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What sound do pandas make? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Jules Howard
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life ’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesA great frustration for those who study natural history is that the sounds made by almost every extinct creature that ever lived will never be heard by human ears. The best we know of the call of thedodo, for instance, is that, perhaps, its name was an onomatopoeic allusion to a two-noted pigeon-like “cooo”. Likewise, the best we know of thegreat auk, a flightless penguin-like bird of the northern hemisphere, is that it may or may not have made a “gurgling ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Zoology Biology Science Animals Source Type: news

Duck egg blue and oviraptor green: study reconstructs colour of dinosaur eggs
A new study of oviraptor eggshell fragments shows remarkable similarities between the reproductive biology of dinosaurs and birdsBird eggs come in a variety of colours. From the creamy and chalky whites in doves and pigeons to spotted yellow lapwing eggs and brown chicken eggs, to the blues of blackbirds and American robins. The striking colours and patterns have inspired artists, scientists and home decor makers fromAristotle tohigh-end jewellers. Thanks to palaeontology, we can now add oviraptor blue-green to the spectrum.Remarkably, only two chemical compounds bring about the whole spectrum of bird egg coloration and pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Dinosaurs Birds Animals Fossils Evolution Zoology Biology Science Palaeontology Source Type: news

Keeping moving -- flat worms shed light on role of migrating stem cells in cancer
(University of Oxford) A new study carried out by the University of Oxford has used flat worms to look at the role of migrating stem cells in cancer.Researchers from the Aboobaker lab in the Department of Zoology used the worms (planarians) which are known for their ability to regenerate their tissues and organs repeatedly. By understanding how stem cells are programmed to move, what activates them and how they follow a correct path, researchers may be able to design new treatments for cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 3, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Meet the New Spider Species Named After Bernie Sanders
What do Bernie Sanders, Barack Obama Michelle Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio and David Bowie have in common? Thanks to researchers at the University of Vermont, they all have a new species of spider named after them. Researchers gave the celebrity names to a group of tiny yellow spiders originally thought to be the same species. The Spintharus berniesandersi, for instance, is a tiny spider found in Cuba that measures just a millimeter long. Courtesy of Ingi Agnarsson/Agnarsson Lab Professor Ingi Agnarsson, who led the research project, explained to Sci-News why they gave the eight-legged creatures such recognizable names: &ldqu...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized animals Barack Obama Bernie Sanders David Bowie Leonardo DiCaprio Michelle Obama onetime Source Type: news

Caribbean spiders named for Barack Obama, Bernie Sanders David Bowie, and others
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society has identified and named 15 new species of spider in the Caribbean. Given the vernacular names 'smiley faced' spiders due to the distinctive markings on their backs, the new species have been given names including S. davidattenboroughi, S. barackobamai, and S.leonardodicaprioi. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Naked Ape at 50: ‘Its central claim has surely stood the test of time ‘
In October 1967, Desmond Morris published his landmark study of human behaviour and evolution. Here four experts assess what he got right – and wrongProfessor of evolutionary psychology at the University of OxfordContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin Dunbar, Angela Saini, Ben Garrod, Adam Rutherford Tags: Evolution Human biology Animal behaviour Science and nature Zoology Books Culture Source Type: news

Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs deaf to their own mating calls
Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear itHumans trying to chat each other up in a noisy nightclub may find verbal communication futile. But it appears even more pointless forpumpkin toadlets after scientists discovered that females have lost the ability to hear the sound of male mating calls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Amphibians Animal behaviour Wildlife Zoology Environment Science Biology World news Source Type: news

Vegetarian dinosaurs sometimes strayed for a shellfish snack – study
Analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceansSome dinosaurs may not have been the strict vegetarians that palaeontologists thought they were.New analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceans, according to a new study published Thursday in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Science Zoology Fossils Biology Source Type: news

Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs that are deaf to their own mating calls
Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear itHumans trying to chat each other up in a noisy nightclub may find verbal communication futile. But it appears even more pointless forpumpkin toadlets after scientists discovered that females have lost the ability to hear the sound of male mating calls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Amphibians Animal behaviour Wildlife Zoology Environment Science Biology World news Source Type: news

