The ‘grieving’ orca mother? Projecting emotions on animals is a sad mistake | Jules Howard
When we interpret animal behaviour as humanlike, we risk simply seeing ourselves – which demeans us and themAnd so, the killer whale known as J35 is back to her old self. She is no longer carrying the dead body of a calf she heldaloft in the water for more than two weeks. Her so-calledtour of grief has ended, to the relief of a global audience who had become wrapped up in this heart-wrenching animal drama. Great news, right? Sure. Yet I have a strange feeling in my stomach. It ’s a familiar one. The pedant in me is stirring, eager to get us to consider what we know about animals and what we don’t – ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Whales Animal behaviour Animals Zoology World news Mammals Death and dying Science Cetaceans Wildlife Source Type: news

‘She’s Clearly Reacting to a Loss’: Experts Say Killer Whale Carrying Her Dead Calf for 17 Days May Actually Be Grieving
A mother orca whale is still carrying the body of her calf 17 days after it died, in what some experts say may be an unprecedented testament to the strength of the species’ familial bonds. The whale, known as Tahlequah or J35, is one of just 75 Southern Resident killer whales left in the ocean, and her calf — which died minutes after it was born last month — was the group’s first live birth since 2015. Tahlequah has been spotted in waters off the Pacific Northwest multiple times over the past two weeks, often pushing her calf’s corpse through the water or swimming with it balancing on her fore...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Wildlife Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A Sumatran orangutan, fireflies mating and a sea lion cooling off in record-breaking Californian heat are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Animals World news Zoology Environment Biology Science Source Type: news

Explore 1 Of The World's Largest Collections Of Bird Eggs And Nests
The Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo, Calif., houses one of the largest collections of birds eggs and nests in the world. As part of our summer road trip collaboration with Atlas Obscura, we explore the collection and meet the scientists who run the foundation. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dylan Thuras Source Type: news

Explore One Of The World's Largest Collections Of Bird Eggs And Nests
The Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo, Calif., houses one of the largest collections of birds eggs and nests in the world. As part of our summer road trip collaboration with Atlas Obscura, we explore the collection and meet the scientists who run the foundation. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dylan Thuras Source Type: news

Book clinic: which books best capture our relationship with animals?
Carl Safina ’s educated anthropomorphism and Alex Preston’s vivid bird portraits are the wild stuff to illuminate our place in the natural worldWhich books best depict our relationship with other species without being oversentimental or too philosophical?Carlos Lugo-Ortiz, 52, professor of biology and entomology, Ponce, Puerto RicoCharles Foster, author of the Baillie Gifford-longlistedBeing a Beast (Profile, £8.99), writes:The stipulation “over-sentimental” indicates, I assume, impatience with anthropomorphism. I’m impatient with that impatience. Anthropomorphism, as the American biolog...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Charles Foster Tags: Science and nature books Zoology Biology Culture Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A quarter of a million roosting gannets in Yorkshire, an orca whale mother keeps her dead calf afloat and Norwegian reindeer seek cool in busy road tunnels – it’s the week in wildlifeContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 3, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Birds fish Bees Coral Natural disasters and extreme weather Whales Plastics Source Type: news

