Tongue-tied: T rex couldn't stick out its tongue
Researchers say many dinosaurs ’ tongues were anchored to the floors of their mouths and unable to waggleThe fearsome creatures ofJurassic World might chase you, kill you and rip you limb from limb, but there is one thing aT rex couldn ’t do: stick out its tongue.WhileHollywood depictions of dinosaurs often show the creatures open-mouthed with tongues waving, researchers have discovered that many of them were probably tongue-tied, their tongues firmly anchored to the floors of their mouths and unable to waggle around.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Science Evolution Zoology Jurassic Park Jurassic World Source Type: news

Cambridge zoology museum to reopen
Sir David Attenborough to tour new premises that showcase the extinct moa bird ’s feathersWhen SirDavid Attenborough opens the University of Cambridge ’s zoology museum this week, the proud curators will show him their fabulous discovery.It ’s fair to say the casual visitor might wonder why they are so excited by the scruffy frame containing a few cobwebby grey-brown wisps, discovered during a £4.1m redevelopment of the museum.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Zoology Conservation Museums Cambridge Biology Culture Environment Science UK news Animals Source Type: news

Did dinosaurs get dandruff?
Palaeontologists studying the evolution of dinosaurs ’ skin and feathers think they didAs a regular reader of this blog, you are well aware that dinosaurs had feathers (unless you are a certain film franchise). Dinosaurs were covered in patches of fuzz, proto-floof, shook their tail feathers, and in some cases displayed full-fledged plumage. Over the last decade, exceptionally preserved fossils and intense genetic study have taught us a lot about feather evolution. But what do we know about the evolution of the skin of dinosaurs and early birds?Vertebrateskin consists of several layers of cells making up the epidermi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Science Evolution Zoology Palaeontology Source Type: news

Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

When size does matter – Big Beasts: Last of the Giants – in pictures
Patrick Aryee ’s gets up close and personal with some of the world’s biggest creatures in his new three-part series. Episode one airs on Sky1, Wednesday 13 June, 9pmContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 11, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Science Zoology Biology Television & radio Culture Source Type: news

540m-year-old bug tracks are oldest footprints ever discovered
Ancient prints bring scientists closer to understanding what were the first creatures to evolve pairs of legsThe oldest known footprints on Earth, left by an ancient creepy-crawly more than 500 million years ago, have been discovered in China.The tracks were left by a primitive ancestor of modern-day insects or worms, according to scientists. Precisely what the creature looked like is a mystery, though: nothing this old with legs has been discovered to date.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Zoology Science Insects Evolution Archaeology China Source Type: news

Country diary: butterflies instinctively make chemistry sexy
Wyre Forest, Worcestershire: The male pearl-bordered fritillaries were laying pheromone trails low along the trackThe amber flicker materialised in air so saturated that it steamed through the trees, sauna hot. The orange light became two, spinning around each other only a metre above the ride, knotting and unknotting in the air. These weresmall pearl-bordered fritillarybutterflies,Boloria selene, males in a dogfight over territory.After each skirmish they separated, flying low in opposite directions, occasionally stopping to feed on bugle flowers or resting for a brief moment. Only then was it possible to see the black pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Paul Evans Tags: Butterflies Trees and forests Animal behaviour Biology Environment Insects Wildlife Animals Science Worcester holidays Travel Summer UK news Zoology Source Type: news

'New' dinosaur species fetches €2m at Paris auction
Scientists say 150m-year-old skeleton may be new species of carnivorous allosaurusThe skeleton of an extremely rare form of dinosaur has been sold for more than €2m (£1.8m) at the Eiffel Tower in Paris.The bones of what scientists believe may bea new species of the carnivorous allosaurus were discovered during a dig in Wyoming, US, in 2013.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse in Paris Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution France Biology Fossils Science Zoology Europe World news Paris Archaeology Source Type: news