Fish may use different behaviors to protect against parasites
(Wiley) New research indicates that fish may adapt their behavior to defend against parasite infection. The findings are published in the Journal of Zoology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Welfare of zoo animals set to improve
(University of Surrey) The wellbeing of zoological animals is set to improve following the successful trial of a new welfare assessment grid, a new study in the journal Veterinary Record reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fathers can influence the sex of their offspring, scientists show
(University of Oxford) It has traditionally been thought that in mammals only mothers are able to influence the sex of their offspring.But a new study in wild mice led by Dr Aurelio Malo of Oxford University's Department of Zoology has shown that fathers can, in fact, influence sex ratios. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope for improving protection of the reticulated python
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Trading in skins of the reticulated python is such a lucrative business that illegal exports are rising sharply and existing trade restrictions are being circumvented on a large scale. This is endangering the stability of populations. Therefore, researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the Royal Zoological Society Scotland are developing genetic methods for tracking down individual origins and potential trade routes of the skins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chilesaurus is the dinosaur discovery of the century | Brian Switek
This herbivorous creature could be the missing link in the dinosaur family tree, changing everything we think we know about their evolutionChilesaurus doesn ’t look like the kind of dinosaur that would kick up much of a fuss. The Jurassic saurian – named for the country, not the tasty peppers – was a small, bipedal herbivore that munched on plants over 150m years ago. It didn’t have nasty teeth, crazy horns, or the immense body size that typical ly launch the careers of Mesozoic celebrities. The creature’s secret is more subtle, and plays into a controversial reshuffling of the dinosaur family...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Brian Switek Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Science UK news Source Type: news

Monster mash: does the Frankenstein dinosaur solve the mystery of the Jurassic family tree?
Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, named after the seven-year-old who discovered it, changes everything we thought we knew about dino evolution …Name: Chilesaurus diegosuarezi.Nickname: The Frankenstein dinosaur.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Dinosaurs Palaeontology Evolution Fossils Biology Zoology Science Source Type: news

Fish confusing plastic debris in ocean for food, study finds
Behavioural evidence suggests marine organisms are not just ingesting microplastics by accident but actively seeking them out as foodFish may be actively seeking out plastic debris in the oceans as the tiny pieces appear to smell similar to their natural prey, new research suggests.The fish confuse plastic for an edible substance because microplastics in the oceans pick up a covering of biological material, such as algae, that mimics the smell of food, according to thestudy published on Wednesdayin the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Marine life Plastics Fishing Environment Wildlife Oceans Science Zoology Source Type: news

Fish mistaking plastic debris in ocean for food, study finds
Behavioural evidence suggests marine organisms are not just ingesting microplastics by accident but actively seeking them out as foodFish may be actively seeking out plastic debris in the oceans as the tiny pieces appear to smell similar to their natural prey, new research suggests.The fish confuse plastic for an edible substance because microplastics in the oceans pick up a covering of biological material, such as algae, that mimics the smell of food, according to thestudy published on Wednesdayin the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Marine life Plastics Fishing Environment Wildlife Oceans Science Zoology Source Type: news

Sir Patrick Bateson obituary
Leading scientist who focused on the biological origins of animal behaviourSir Patrick Bateson, who has died aged 79, was a scientist whose work advanced the understanding of the biological origins of behaviour. He will also be remembered as a man of immense warmth and kindness, whose success as a leader, teacher and administrator of science owed much to his collaborative spirit, generosity and good humour.He was a key figure in ethology – the biological study of animal behaviour. As well as being a conceptual thinker who revelled in painting the big theoretical picture, he was an accomplished experimental scientist....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Paul Martin Tags: Science Zoology Animal behaviour Animals Biology Norway US news University of Cambridge Source Type: news

Scientists discover unknown virus in 'throwaway' DNA
(University of Oxford) A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses.In research published in the journal Virus Evolution, scientists from Oxford University's Department of Zoology have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in fish blood or tissue samples, and could be used to identify viruses in a range of different species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Wildlife royalties -- a future for conservation?
(University of Oxford) Should people who profit from the cultural representation of wildlife pay towards conservation?That is the question asked in new research conducted by zoologists from Oxford University's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Paleoart: the strange history of dinosaurs in art – in pictures
Since the early 19th century, artists have depicted colourful – if sometimes fictional – dinosaurs and prehistoric environments, mingling science with unbridled fantasy. This art is the subject of a new book: PaleoartContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: All images courtesy of Taschen Tags: Science and nature Dinosaurs Books Culture Art Art and design Illustration Zoology Fossils Evolution Source Type: news