Can science save Australia ’s quoll from a deadly diet?
Targeted genetics will help a threatened species spurn a poisonous toad mealAustralia ’s northern quoll, one of the world’s rarest carnivores, has developed a feeding habit that puts its very existence in peril. The squirrel-sized marsupial turns out to have a fondness for the poisonous flesh of invasive cane toads, introduced into Australia in the 1930s. And this appetite has wi ped out vast numbers of the species across the country. As a result, the northern quoll is now considered to be nationally endangered.But scientists have launched a remarkable project aimed at saving the little nocturnal hunters. They ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science Editor Tags: Endangered species Science Zoology Conservation Australia news Genetics Biodiversity World news Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A new species of spider, frolicking hares and migratory sea turtles are among this week ’s pick of images from our overheated natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 27, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Scientific procedures involving animals at lowest level since 2010
But animal rights groups say more should be done to reduce those bred with genetic alterationsScientific procedures involving animals are at their lowest level since 2010, but animal rights groups say the government is not doing enough to reduce the number of animals bred with genetic alterations.New statistics released by the Home Office show there were almost 3.8m scientific procedures involving animals in 2017, a 4% drop on the previous year. These included 1.89m experiments on live animals – with reasons ranging from legally required drug testing to surgical training.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Animal experimentation Science Animal welfare Animals UK news Medical research Zoology Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 9, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Insectivorous birds consume annually as much energy as the city of New York
(University of Basel) The world's insectivorous birds consume annually 400 to 500 million tons of prey and thereby use as much energy as the megacity New York. This is demonstrated by zoologists in the journal 'The Science of Nature.' Especially in forested areas, insectivorous birds play a significant role in the suppression of pest insects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When plants break up: Understanding cooperative relationships between soil microbes
(Natural News) Who knew even plants could “break up?” According to a study, even though plants can cooperate, there are also times when these cooperative relationships break down. Gijsbert Werner, Postdoctoral Fellow, and Stuart West, Professor of Evolutionary Biology, both in the Department of Zoology at the University of Oxford, explained that plants have various “below-ground... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ZooKeys celebrates 10 years at the forefront of zoological research with issue No. 770
(Pensoft Publishers) The open-access scholarly journal ZooKeys marks its 10th anniversary on the awe-inspiring 4th of July. Published today, its 770th issue features a special Editorial, highlighting the milestones and achievements of ZooKeys over the last decade. It accompanies eight research articles sharing novel information about diverse animal taxa and zoological subjects from all corners of the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Urban wildlife
Many ostensibly rural creatures are thriving in our towns and cities, while adapting to surviveLast week,researchers revealed that bumblebees fare better in urban rather than agricultural environments. City colonies produced more males and reached a larger size, had more food stores and survived longer. They concluded that urban environments provide longer-lived, more varied flowers than intensively farmed agricultural areas.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Wildlife Zoology Biology Science Environment Cities Source Type: news

Research shows benefit of giant panda conservation far exceeds cost
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) To determine the value of panda conservation, a research team led by Prof. WEI Fuwen from the Institute of Zoology, together with colleagues from other research organizations, cooperated to assess the value of ecosystem services from giant panda reserves for the first time. They found that the value provided by the giant pandas and forested habitat within nature reserves is about 10-27 times the conservation cost of giant pandas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 25, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Tongue-tied: T rex couldn't stick out its tongue
Researchers say many dinosaurs ’ tongues were anchored to the floors of their mouths and unable to waggleThe fearsome creatures ofJurassic World might chase you, kill you and rip you limb from limb, but there is one thing aT rex couldn ’t do: stick out its tongue.WhileHollywood depictions of dinosaurs often show the creatures open-mouthed with tongues waving, researchers have discovered that many of them were probably tongue-tied, their tongues firmly anchored to the floors of their mouths and unable to waggle around.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Science Evolution Zoology Jurassic Park Jurassic World Source Type: news

Cambridge zoology museum to reopen
Sir David Attenborough to tour new premises that showcase the extinct moa bird ’s feathersWhen SirDavid Attenborough opens the University of Cambridge ’s zoology museum this week, the proud curators will show him their fabulous discovery.It ’s fair to say the casual visitor might wonder why they are so excited by the scruffy frame containing a few cobwebby grey-brown wisps, discovered during a £4.1m redevelopment of the museum.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Zoology Conservation Museums Cambridge Biology Culture Environment Science UK news Animals Source Type: news

Did dinosaurs get dandruff?
Palaeontologists studying the evolution of dinosaurs ’ skin and feathers think they didAs a regular reader of this blog, you are well aware that dinosaurs had feathers (unless you are a certain film franchise). Dinosaurs were covered in patches of fuzz, proto-floof, shook their tail feathers, and in some cases displayed full-fledged plumage. Over the last decade, exceptionally preserved fossils and intense genetic study have taught us a lot about feather evolution. But what do we know about the evolution of the skin of dinosaurs and early birds?Vertebrateskin consists of several layers of cells making up the epidermi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Science Evolution Zoology Palaeontology Source Type: news

Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

When size does matter – Big Beasts: Last of the Giants – in pictures
Patrick Aryee ’s gets up close and personal with some of the world’s biggest creatures in his new three-part series. Episode one airs on Sky1, Wednesday 13 June, 9pmContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 11, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Science Zoology Biology Television & radio Culture Source Type: news

540m-year-old bug tracks are oldest footprints ever discovered
Ancient prints bring scientists closer to understanding what were the first creatures to evolve pairs of legsThe oldest known footprints on Earth, left by an ancient creepy-crawly more than 500 million years ago, have been discovered in China.The tracks were left by a primitive ancestor of modern-day insects or worms, according to scientists. Precisely what the creature looked like is a mystery, though: nothing this old with legs has been discovered to date.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Zoology Science Insects Evolution Archaeology China Source Type: news

Country diary: butterflies instinctively make chemistry sexy
Wyre Forest, Worcestershire: The male pearl-bordered fritillaries were laying pheromone trails low along the trackThe amber flicker materialised in air so saturated that it steamed through the trees, sauna hot. The orange light became two, spinning around each other only a metre above the ride, knotting and unknotting in the air. These weresmall pearl-bordered fritillarybutterflies,Boloria selene, males in a dogfight over territory.After each skirmish they separated, flying low in opposite directions, occasionally stopping to feed on bugle flowers or resting for a brief moment. Only then was it possible to see the black pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Paul Evans Tags: Butterflies Trees and forests Animal behaviour Biology Environment Insects Wildlife Animals Science Worcester holidays Travel Summer UK news Zoology Source Type: news

'New' dinosaur species fetches €2m at Paris auction
Scientists say 150m-year-old skeleton may be new species of carnivorous allosaurusThe skeleton of an extremely rare form of dinosaur has been sold for more than €2m (£1.8m) at the Eiffel Tower in Paris.The bones of what scientists believe may bea new species of the carnivorous allosaurus were discovered during a dig in Wyoming, US, in 2013.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse in Paris Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution France Biology Fossils Science Zoology Europe World news Paris Archaeology Source Type: news

Speculative biology: understanding the past and predicting our future
A new edition of After Man by Dougal Dixon, a landmark piece of speculative biology which influenced a generation of palaeontologists, has been releasedIn 1981, a remarkable book was published:After Man: A Zoology of the Future, by Dougal Dixon. As a child of the eighties, growing up in a science fiction bubble where daleks, vogons and the fighting machines of the War of the Worlds were at least as concrete to me as anything happening in the real world, After Man presented a biologically-themed alternative world to lose myself in.The premise of the book is simple: take the Earth today, remove the humans, and let evolution ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Science fiction books Evolution Biology Palaeontology Fossils Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers this Summer and Help Inform Science Policy
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 30, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Oldest known case of dandruff found in 125m-year-old dinosaur
Scientists have discovered fossilised dandruff on the skin of a feathered microraptorThe oldest known case of dandruff has been identified in a small feathered dinosaur that roamed the Earth about 125m years ago.Paleontologists found tiny flakes of fossilised skin on acrow-sized microraptor, a meat-eating dinosaur that hadwings on all four of its limbs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Dinosaurs Science Palaeontology Fossils Evolution Zoology Biology World news UK news Source Type: news

Palaeontologist Steve Brusatte: we owe Jurassic Park a debt of gratitude
The leading fossils expert says we are learning new things daily about the dinosaurs thanks to technological advances – and that film…There are a few precautions to bear in mind when approaching a palaeontologist. The first, and perhaps most crucial, is don ’t mention Ross fromFriends. It ’s not funny and it’s not clever and it really won ’t be appreciated. Don’t suggest that dinosaurs couldn’t have been evolutionary successes because they’re extinct. And do not, under any circumstances, refer to someone with outdated attitudes as a “dinosaur”.“I...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Dinosaurs Palaeontology Fossils Zoology Evolution Science Source Type: news

