Anatomical details of rare electric fish revealed by an advanced imaging technique
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Thanks to the use of high-resolution microcomputed tomography, a cross-border research collaboration was able to study the only three known specimens of Tembeassu marauna, held at the University of S ã o Paulo's Zoology Museum. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Second of its kind 'sharpshooter' leafhopper from Brazil 'strikes' with its colouration
(Pensoft Publishers) When, in 2014, Brazilian researchers stumbled across a red-eyed leafhopper feeding inside bromeliads, growing in the restingas of southeastern Brazil, they were certain it was a one-of-a-kind discovery. Several years later, however, fieldwork in a mountainous area in the region ended up with the description of the second known case of a bromelicolous leafhopper, recently published in the open-access journal Zoologia. Thanks to its striking colouration, the new sharpshooter appeared even more spectacular. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How Bristol drones could help save our most endangered species
The University of Bristol and the Bristol Zoological Society (BZS) are pioneering a new approach to wildlife conservation, involving machine-learning and drone technology, which could impact wildlife conservation projects worldwide. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Announcements, Business and Enterprise, Current students, Grants and Awards, International, Postgraduate, Public engagement, Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engine Source Type: news

How drones could help save our most endangered species
(University of Bristol) The University of Bristol and the Bristol Zoological Society (BZS) are pioneering a new approach to wildlife conservation, involving machine-learning and drone technology, which could impact wildlife conservation projects worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £ 400 million per year
(Zoological Society of London) Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The week in wildlife - in pictures
The pick of the best flora and fauna photos from around the world, from an illuminated giraffe to an elusive southern elephant sealContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science UK news Conservation Marine life Birds Endangered species Source Type: news

Dinosaurs had feathers ruffled by parasites, study finds
Ancient pieces of amber found to contain dinosaur feathers riddled with louse-like insectsDinosaurs may have been fearsome and intimidating creatures that dominated the prehistoric earth – but it did not stop them having their feathers ruffled by parasites, researchers have found.Scientists have discovered ancient pieces of amber, dating from about 99m years ago, that contain dinosaur feathers riddled with louse-like insects. One of the feathers even shows signs of having been nibbled.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Science Zoology UK news Insects Animals World news Wildlife Environment Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
The pick of the best flora and fauna photos from around the world, including a giant tortoise and a painted storkContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
The pick of the best flora and fauna photos from around the world, including foraging sparrows and a swimming beaverContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
The pick of this week ’s best flora and fauna photos from around the world, including a tired tiger and sea goldiesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Vulturine guineafowl's complex societies overturn scientific assumptions
For the first time, researchers have found that some birds form multilevel societies, which zoologists had thought was something that only mammals did. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Veterinary Source Type: news

Meet The Mysterious Blob At The Paris Zoo
NPR's Scott Simon asks Audrey Dussutour of the French National Center for Scientific Research about a blob on display at the Paris Zoological Park. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A plucky otter, a mysterious blob and a Florida panther on the prowlContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Precious escargot: the mission to return tiny snails to Pacific islands
British zoologists part of global project to release 15,000 endangered creatures vital to French PolynesiaThey are some of the smallest animals on our planet, measuring from 1cm to 2cm in length. But the recent return of thousands of tiny tropical tree snails toFrench Polynesia represents one of the biggest reintroduction programmes ever attempted by conservationists.More than 15,000 partula snails – bred by a total of 16 key international conservation organisations, including theZoological Society of London(ZSL), and Edinburgh, Chester and Amsterdam zoos – have been shipped out to Polynesia over the past five ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie science editor Tags: Conservation Wildlife Environment South Pacific Biodiversity Biology World news UK news Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
An award-winning seal in a seaweed garden, a hippo in drought-hit Botswana and a sableContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Human-sized penguin fossil discovered in New Zealand
New species said to have been four times heavier than emperor penguinA giant penguin that stood as tall as a person has been identified from fossil leg bones discovered by an amateur palaeontologist on New Zealand ’s South Island.At 1.6 metres and 80kg (12st), the new species,Crossvallia waiparensis, was four times as heavy and 40cm taller than the emperor penguin, the largest living penguin.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Extinct wildlife Archaeology New Zealand Museums Science Zoology Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Bears on the Moon, Musk Vs. Bezos, and How Venus Became Hell in Space
A version of this first appeared as the TIME Space newsletter sent on Aug. 10. There are now bears on the moon. No, really. They’re tiny bears—barely half a millimeter in length—but they’re there. And oh yeah, they may be alive. The bears in question are actually tardigrades—a little like worms, a little like insects, with a fat, segmented body, and eight legs ending in tiny claws. Discovered in 1773 by a German zoologist who nicknamed them kleiner Wasserbär, or “little water bear,” they are found pretty much everywhere on Earth because they can live pretty much an...
Source: TIME: Science - August 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Source Type: news