Speculative biology: understanding the past and predicting our future
A new edition of After Man by Dougal Dixon, a landmark piece of speculative biology which influenced a generation of palaeontologists, has been releasedIn 1981, a remarkable book was published:After Man: A Zoology of the Future, by Dougal Dixon. As a child of the eighties, growing up in a science fiction bubble where daleks, vogons and the fighting machines of the War of the Worlds were at least as concrete to me as anything happening in the real world, After Man presented a biologically-themed alternative world to lose myself in.The premise of the book is simple: take the Earth today, remove the humans, and let evolution ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Science fiction books Evolution Biology Palaeontology Fossils Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers this Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 30, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Oldest known case of dandruff found in 125m-year-old dinosaur
Scientists have discovered fossilised dandruff on the skin of a feathered microraptorThe oldest known case of dandruff has been identified in a small feathered dinosaur that roamed the Earth about 125m years ago.Paleontologists found tiny flakes of fossilised skin on acrow-sized microraptor, a meat-eating dinosaur that hadwings on all four of its limbs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Dinosaurs Science Palaeontology Fossils Evolution Zoology Biology World news UK news Source Type: news

Palaeontologist Steve Brusatte: we owe Jurassic Park a debt of gratitude
The leading fossils expert says we are learning new things daily about the dinosaurs thanks to technological advances – and that film…There are a few precautions to bear in mind when approaching a palaeontologist. The first, and perhaps most crucial, is don ’t mention Ross fromFriends. It ’s not funny and it’s not clever and it really won ’t be appreciated. Don’t suggest that dinosaurs couldn’t have been evolutionary successes because they’re extinct. And do not, under any circumstances, refer to someone with outdated attitudes as a “dinosaur”.“I...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Dinosaurs Palaeontology Fossils Zoology Evolution Science Source Type: news

Rare dinosaur skeleton for sale – along with a chance to name species
Skeleton of unknown theropod is 70% complete and expected to fetch more than €1.2m in Paris auctionAnyone with a spare million euros or two will have the opportunity to own a unique dinosaur skeleton next month, and even to name it, if scientists can show it is a new species.Scientists say the skeleton of the species of theropod – or three-toed dinosaur – dates from the late Jurassic period about 155m years ago, give or take a million or so years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kim Willsher in Paris Tags: Dinosaurs France Europe World news Zoology Science Palaeontology Source Type: news

Rare dinosaur skeleton for sale – along with the right to name species
Skeleton of unknown therapod is 70% complete and expected to fetch more than €1.2m in Paris auctionAnyone with a spare million euros or two will have the opportunity to not only own a unique species of dinosaur skeleton next month, but to name it.Scientists say the skeleton of the species of therapod – or three-toed dinosaur – dates from the late Jurassic period about 155m years ago, give or take a million or so years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kim Willsher in Paris Tags: Dinosaurs France Europe World news Zoology Science Palaeontology Source Type: news

Beware the long face: horses remember your mood
Horses are wary of people who were angry-looking if they meet them again, and more positive to people who they last saw smilingThe following news is straight from the horse ’s mouth: our equine companions can remember human facial expressions, and an angry grimace will leave a horse more wary of that individual, scientists claim.The research follows previous work by the team from University of Sussex which compiled adirectory of horse facial expressions,and revealed that Black Beautycan read your emotions– a phenomenon also seen indogs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Zoology Biology Science Animals Psychology Source Type: news

Who Cares If They're Cute? This Zoologist Accepts Animals On Their Own Terms
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lulu Garcia-Navarro Source Type: news

Murder most fowl: Oxford dodo 'shot in the back of the head'
Revelation astonishes experts, who thought the renowned bird lived out its life in London as a money-spinning curiosityWith its plump head and bulbous beak, the renownedremains of a dodo at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History have long captivated visitors, Lewis Carroll among them. Now researchers say they have uncovered how the dodo died – a discovery that makes the old bird’s past curiouser and curiouser.Researchers used a form of CT scanning and sophisticated software to probe the anatomy and habits of the Oxford dodo - the world ’s best preserved specimen of the bird – anddiscovered ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Zoology Birds Endangered species Wildlife University of Oxford Science Biology Animals Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A newly hatched turtle, a roaming peacock and egrets in China are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Guy Lane Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

