometimes it has spilled out of remote rainforest and then disappeared for years. Other times it has turned up in cities, baffling world bodies and governments that can only try to respond as fast as possible. But actually, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Infectious diseases Ebola Zika virus Coronavirus outbreak Microbiology Medical research Science World news Animals Farming Environment Climate change Source Type: news

A new species of spider
(Universit ä t Bayreuth) During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, PhD student at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are aliens hiding in plain sight?
Several missions this year are seeking out life on the red planet. But would we recognise extraterrestrials if we found them?In July, three unmanned missions blasted off to Mars – from China (Tianwen-1), the US (Nasa ’s Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover) and the United Arab Emirates (Hope). The Chinese and American missions have lander craft that will seek signs of current or past life on Mars. Nasa is also planning to send itsEuropa Clipper probe to survey Jupiter ’s moon Europa, and the robotic landerDragonfly to Saturn ’s moon Titan. Both moons are widely thought to be promising hunting grounds for li...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Alien life Science Mars Space Biology Saturn Jupiter Astronomy Biochemistry and molecular biology Zoology Source Type: news

Book Excerpt from How Zoologists Organize Things
In Chapter 1,“An ABC of Early Classification,” author David Bainbridge explores the theological roots of zoology. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 1, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Reading Frames Source Type: news

Opinion: Zoology ’s Racism Problem
A new book explores the history of scientists ’ efforts to classify living things. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 1, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Reading Frames Source Type: news

The week in wildlife - in pictures
The pick of the world ’s best flora and fauna photos, including a ring-tailed lemur and a spiky sea cucumberContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Science Biology Germany Japan Italy UK news Scotland Source Type: news

The week in wildlife - in pictures
The pick of the world ’s best flora and fauna photos, including a perky grasshopper and a sleepy turtleContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology South Africa Thailand Germany Vietnam Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Fossils of 'big boned' marsupial shed light on wombat evolution
Mukupirna, meaning ‘big bones’, was probably five times the size of living wombatsFossils of a huge, hairy creature with shovel-shaped hands and unusual teeth could hold clues to the evolution of today ’s wombats, researchers say.They say the fossils belong to a new member of a group of marsupials called vombatiforms, and one of the earliest such creatures yet discovered.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis and Naaman Zhou Tags: Evolution Fossils Zoology Biology Science Australia news World news Source Type: news

Goodbye 'extinction,' hello 'evanescence'? Validating a new paradigm
(University of Chicago Press Journals) Naturalist and zoologist Georges Cuvier established extinction as a distinct field of science in a series of publications beginning in 1799. He confirmed that fossil species were formerly living species no longer extant, confirming similar conclusions of classical Greek scholars. However, mechanisms thought to control the process remained controversial for two centuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Africa: What Zoologists Should Learn From a Zoonotic Pandemic
[The Conversation Africa] Zoology has an illustrious history; it has triggered paradigm shifts in thinking. One of the best known was Darwin's theory of evolution, based on his observations of the natural world. It became the cornerstone of current zoological research. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Allosaurus dinosaur suspected to be scavenging cannibal
Dinosaur-on-dinosaur dining habit revealed by scrutiny of fossil bones from Colorado siteAbout nine metres long, with grasping claws and a skull it used like a hatchet,Allosaurus was among the most fearsome dinosaurs of the Jurassic period. Now, it seems, the animal could also have been a cannibal.Fossil researchers have revealed that bite marks found in a cache of dinosaur bones from the Mygatt-Moore quarry, western Colorado, were made by dinosaur-on-dinosaur dining. And the marks on Allosaurus bones had potentially been made by dinosaurs of their own kind.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Zoology Science Research publishing US news Scotland Academics UK news Source Type: news

Camper on Closed Disney World Island Is Charged With Trespassing
Richard J. McGuire told the police that Discovery Island, an 11-acre zoological park with aromatic trees and walk-through aviaries that closed in 1999, looked like a “tropical paradise.” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Johnny Diaz Tags: Amusement and Theme Parks Trespassing Disney, Walt, World (Lake Buena Vista, Fla) Florida Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Richard J. McGuire Discovery Island Alabama Source Type: news

All Your Coronavirus Questions, Answered
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news