Rare dinosaur skeleton for sale – along with a chance to name species
Skeleton of unknown theropod is 70% complete and expected to fetch more than €1.2m in Paris auctionAnyone with a spare million euros or two will have the opportunity to own a unique dinosaur skeleton next month, and even to name it, if scientists can show it is a new species.Scientists say the skeleton of the species of theropod – or three-toed dinosaur – dates from the late Jurassic period about 155m years ago, give or take a million or so years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kim Willsher in Paris Tags: Dinosaurs France Europe World news Zoology Science Palaeontology Source Type: news

Rare dinosaur skeleton for sale – along with the right to name species
Skeleton of unknown therapod is 70% complete and expected to fetch more than €1.2m in Paris auctionAnyone with a spare million euros or two will have the opportunity to not only own a unique species of dinosaur skeleton next month, but to name it.Scientists say the skeleton of the species of therapod – or three-toed dinosaur – dates from the late Jurassic period about 155m years ago, give or take a million or so years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kim Willsher in Paris Tags: Dinosaurs France Europe World news Zoology Science Palaeontology Source Type: news

Beware the long face: horses remember your mood
Horses are wary of people who were angry-looking if they meet them again, and more positive to people who they last saw smilingThe following news is straight from the horse ’s mouth: our equine companions can remember human facial expressions, and an angry grimace will leave a horse more wary of that individual, scientists claim.The research follows previous work by the team from University of Sussex which compiled adirectory of horse facial expressions,and revealed that Black Beautycan read your emotions– a phenomenon also seen indogs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Zoology Biology Science Animals Psychology Source Type: news

Who Cares If They're Cute? This Zoologist Accepts Animals On Their Own Terms
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lulu Garcia-Navarro Source Type: news

Murder most fowl: Oxford dodo 'shot in the back of the head'
Revelation astonishes experts, who thought the renowned bird lived out its life in London as a money-spinning curiosityWith its plump head and bulbous beak, the renownedremains of a dodo at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History have long captivated visitors, Lewis Carroll among them. Now researchers say they have uncovered how the dodo died – a discovery that makes the old bird’s past curiouser and curiouser.Researchers used a form of CT scanning and sophisticated software to probe the anatomy and habits of the Oxford dodo - the world ’s best preserved specimen of the bird – anddiscovered ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Zoology Birds Endangered species Wildlife University of Oxford Science Biology Animals Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A newly hatched turtle, a roaming peacock and egrets in China are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Guy Lane Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

UC Berkeley's massive egg collection aids project up for Webby
(University of California - Berkeley) Why are bird eggs so varied in shape? Some are elliptical, others asymmetrical. Some are both, some -- like the spherical egg of the hawk-owl -- are neither. A team of designers at Science worked with curators at UC Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology to categorize egg from 49,000 photos in the collection. They found that egg length and shape relate to body size and flying habits. Their data visualization is now up for a Webby award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NSB Announces Public Service Award Winners
The National Science Board (NSB) has announced that Dr. Jane Lubchenco, distinguished university professor and marine studies advisor to the President at Oregon State University, will receive the 2018 Vannevar Bush Award. The award recognizes lifetime achievement for pursuits to improve the welfare of mankind and the nation through public-service activities in science, technology and public policy. Lubchenco is an environmental scientist and marine ecologist with experience in science, academia, as well as government. She has a diverse background in ecology, zoology, marine biology, ocean management, and public policy. Lu...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Green-haired turtle that breathes through its genitals added to endangered list
With its punky green mohican the striking Mary river turtle joins a new ZSL list of the world ’s most vulnerable reptilesIt sports a green mohican, fleshy finger-like growths under its chin and can breathe through its genitals.The Mary river turtle is one of the most striking creatures on the planet, and it is also one of the most endangered.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham and agencies Tags: Endangered species Zoology World news Animals Conservation Environment Science Wildlife Source Type: news

Happening Tomorrow! Citizen Science in Libraries: Fostering Community Connections on Citizen Science Day and Beyond
Are you interested in citizen science? Are you looking for new ways to engage with your community members, and would you like to encourage science discovery with more of your users? If you answered yes to any of the above, then don’t miss this exciting PSR webinar featuring Darlene Cavalier, professor of practice at Arizona State University and the founder of SciStarter, a citizen science database and platform. Darlene will describe several citizen science projects in public libraries in Arizona that are part of an IMLS grant, and she’ll share resources and information to spark ideas for your library. Citizen s...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 3, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Education Source Type: news