UC Berkeley's massive egg collection aids project up for Webby
(University of California - Berkeley) Why are bird eggs so varied in shape? Some are elliptical, others asymmetrical. Some are both, some -- like the spherical egg of the hawk-owl -- are neither. A team of designers at Science worked with curators at UC Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology to categorize egg from 49,000 photos in the collection. They found that egg length and shape relate to body size and flying habits. Their data visualization is now up for a Webby award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NSB Announces Public Service Award Winners
The National Science Board (NSB) has announced that Dr. Jane Lubchenco, distinguished university professor and marine studies advisor to the President at Oregon State University, will receive the 2018 Vannevar Bush Award. The award recognizes lifetime achievement for pursuits to improve the welfare of mankind and the nation through public-service activities in science, technology and public policy. Lubchenco is an environmental scientist and marine ecologist with experience in science, academia, as well as government. She has a diverse background in ecology, zoology, marine biology, ocean management, and public policy. Lu...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Green-haired turtle that breathes through its genitals added to endangered list
With its punky green mohican the striking Mary river turtle joins a new ZSL list of the world ’s most vulnerable reptilesIt sports a green mohican, fleshy finger-like growths under its chin and can breathe through its genitals.The Mary river turtle is one of the most striking creatures on the planet, and it is also one of the most endangered.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham and agencies Tags: Endangered species Zoology World news Animals Conservation Environment Science Wildlife Source Type: news

Happening Tomorrow! Citizen Science in Libraries: Fostering Community Connections on Citizen Science Day and Beyond
Are you interested in citizen science? Are you looking for new ways to engage with your community members, and would you like to encourage science discovery with more of your users? If you answered yes to any of the above, then don’t miss this exciting PSR webinar featuring Darlene Cavalier, professor of practice at Arizona State University and the founder of SciStarter, a citizen science database and platform. Darlene will describe several citizen science projects in public libraries in Arizona that are part of an IMLS grant, and she’ll share resources and information to spark ideas for your library. Citizen s...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 3, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Education Source Type: news

Dinosaur footprints found on Skye
Tracks of meat-eating dinosaurs found on Scottish island, shedding light on behaviours during Middle Jurassic periodIt ’s now a windswept island boasting pine martens, red deer and puffins. But 170 million years ago, some very different beasts were leaving their mark on the Isle of Skye.Researchers have unearthed a new site of about 50 tracks, some as big as a car tyre, from dinosaurs that roamed the island during the Middle Jurassic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Isle of Skye holidays Scotland UK news Zoology Source Type: news

Argonauts: the Astronauts of the Sea
How argonaut cephalopods evolved their own architecture to return to the open oceanCephalopod molluscs, the group of animals that includes octopuses, nautiluses, bobtail squid and cuttlefish amongst its living members, is a small but highly diverse group of animals. The group boastsocean giants, colour and shape changing octopuses,luminous ink squirters, transparent deep sea squid,aquarium escape artists, animals that mimic other animals, giant eyed vampire squid and they ’ve even conquered the air in species that fly,yes fly (Muramatsu et al. 2013).In short, it ’s really hard to stand out at a cephalopod party...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Carnall Tags: Palaeontology Fossils Biology Science Evolution Zoology Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A thirsty wolf, an albatross chick and a family of capybaras are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Fantastic beasts: everything you need to know about conservation studies
The conservation sector requires postgrads with passion, curiosity and a commitment to scienceGiving a new tamarin monkey a health check or investigating why a gemsbok died are some of the more hands-on activities on theMSc in wild animal health at the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London (ZSL). Wild animal care and conservation are fiercely competitive areas and a postgraduate course combined with volunteering in the field will boost your career chances no end, say course leaders.As awareness of the fragility of ecosystems grows, universities around the country are seeing a rise in interest in conservation-f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Helena Pozniak Tags: Postgraduates Professional supplements Students Higher education Conservation Biology Science Careers Zoology Source Type: news