Too many bats are being killed for research
(Wiley) The work of zoologists worldwide is often an important asset for biodiversity protection, but a new article notes that scientists kill many bats -- even of threatened species -- to study them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists unlock planthoppers' potential to control future crop disease outbreaks
(eLife) Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Zoology have discovered how a severe rice virus reproduces inside the small brown planthopper, a major carrier of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Strong performance in Journal Citation Reports reaffirms Wiley as leading society publishing partner
Wiley’s performance in the 2017 release of Clarivate Analytics’ Journal Citation Reports (JCR) remains strong, maintaining its position as #3 in terms of the number of titles indexed, articles published and citations received. Overall, 1,214 Wiley journals were included in the reports (+9 from last year), of which 57% were society publications – strengthening Wiley’s position as the world’s leading society publishing partner. Wiley journals were ranked #1 in 26 subject categories, and achieved 363 top-10 category rankings. Particular success stories include the continued high performance of CA...
Source: News from STM - July 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Tardigrades: Earth ’s unlikely beacon of life that can survive a cosmic cataclysm
Microscopic creatures reassure scientists complete eradication of life on the planet is extremely unlikelyWhether it is a supernova or an asteroid impact, should a cosmic calamity strike, it seems there will be at least one form of life left: a tubby, microscopic animal with the appearance of a crumpled hoover bag.The creatures, known as tardigrades, are staggeringly hardy animals, a millimetre or less in size, with species living in wet conditions that range from mountain tops to chilly ocean waters to moss and lichen on land.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Zoology Science Astronomy Planets Exoplanets Source Type: news

'Truly unique': lioness adopts and nurses leopard cub
No wild cat has ever been observed nursing a cub from another species – the event may be the result of the Tanzanian lioness having lost her own litterA lioness has been spotted nursing a tiny leopard cub in Tanzania, the first time a wild cat is known to have adopted a cub from another species.The five-year old lioness, called Nosikitok is closely monitored by conservationists in the Ngorongoro conservation area and is known to have had a litter of her own in mid to late June.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Wildlife World news Environment Conservation Tanzania Africa Zoology Science Source Type: news

So long, Dippy: museum's blue whale seeks to inspire love of living world
Natural History Museum in London signals urgency of wildlife crisis by replacing dinosaur centrepiece with species alive todayIn the hot summer of 1976, when Richard Sabin was 10, he went on a trip with his Birmingham primary school to theNatural History Museum in London. Blown away by the scale of what he was seeing, the wide-eyed schoolboy was told by an attendant that if he wanted to see something really big he should make his way to the mammal hall, where the skeletons of a number of whales, including an enormous blue whale, were displayed.“Another gallery attendant went past, and I stopped her and said, ‘A...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Esther Addley Tags: Science Natural History Museum Whales Environment Marine life Museums Culture Wildlife Cetaceans Conservation BBC David Attenborough Television & radio Dinosaurs Fossils Zoology Biology London UK news Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without trave...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 11, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

When very hungry caterpillars turn into cannibals
Research shows that defensive chemicals emitted by plants cause armyworms to turn on each otherCaterpillars turn into cannibals and eat each other when plants deploy defensive chemicals to make their foliage less appetising, research has revealed.While it was already known that caterpillars of many species munch on each other, and that plants have a range of defence mechanisms, it was not clear whether the two were linked.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Insects Environment Wildlife Animals Zoology Science Source Type: news

Thought Leader: Quick Queries with Dr. Carl Clark, Mental Health Center of Denver (Video)
Carl Clark never planned to be the CEO of anything, but today he ’s the president and CEO of the Mental Health Center of Denver. As a young man, Clark was interested in anything that got him outdoors, so he studied zoology in college. It wasn’t until he had decided to pursue psychology instead that he found out about his dad’s bipolar disorder. “I feel like we got lucky, my family, that my dad got access to [mental health] services, because not a lot of people do,” Clark said. “In fact,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - July 6, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Kathleen Lavine Source Type: news

Thought Leader: Quick Queries with Dr. Carl Clark, Mental Health Center of Denver (Video)
Carl Clark never planned to be the CEO of anything, but today he ’s the president and CEO of the Mental Health Center of Denver. As a young man, Clark was interested in anything that got him outdoors, so he studied zoology in college. It wasn’t until he had decided to pursue psychology instead that he found out about his dad’s bipolar disorder. “I feel like we got lucky, my family, that my dad got access to [mental health] services, because not a lot of people do,” Clark said. “In fact,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 6, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Kathleen Lavine Source Type: news

Feathered dinosaurs from China visit the UK | Susannah Lydon
An exhibition including iconic – and infamous – feathered dinosaur specimens comes to Europe for the first timeFeathered dinosaurs are rarely out of the news and area regular topic for our blog. For those in the UK, there ’s a rare opportunity to see some of the original feathered dinosaur specimens this summer in Nottingham.The exhibition – Dinosaurs of China: Ground Shakers to Feathered Flyers – opened on 1 July at Wollaton Hall, home of theNottingham Natural History Museum. The ground-shaking sauropodMamenchisaurus, mounted 13.5m tall in a rearing pose, is a spectacular centrepiece. But, fr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Science Evolution Zoology Biology Source Type: news