Tardigrades may have survived spacecraft crashing on moon
Scientists believe the Beresheet ’s unusual cargo may be alive and well on the moonThe odds of finding life on the moon have suddenly rocketed skywards. But rather than elusive alien moonlings, the beings in question came from Earth and were spilled across the landscape when a spacecraft crashed into the surface.The Israeli Beresheet probe was meant to be thefirst private lander to touch down on the moon. And all was going smoothly until mission controllers lost contact in April as the robotic craft made its way down.Beyond all the technology that was lost in the crash, Beresheet had an unusual cargo: a few thousand ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Space The moon Nasa Zoology Biology Source Type: news

Species on the move
(Zoological Society of London) A total of 55 animal species in the UK have been displaced from their natural ranges or enabled to arrive for the first time on UK shores because of climate change over the last 10 years (2008-2018) -- as revealed in a new study published today by scientists at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bears and wolves to coexist in UK woods for first time in 1,000 years
Bear Wood near Bristol aims to spark debate about rewilding of ancient woodlandsFor the first time in more than 1,000 years native bears and wolves are coming snout to muzzle with each other among towering oaks and ashes in a slice of British woodland.European brown bears, thought to have become extinct in the British wilds in medieval times, and grey wolves – which roamed free until the 17th century – are to coexist in a project called Bear Wood near Bristol.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Steven Morris Tags: UK news Bristol Animals Conservation Environment Zoology Science Source Type: news

Avian malaria behind drastic decline of London's iconic sparrow?
(Zoological Society of London) London's house sparrows (Passer domesticus) have plummeted by 71% since 1995, with new research suggesting avian malaria could be to blame. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Let ’s Dive Into the Story of the ‘Ravioli Starfish’ That Looks Like a Stuffed-Pasta Shaped Wonder of the Sea
The newly minted internet star is a starfish that looks like an Italian dinner dish. The “ravioli” starfish, also dubbed online a “cookie” starfish, was the species most frequently found during a recent National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) dive into the Atlantic Ocean off the southeast coast of the U.S. The Plinthaster dentatus, as it’s formally called, is of course not edible. While it may be strange to see this shape of starfish, it’s a pretty normal sea creature, according to Chris Mah, an invertebrate zoology research associate at the Smithsonian National Museum of ...
Source: TIME: Science - July 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rachel E. Greenspan Tags: Uncategorized Ocean onetime viral Source Type: news

Last Chance to Register: 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits
The deadline to register for the 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event is approaching. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its eleventh year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their feder...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 9, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Help Inform Science Policy, Meet Your Lawmakers This Summer
Registration is now open for the 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its eleventh year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state ele...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 25, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Rare baby gorilla born at Taronga zoo
Taronga Conservation Society Australia has announced the birth of a Western Lowland gorilla. The female, yet to be named, was born on Thursday 6 June to Frala, an experienced mother, and was sired by Kibali• ‘Gorilla selfie’: DRC park ranger explains photo that went viralContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Endangered species Zoology Biology Environment Animals Sydney Australia news Source Type: news

Polycomb protein EED plays a starring role in hippocampal development
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A team led by Professor Liu Changmei from the State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, has shown that the PcG protein EED is essential for the proper formation of the DG. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The benefits of being different
(Zoological Society of London) Six different color morphs of the elusive Asiatic golden cat have been discovered in Northeast India -- with the findings being hailed as 'an evolutionary puzzle' -- as the world's greatest number of different colored wild cat species in one area are reported. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Meet Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its eleventh year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state ele...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 10, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Animal crackers: inside the world's most madcap menagerie
With its Frankenstein fauna and cosmopolitan chickens, Belgian artist Koen Vanmechelen ’s eco-park puts the perverse into biodiversityA huge steel cage pokes up through the trees on the edge of Genk in eastern Belgium. It emerges from a long, dark brick building that has the fortified look of a high-security laboratory. Through narrow windows, you can make out the inanimate bodies of pigs, chickens and strange winged creatures, lit by eerie neon lights, while a symphony of exotic squawks emanates from an aviary beyond. Hidden out here on the edge of a forest, it looks like some secret facility for developing future s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Wainwright Tags: Installation Architecture Biodiversity Museums Culture Belgium Animals Farm animals Genetics Art Art and design Sculpture Environment World news Zoology Zoos Science Europe Source Type: news