Scientists digitally reconstruct skulls of dinosaurs in fossilised eggs
Research onMassospondylus carinatusembryossheds new light on animals ’ developmentThe fossilised skulls of dinosaur embryos that died within their eggs about 200m years ago, have been digitally reconstructed by scientists, shedding new light on the animals ’ development, and how close they were to hatching.The rare clutch of seven eggs, some of which contain embryos, was discovered in South Africa in 1976, with the developing young found to be a species of dinosaur calledMassospondylus carinatus.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Palaeontology Science Zoology Evolution Source Type: news

Your Pets Are Not Likely To Get or Transmit Coronavirus. Here ’s What The Experts Say
This weekend a tiger at the Bronx Zoo tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 in humans. But it’s a leap to worry if your household feline can get or transmit the coronavirus, says Karen Terio, chief of the Zoological Pathology Program at the University of Illinois’ College of Veterinary Medicine, which assisted in diagnosing the tiger. “A tiger is not a domestic cat, they are a completely different species of cats,” she says. “To date we have no evidence of the virus being transmitted from a pet to their owners. It’s much, much more likely that an owner could pote...
Source: TIME: Health - April 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer News Desk Source Type: news

Your Pets Are Not Likely to Get or Transmit Coronavirus. Here ’s What the Experts Say
This weekend a tiger at the Bronx Zoo tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 in humans. But it’s a leap to worry if your household feline can get or transmit the coronavirus, says Karen Terio, chief of the Zoological Pathology Program at the University of Illinois’ College of Veterinary Medicine, which assisted in diagnosing the tiger. “A tiger is not a domestic cat, they are a completely different species of cats,” she says. “To date we have no evidence of the virus being transmitted from a pet to their owners. It’s much, much more likely that an owner could pote...
Source: TIME: Science - April 7, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer News Desk Source Type: news

University of Innsbruck develops novel corona test
(University of Innsbruck) Michael Traugott and the spin-off company Sinsoma GmbH, together with the Departments of Zoology and Microbiology at the University of Innsbruck, are developing a new PCR system for the detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This new PCR method works with different analytical materials that are easier to obtain and allow high-throughput testing. First tests were successful. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Microelectronics for birds
(St. Petersburg State University) Ornithologists and physicists from St Petersburg University have conducted an interdisciplinary study together with colleagues from Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Biological Station Rybachy of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. They have created a micro device, weighing less than a gram, which enables them to disrupt locally the avian magnetic compass. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is factory farming to blame for coronavirus?
Scientists are tracing the path of Sars-CoV-2 from a wild animal host – but we need to look at the part played in the outbreak by industrial food productionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhere did the virus causing the current pandemic come from? How did it get to a food market in Wuhan, China, from where it is thought to have spilled over into humans? The answers to these questions are gradually being pieced together, and the story they tell makes for uncomfortable reading.Let ’s start at the beginning. As of 17 March, we know that the Sars-CoV-2 virus (a member of the corona...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news UK news Epidemics Genetics Zoology Source Type: news

SA zoo closing indefinitely, furloughing workers
The San Antonio Zoo has closed indefinitely and furloughed its staff due to concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic. Zoo leaders said that under current circumstances, keeping the park open is not generating enough revenue to fund a full staff. “The San Antonio Zoological Society is devastated that due to circumstances beyond our control we have been forced to furlough a majority of our staff today,” CEO Ti m Morrow said, noting that, unlike most zoos in the country, San Antonio's depends entirely… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: W. Scott Bailey Source Type: news

SA zoo closing indefinitely, furloughing workers
The San Antonio Zoo has closed indefinitely and furloughed its staff due to concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic. Zoo leaders said that under current circumstances, keeping the park open is not generating enough revenue to fund a full staff. “The San Antonio Zoological Society is devastated that due to circumstances beyond our control we have been forced to furlough a majority of our staff today,” CEO Ti m Morrow said, noting that, unlike most zoos in the country, San Antonio's depends entirely… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 20, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: W. Scott Bailey Source Type: news

Like a moth to a flame, we ’re drawn to metaphors to explain ourselves | Kenan Malik
We think we ’re learning more about the brain, but are we just replacing one story with another?The selfish gene. The Big Bang. The greenhouse effect. Metaphors are at the heart of scientific thinking. They provide the means for both scientists and non-scientists to understand, think through and talk about abstract ideas in terms of more familiar objects or phenomena.But if metaphors can illuminate, they can also constrain. In his new book,TheIdea of the Brain, zoologist and historian Matthew Cobb tells the story of how scientists and philosophers have tried to understand the brain and how it works. In every age, Cob...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Kenan Malik Tags: Neuroscience Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Language Source Type: news