Archaeopteryx 'flew in bursts like a pheasant', scientists say
The winged Late Jurassic creature would take to the air in frenetic, flapping bounds, fossil x-rays showArchaeopteryx, one of life on Earth ’s first stabs at building a bird, evaded predators and cleared obstacles on the ground by bursting into flight like a startled pheasant, a new analysis suggests.High-resolution x-ray images of the creature ’s skeleton reveal tell-tale similarities with the bones of birds that cannot glide or soar but instead take to the air in frenetic, flapping bounds, scientists say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Archaeopteryx Science Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Zoology Palaeontology Source Type: news

ZooKeys special: Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Myriapodology, Thailand
(Pensoft Publishers) For the third consecutive time, a special issue in the open access zoological journal ZooKeys is hosting a collection of the research findings presented at the International Congress of Myriapodology. The contemporary myriapod research presented at the 17th International Congress of Myriapodology, held in July 2017 in Krabi, Thailand, contains 13 novel research papers by 35 authors from across the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UGR scientist developed 3-D scans of beetles for Blade Runner 2049
(University of Granada) One of the main visual effects companies behind Blade Runner 2049, BUF, sought the collaboration of Javier Alba-Tercedor, a Professor of Zoology at the University of Granada, to obtain scans of different species of beetles used in the film's visual effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zoo Tinder – how technology is helping animals hook up
The Zoological Information Management System takes the guesswork out of animal attraction and helps promote genetic varietyName: Zoological Information Management System.Age: Eight.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Zoos Apps World news Zoology Biology Science Tinder Technology Source Type: news

The terrifying phenomenon that is pushing species towards extinction
Scientists are alarmed by a rise in mass mortality events – when species die in their thousands. Is it all down to climate change?There was almost something biblical about the scene of devastation that lay before Richard Kock as he stood in the wilderness of the Kazakhstan steppe. Dotted across the grassy plain, as far as the eye could see, were the corpses of thousands upon thousands of saiga antelopes. All appeared to have fallen where they were feeding.Some were mothers that had travelled to this remote wilderness for the annual calving season, while others were their offspring, just a few days old. Each had ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Derbyshire Tags: Climate change Animals Science Kazakhstan Biology Zoology Conservation Environment World news Source Type: news

FDA Investigates Pattern of Contamination in Certain Raw Pet Foods Made by Arrow Reliance Inc., Including Darwin ’ s Natural Pet Products and ZooLogics Pet Food
The FDA is alerting pet owners to a history of four recalls of and multiple complaints associated with Darwin ’ s Natural and ZooLogics pet foods, manufactured by Arrow Reliance Inc., dba Darwin ’ s Natural Pet Products, over the period from October 17, 2016 to February 10, 2018. In each instance, the company recalled these products after being alerted to positive findings of Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes in samples of their raw pet food products. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 13, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

FDA Announcement of Certain Raw Pet Foods Made by Arrow Reliance Inc., Including Darwin ’s Natural Pet Products and ZooLogics Pet Food
The FDA is alerting pet owners to a history of four recalls of and multiple complaints associated with Darwin ’s Natural and ZooLogics pet foods, manufactured by Arrow Reliance Inc., dba Darwin’s Natural Pet Products, over the period from October 17, 2016 to February 10, 2018. In each instance, the company recalled these products after being alerted to positive findings of Salmonella and/or Listeria mon ocytogenes in samples of their raw pet food products. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 13, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

FDA Announcement of Certain Raw Pet Foods Made by Arrow Reliance Inc., Including Darwin ’ s Natural Pet Products and ZooLogics Pet Food
The FDA is alerting pet owners to a history of four recalls of and multiple complaints associated with Darwin ’ s Natural and ZooLogics pet foods, manufactured by Arrow Reliance Inc., dba Darwin ’ s Natural Pet Products, over the period from October 17, 2016 to February 10, 2018. In each instance, the company recalled these products after being alerted to positive findings of Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes in samples of their raw pet food products. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 13, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Scientists capture exploding beetles' amazing escapes from toads' stomachs
Bombardier beetles observed causing audible toxic explosions inside toads stomachs causing them to vomit their lunch to freedomThe toad ’s reaction to the explosion deep in its stomach is not instantaneous. But in time the body shakes, the mouth opens, and the culprit is expelled: a mucus-covered beetle that will live to fight another day.Japanese scientists captured footage of the great escape during lab tests that pitted thewalking powder kegs that are bombardier beetles against hungry toads of different species and sizes. So effective were the beetle ’s defences against being eaten alive that even the resear...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Animal behaviour Science Biology Zoology World news Insects Animals Environment Amphibians Source Type: news