Jack Cohen obituary
Reproductive biologist and author of popular science and science fiction books best known for the series The Science of DiscworldThe biologist Jack Cohen, who has died aged 85, worked on animal reproduction and the development of feathers and hair; his Living Embryos (1963) became a standard university text. He also co-authored popular science books and science fiction, and designed alien creatures and ecosystems for science fiction writers. But he will be best remembered for the bestselling four-book series The Science of Discworld, which he wrote withTerry Pratchett and me.I first met Jack in 1990, when he phoned me at W...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Stewart Tags: Science Zoology Reproduction Science fiction books Biology Source Type: news

Help Inform Science Policy This Summer
Registration is now open for the 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its eleventh year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state ele...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 28, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Climate change responsible for severe infectious disease in UK frogs
(Zoological Society of London) Climate change has already increased the spread and severity of a fatal disease caused by Ranavirus that infects common frogs (Rana temporaria) in the UK, according to research led by ZSL's Institute of Zoology, UCL and Queen Mary University of London published today in Global Change Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gold makes invisible surfaces visible in CT
(University of Cologne) Zoologists in Cologne and Bonn have developed a new method for displaying previously invisible surface details using computer tomography. The key to success was a method from scanning electron microscopy: coating the sample with gold. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Water flea can smell fish and dive into the dark for protection
(University of Cologne) Zoologists at the University of Cologne have discovered the messenger substance responsible for the flight of the small planktonic crustacean Daphnia from fish in lakes. This animal's dive into deeper waters has significant consequences for the concentration of algae in the lake's ecosystem. The scientists hope that in future, a better understanding of this interaction might help restore the biological balance in lakes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy This Summer
Registration is now open for the 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its eleventh year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state ele...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 29, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
Hungry bears, busy bees and disappearing penguinsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 26, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Environment Animals World news Photography Zoology Biology Bees Birds Mammals Fish Insects Wildlife Source Type: news

Battle to save frogs from global killer disease
Amphibians are under attack from multiple pathogens, say expertsFrogs, salamanders, and toads across the world are now under attack from a widening range of interacting pathogens that threaten to devastate global amphibian populations.That is the stark warning of leading zoological experts who will gather this week in London in a bid to establish an emergency plan to save these endangered creatures. “The world’s amphibians are facing a new crisis, one that is caused by attacks by multiple pathogens,” said Professor Trent Garner of the Zoological Society of London, which is hostingthe conference. “We...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie science editor Tags: Amphibians Endangered species Environment World news Fungi Biology Science Animals Wildlife Source Type: news

Fossil record: Dippy the dinosaur proves huge attraction in Scotland
More than 373,000 people have visited replica diplodocus since it arrived in Glasgow in JanuaryDippy the dinosaur raises its elegant neck towards the vaulted ceiling of the Centre Hall in Glasgow ’s Kelvingrove Museum. The 21-metre-long replica diplodocus skeleton appears nonchalant in advance of the anticipated onrush of young fans during Scotland’s Easter school holidays.Since the Natural History Museum ’s much-loved exhibit arrived in January on the only Scottish stop of its three-year UK-wide tour, the reception has been rapturous, with more than 373,000 visitors so far, already besting the next most ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Libby Brooks Scotland correspondent Tags: Scotland Dinosaurs Glasgow UK news Museums Science Zoology Fossils Source Type: news

BCoN Report to Offer National Agenda for Biodiversity Collections Research and Education
The Biodiversity Collections Network (BCoN) will release its new report, Extending U.S. Biodiversity Collections to Promote Research and Education, at 9:00 AM eastern time on April 4, 2019, at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. You are invited to this event to learn more about this important report and what it means for science and society. The report is the outcome of a series of workshops and stakeholder conversations that BCoN has held over the past four years. Scientists familiar with the report have expressed enthusiasm for its recommendations. This event is free and open to the public. Space is limited. I...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Rejuvenation of aging cells helps to cure osteoarthritis through gene therapy
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Recently, scientists from the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Peking University and the Institute of Biophysics of CAS, found a protein factor, CBX4, safeguarded hMSCs against cellular senescence through the regulation of nucleolar architecture and function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Natural History Museum to start dinosaur dig in US
Project Mission Jurassic will excavate land in Wyoming where brachiosaurus and diplodocus have been unearthedThe Natural History Museum is embarking on its first major overseas dig since the 1980s in the hope of unearthing new Jurassic-era dinosaurs.The project, entitled Mission Jurassic, which will excavate a square mile of land in Wyoming, US, will involve a team from the Natural History Museum working alongside scientists from the Children ’s Museum of Indianapolis and the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, Netherlands.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Dinosaurs UK news US news World news Fossils Science Biology Zoology Source Type: news