Bone to pick: volunteers invited to rebuild 157-year-old whale skeleton
Whale Weekender at Grant Zoology Museum calls on public to clean then reassemble bones of 8-metre mammalThe public is invited to help reassemble a giant jigsaw in a London museum, 157 years after two Somerset fishermen went out to catch a “great fish” and brought back a northern bottlenosed whale more than eight metres (26ft) long.Their catch was a local sensation: the carcass went on a west country tour then the skeleton was displayed for years hanging from the ceiling of the museum in Weston-super-Mare.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Museums Whales Archaeology Cetaceans Environment Marine life Wildlife Culture Education Science London UK news Source Type: news

Dinosaur skeleton discovered under Surrey brick factory
Near-complete fossilised skeleton of 132m-year-old creature, believed to be an Iguanodon, has been taken to special laboratory for further investigationThe near-complete fossilised skeleton of a dinosaur, thought to have lived about 132m years ago, has been unearthed at a brick factory in Surrey.Paleontologists say they discovered the bones during a routine visit to the site of the Wienerberger quarry in February. The first clues came when the team looked at rock that had been turned up by a bulldozer at the site and discovered a couple of tail vertebrae.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science UK news Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Zoology Source Type: news

Rare dinosaur remains discovered under Surrey brick factory
Near-complete fossilised skeleton of 132m-year-old creature, believed to be an Iguanodon, has been taken to special laboratory for further investigationThe near-complete fossilised skeleton of a dinosaur, thought to have lived about 132m years ago, has been unearthed at a brick factory in Surrey.Paleontologists say they discovered the bones during a routine visit to the site of the Wienerberger quarry in February. The first clues came when the team looked at rock that had been turned up by a bulldozer at the site and discovered a couple of tail vertebrae.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science UK news Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Zoology Source Type: news

Pesticides damage survival of bee colonies, landmark study shows
The world ’s largest ever field trial demonstrates widely used insecticides harm both honeybees and wild bees, increasing calls for a banWidely used insecticides damage the survival of honeybee colonies, the world ’s largest ever field trial has shown for the first time, as well as harming wild bees.The farm-based research, along with a second new study, also suggests widespread contamination of entire landscapes and a toxic “cocktail effect” from multiple pesticides.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Pesticides Bees Farming Insects Wildlife Environment World news Zoology Science Source Type: news

Dinosaurs ’ sensitive snouts enabled courtship ‘face stroking’, study suggests
Fossilised skull scans reveal neurovascular canal that might have enabled precision-feeding, and face-biting ‘to make a point’Dinosaurs ’ faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought and may have helped them feed more carefully or woo potential mates, according to new research.Experts from the University of Southampton used advanced X-ray and 3D-imaging techniques to look inside the fossilised skull ofNeovenator salerii– a large carnivorous land-based dinosaur found on the Isle of Wight, and found evidence that it possessed an extremely sensitive snout of a kind previously only ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Dinosaurs UK news Science Evolution Zoology Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without trave...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 26, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
Bison, bluebells, bumble bees and beavers are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Conservation Safaris Source Type: news

Life won't find a way: how an ostrich fossil halted plans for a real-life Jurassic Park | Elsa Panciroli
Despite dinosaurs having met extinction long ago, our dreams of reviving them refuse to die. Recent events imply we may have to settle for resurrecting poultryThere are some ideas that just won ’t die. Like the villain in a movie, even when they’ve been shot with the bullets of refutation, scalded by heated discourse, and pushed off into the pool of disproven theories, these ideas still claw their way back, bedraggled and screaming, to attack us one more time.If there is one idea in palaeontology that typifies this tiresome cycle, it is the resurrection of the dinosaurs. “Can we ever bring them back?&rdqu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elsa Panciroli Tags: Science Evolution Biology Dinosaurs Fossils Zoology Source Type: news

What if dinosaurs were still alive? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Brian Switek
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life ’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesDinosaurs dominated terrestrial life on this planet for over 130m years. If it hadn ’t been for a wayward asteroid, the reign of Tyrannosaurus rex and its ilk could have lasted for at least another 66m. In fact, let’s presume for a moment that thecosmic boulder that ended the Cretaceous period totally missed Earth and allowed dinosaurs to survive to the present. What would life be like now?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Brian Switek Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Science Source Type: news