Whale and shark species at increasing risk from microplastic pollution – study
Large filter feeders, such as baleen whales and basking sharks, could be particularly at risk from ingesting the tiny plastic particles, say scientistsWhales, some sharks and other marine species such as rays are increasingly at risk from microplastics in the oceans, anew study suggests.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Whales Sharks Plastics Marine life Cetaceans Wildlife Environment Pollution World news Zoology Science Source Type: news

Novel body structure likely tied to mating in new extinct insect species
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Based on 2-D and 3-D data of several morphological features, researchers scanned all specimens with differentμ-Ct devices at Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two new snout moth genera and three new species discovered in southern China
(Pensoft Publishers) New members have joined the ranks of the snout moths -- one of the largest groups within the insect order known formally as Lepidoptera, comprising all moths and butterflies. Recently, a team of four taxonomists from the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences described two genera and three species previously unknown to science. Their study is published in the open access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wild Sri Lankan elephants retreat from the sound of disturbed Asian honey bees
(University of Oxford) A new study using playbacks, has for the first time shown that Asian elephants in Sri Lanka are scared of honey bees, much like their African counterparts.The study, led by Dr. Lucy King, a Research Associate with the Department of Zoology at Oxford University, showed that Asian elephants responded with alarm to the bee simulations. They also retreated significantly further away and vocalized more in response to the bee sounds compared to controls. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tiny dinosaur that roamed ‘lost world’ between Australia and Antarctica identified
Fossils found in 113-million-year-old rocks in Victoria lead to discovery of turkey-sized herbivore which lived in rift valleyMore than 10 years after fossils were discovered sticking out of a rock platform in Victoria ’s remote south-west, scientists have identified a new dinosaur that once roamed the “lost world” between Australia and Antarctica.Foot and tail fossils found in 113-million-year-old rocks near Cape Otway in 2005 have led to the discovery of a turkey-sized herbivore which lived in the Australian-Antarctic rift valley.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Michael McGowan Tags: Dinosaurs Australian universities Evolution Fossils Biology Science Australian education Zoology Australia news Victoria Source Type: news

Fossil evidence reveals butterflies and moths lived 50m years earlier than thought
Earliest fossil evidence shows the winged insects were alive 200m years ago alongside the early dinosaursThe earliest known fossil evidence of butterflies and moths has been found in Germany, showing they lived at least 50m years earlier than previously believed and challenging one of the most popular beliefs about their evolution.Scales from the wings of at least seven species were found in a sample of just 10g of sediment – the weight of a UK pound coin – and researchers believe there are “many, many more” to be identified.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Juliette Jowit Tags: Zoology Evolution Biology Insects Butterflies Wildlife Science Environment World news Source Type: news

Two Hundred Researchers Take Part in Science Advocacy Event
Science took center stage in recent interactions between researchers and policymakers. Across the nation, biological scientists and educators met with their lawmakers as part of the Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event, an initiative organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). More than 200 scientists registered to participate in the event. This nationwide event provides a platform for meetings between scientists and their elected officials in their local area rather than in Washington, DC or a state capital, and allows lawmakers to learn first-hand about the science and research...
Source: Public Policy Reports - December 23, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Evolutionary Systematics joins Pensoft's portfolio of open access scholarly journals
(Pensoft Publishers) Launched in 1884 and 1912, respectively, University of Hamburg's journal Mitteilungen aus dem Hamburgischen Zoologischen Museum und Institut and Entomologische Mitteilungen are now resurrected under the name of Evolutionary Systematics. Having joined the lines of the open access titles published on the Pensoft-developed technologically advanced journal publishing platform ARPHA, the journal remains devoted to whole-organism biology with a focus on collection-related research. The first issue of Evolutionary Systematics is live on the journal's new website. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lost species of bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years
The rare oriental blue clearwing, that disguises itself as a bee, was spotted in the Malaysian rainforestA moth that disguises itself as a bee and was previously only identified by a single damaged specimen collected in 1887 has been rediscovered in the Malaysian rainforest by a lepidopterist from Poland.The oriental blue clearwing (Heterosphecia tawonoides) was seen “mud-puddling” – collecting salts and minerals from damp areas with its tongue-like proboscis – on the banks of a river in Malaysia’s lowland rainforest, one of the most wildlife-rich – and threatened – regions on Eart...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Insects Conservation Endangered species Malaysia Environment Animals Wildlife Asia Pacific World news Zoology Science Biology Source Type: news