The five: magnetoreceptive animals
Scientists have discovered that humans may be able to pick up on the Earth ’s magnetic field. Here are some other species with animal magnetismLast week, researchers from the California Institute of Technology announced that they believe humans have theability to pick up on the Earth ’s magnetic field– a power known as magnetoreception. In an experiment, participants’ brains were described as “freaking out” when the magnetic field was changed unexpectedly.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Zoology Biology Science Technology Source Type: news

Behind a lesbian furore over a famous palaeontologist lies a deeper truth | Tori Herridge and Becky Wragg Sykes
No one knows if Mary Anning had lovers. But what a new film does get right is the vital role women played in her lifeThe furore over a film portraying the 19th-century palaeontologist Mary Anning as having a female lover probably tells us more about ourselves than it does about historical accuracy onscreen. Francis Lee ’s Ammonite might not be a scrupulously backed-up biopic, but it may just hit on the one thing that so many other accounts of Anning, and other early women in science, have missed: the importance of friendships and collaborations.Anning, theworking-class woman whose fossil discoveries changed the world...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tori Herridge and Becky Wragg Sykes Tags: Kate Winslet Geology Science Dinosaurs Evolution Zoology Fossils UK news Film Source Type: news

Wildlife tourism may negatively affect African elephants' behavior
(Wiley) Increasing numbers of tourists are interested in observing wildlife such as African elephants, and income generated from tourism potentially aids in the protection of animals and their habitats. However, a new Journal of Zoology study reveals that wildlife tourism may be a stressor for free-ranging elephants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The five: back-from-the-brink species once thought extinct
From wild dogs to horned frogs, all manner of animals are still capable of keeping out of our sight, some for over 100 yearsThis week, scientists in South Americaspotted a rare frog previously thought to be extinct. The Tropical Herving research group found a colony of horned marsupial frogs in a recent expedition into the Choc ó rainforest. The species had last been seen in Ecuador in 2005. The frogs’ natural habitat is in the high canopy of the rainforest, threatened by deforestation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Inigo Alexander Tags: Extinct wildlife Zoology Animals World news Biology Science Technology Source Type: news

Scientists find routine allomaternal nursing in an Old World monkey
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A team of scientists led by Professor Li Ming at the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found widespread allomaternal nursing behavior in an Old World monkey, the golden snub-nosed monkey. Based on more than eight years of field observation of infants and their mothers at Shennongjia National Park, Central China, as well as analysis of the monkeys' reproductive histories, the study provides the first evidence of regular allomaternal nursing in golden snub-nosed monkeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why the zebra got its stripes: to deter flies from landing on it
Pattern seems to confuse flies, researchers who dressed horses up as zebras findThe mystery of how the zebra got its stripes might have been solved: researchers say the pattern appears to confuse flies, discouraging them from touching down for a quick bite.The study, published in the journalPlos One, involved horses, zebras, and horses dressed as zebras. The team said the research not only supported previous work suggesting stripes might act as an insect deterrent, but helped unpick why, revealing the patterns only produced an effect when the flies got close.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Evolution Science Animals World news UK news Zoology Biology Wildlife Environment Conservation Africa Source Type: news

Basics: Everywhere in the Animal Kingdom, Followers of the Milky Way
As scientists learn more about milk ’ s evolution and compositional variations, they are redefining what used to be a signature characteristic of mammals. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NATALIE ANGIER Tags: Milk Animal Behavior Mammals Spiders Insects Flies Beetles Breastfeeding Birds Parenting Biology and Biochemistry Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian National Zoological Park University of Bayreuth University of California, Dav Source Type: news

Rare tiger kills prospective mate in London at first meeting
For 10 days, the London Zoo kept its newly arrived male Sumatran tiger Asim in a separate enclosure from Melati, the female tiger who was supposed to become his mate.Zoologists gave them time to get used to each other's presence and smells, and waited for what they felt would be the right time... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news