'We're her sort of mum': behind the scenes at Taronga zoo | photo-essay
We join the keepers at Sydney ’s Taronga zoo as they nurture and train their newest arrivals, including Maiya the red panda and Kamini the pygmy hippo. A photo-essay by Jonny WeeksLily and Blossom are about to be toilet trained at Taronga zoo. The two young sugar gliders are curled up together inside a wooden box within a staff bathroom while trainer Suzie Lemon is trying to coax them out with the promise of a sugary, sap-like treat. Lily eventually emerges and promptly pees all over the floor but Lemon doesn ’t seem to mind. After all, they’re not here for that kind of toilet training.“We’re ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jonny Weeks Tags: Animals Zoology Biology Science Sydney Australia news Source Type: news

'We're sort of her mum': behind the scenes at Taronga zoo | photo-essay
We join the keepers at Sydney ’s Taronga zoo as they nurture and train their newest arrivals, including Maiya the red panda and Kamini the pygmy hippo. A photo-essay by Jonny WeeksLily and Blossom are about to be toilet trained at Taronga zoo. The two young sugar gliders are curled up together inside a wooden box within a staff bathroom while trainer Suzie Lemon is trying to coax them out with the promise of a sugary, sap-like treat. Lily eventually emerges and promptly pees all over the floor but Lemon doesn ’t seem to mind. After all, they’re not here for that kind of toilet training.“We’re ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jonny Weeks Tags: Animals Zoology Biology Science Sydney Australia news New South Wales Source Type: news

Taylor & Francis partners with The Conversation Africa to boost engagement with African research
Taylor & Francis and The Conversation Africa announce a new partnership to facilitate African researchers increasing public engagement with their work and expertise. By acting as Funding Partner, Taylor & Francis will work with The Conversation Africa to highlight essential African research and offer T&F authors, journal editors, and publishing partners closer links with the African news website. The Conversation is an international network of news websites, addressing the news agenda from an academic perspective. TC-Africa was established in 2015, joining Conversation websites in Australia, the UK, France and ...
Source: News from STM - June 13, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without trave...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 12, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

William 'Skip' Baker Joins White River Medical Center (Movers & Shakers)
Dr. William "Skip" Baker has been hired as medical director and Dr. Danyale Wallace has been appointed assistant medical director in the emergency department at White River Medical Center in Batesville. Baker previously was the director of emergency services and trauma and an emergency department physician at NEA Baptist Memorial Hospital in Jonesboro. Baker earned a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture degree from Arkansas State University in Jonesboro and received his medical degree from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. He also completed a three-year residency in emergency medicine ...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - June 12, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Epigenetic signaling axis regulates proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem/progenitor cells
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) In a recent study published in Stem Cell Reports, a team led by Drs. LIU Changmei and TENG Zhaoqian from the State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, found a novel epigenetic signaling axis (composed of PRC1, microRNA, and PRC2) that regulates self-renewal and proliferation of NSPCs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How the Galapagos cormorant lost its ability to fly
The flightless Galapagos cormorant is one of a diverse array of animals that live on the Galapagos Islands, which piqued Charles Darwin ’s scientific curiosity in the 1830s. He hypothesized that altered evolutionary pressures may have contributed to the loss of the ability to fly in birds like the Galapagos cormorant.In a new study unraveling the cormorant ’s DNA, UCLA scientists discovered genetic changes that transpired during the past 2 million years and contributed to the bird’s inability to fly. Interestingly, when these same genes go awry in humans, they cause bone-development disorders called skele...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

An Endangered Lizard From Indonesia May Hold The Key To Treating Superbugs
Komodo dragons, the 10-foot, 300-pound lizards found in Indonesia, do not bite humans unless attacked, but when they do, it can prove deadly. Not only is the venom in their teeth potentially fatal, they may also harbor bacteria in their mouths that is dangerous to their prey (typically, deer and pigs). The question of whether Komodo dragons deliver fatal bacterial infections to their prey when they bite has been somewhat controversial: A 2013 study, refuting previously accepted common wisdom, swabbed the mouths of 16 captive Komodo dragons and found they had less bacteria than other predators, such as lions.  Nonethel...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Imperiled Indonesian Lizard May Hold The Key To Fighting Superbugs
Komodo dragons, the 10-foot, 300-pound lizards found in Indonesia, do not bite humans unless attacked, but when they do, it can prove deadly. Not only is the venom in their teeth potentially fatal, they may also harbor bacteria in their mouths that is dangerous to their prey (typically, deer and pigs). The question of whether Komodo dragons deliver fatal bacterial infections to their prey when they bite has been somewhat controversial: A 2013 study, refuting previously accepted common wisdom, swabbed the mouths of 16 captive Komodo dragons and found they had less bacteria than other predators, such as lions.  Nonethel...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news