A genetic mutation in the evolution helps to explain the origin of some human organs
(Center for Genomic Regulation) A genetic mutation that occurred over 700 million years ago may have contributed to the development of certain organs in human beings and other vertebrates. This change, a random error in the evolutionary process, facilitated the connection of the gene networks involved in animal embryogenesis. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, was participated in by experts from the Centre for Genomic Regulation, the Department of Genetics from the University of Barcelona Institute of Biomedicine, and the Anton Dohrn Zoological Station in Italy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

4 Winter Solstice Rituals From Around the World
Thousands of people around the globe will herald the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, with centuries-old rituals like soaking in fruit-filled baths and dressing up as a devilish folklore legend that punishes naughty children around Christmas. The solstice, which falls on Dec. 21 this year, marks the first day of winter. It starts the moment the Northern Hemisphere is pointed at its farthest distance from the sun. The winter solstice is considered a turning point in the year in many cultures. The sacred day is also called Yule to pagans celebrating the birth of the new solar year, ac...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime winter solstice Source Type: news

Meet Dracula, the bloodsucking tick which feasted on dinosaurs 99m years ago
An Anglo-Spanish team of fossil hunters has found several perfectly preserved ticks amongst the remains of a feathered dinosaur nestAs if the dinosaurs didn ’t have enough to look out for with volcanic eruptions, fearsome predators stalking the land and a huge, unstoppable asteroid hurtling across space to ruin their day.Now scientists have found that the prehistoric beasts also hadblood-sucking ticks to contend with, having spotted carcasses of the parasites lodged in 99million-year-old lumps of Burmese amber along with material left over from dinosaurs and their nests.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Zoology Source Type: news

Blue Planet II: from octopus v shark to fish that crawl, the series ’s biggest discoveries
The documentary ’s marvels are not just new to television – many are new to science as well. From hyper-intelligent fish to the origin of life itself, we round up the series’s breakthrough momentsIt is testament to the number of spectacles packed into Blue Planet II that a giant wrasse ’s strategetic change of gender is – scientifically speaking, at least – one of the least remarkable. Changing gender, or sequential hermaphroditism, is a fact of life for more than 400 species of fish, andhas already been widely studied.But many of the programme ’s marvels are new not just to televi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elle Hunt Tags: David Attenborough Marine life Zoology Television & radio Culture Factual TV Documentary Wildlife Environment Animals World news Conservation BBC Science Biology Source Type: news

Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk
(University of Cologne) A study scientists from the University of Cologne have published in Frontiers in Zoology shows for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop. These new insights could contribute to making the locomotion of robots more energy efficient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA sampling exposes nine 'yeti specimens' as eight bears and a dog
Although it has not revealed the existence of the abominable snowman, DNA analysis has shed light on the evolutionary ‘family tree’ of bears, scientists sayHuge, ape-like and hairy, the yeti has roamed its way into legend, tantalising explorers, mountaineers and locals with curious footprints and fleeting appearances. Now researchers say the elusive inhabitant of the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau has been unmasked.Scientists studying nine samples – including hair and teeth – supposedly from yetis, say the samples are not from a huge hominin but in fact mostly belonged to bears.Continue reading... (S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Genetics Biology Science Zoology Evolution Wildlife Environment Animals Source Type: news