Dinosaur footprints found on Skye
Tracks of meat-eating dinosaurs found on Scottish island, shedding light on behaviours during Middle Jurassic periodIt ’s now a windswept island boasting pine martens, red deer and puffins. But 170 million years ago, some very different beasts were leaving their mark on the Isle of Skye.Researchers have unearthed a new site of about 50 tracks, some as big as a car tyre, from dinosaurs that roamed the island during the Middle Jurassic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Isle of Skye holidays Scotland UK news Zoology Source Type: news

Argonauts: the Astronauts of the Sea
How argonaut cephalopods evolved their own architecture to return to the open oceanCephalopod molluscs, the group of animals that includes octopuses, nautiluses, bobtail squid and cuttlefish amongst its living members, is a small but highly diverse group of animals. The group boastsocean giants, colour and shape changing octopuses,luminous ink squirters, transparent deep sea squid,aquarium escape artists, animals that mimic other animals, giant eyed vampire squid and they ’ve even conquered the air in species that fly,yes fly (Muramatsu et al. 2013).In short, it ’s really hard to stand out at a cephalopod party...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Carnall Tags: Palaeontology Fossils Biology Science Evolution Zoology Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A thirsty wolf, an albatross chick and a family of capybaras are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Compiled by Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Fantastic beasts: everything you need to know about conservation studies
The conservation sector requires postgrads with passion, curiosity and a commitment to scienceGiving a new tamarin monkey a health check or investigating why a gemsbok died are some of the more hands-on activities on theMSc in wild animal health at the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London (ZSL). Wild animal care and conservation are fiercely competitive areas and a postgraduate course combined with volunteering in the field will boost your career chances no end, say course leaders.As awareness of the fragility of ecosystems grows, universities around the country are seeing a rise in interest in conservation-f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Helena Pozniak Tags: Postgraduates Professional supplements Students Higher education Conservation Biology Science Careers Zoology Source Type: news

Archaeopteryx 'flew in bursts like a pheasant', scientists say
The winged Late Jurassic creature would take to the air in frenetic, flapping bounds, fossil x-rays showArchaeopteryx, one of life on Earth ’s first stabs at building a bird, evaded predators and cleared obstacles on the ground by bursting into flight like a startled pheasant, a new analysis suggests.High-resolution x-ray images of the creature ’s skeleton reveal tell-tale similarities with the bones of birds that cannot glide or soar but instead take to the air in frenetic, flapping bounds, scientists say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Archaeopteryx Science Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Zoology Palaeontology Source Type: news

ZooKeys special: Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Myriapodology, Thailand
(Pensoft Publishers) For the third consecutive time, a special issue in the open access zoological journal ZooKeys is hosting a collection of the research findings presented at the International Congress of Myriapodology. The contemporary myriapod research presented at the 17th International Congress of Myriapodology, held in July 2017 in Krabi, Thailand, contains 13 novel research papers by 35 authors from across the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UGR scientist developed 3-D scans of beetles for Blade Runner 2049
(University of Granada) One of the main visual effects companies behind Blade Runner 2049, BUF, sought the collaboration of Javier Alba-Tercedor, a Professor of Zoology at the University of Granada, to obtain scans of different species of beetles used in the film's visual effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zoo Tinder – how technology is helping animals hook up
The Zoological Information Management System takes the guesswork out of animal attraction and helps promote genetic varietyName: Zoological Information Management System.Age: Eight.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Zoos Apps World news Zoology Biology Science Tinder Technology Source Type: news

The terrifying phenomenon that is pushing species towards extinction
Scientists are alarmed by a rise in mass mortality events – when species die in their thousands. Is it all down to climate change?There was almost something biblical about the scene of devastation that lay before Richard Kock as he stood in the wilderness of the Kazakhstan steppe. Dotted across the grassy plain, as far as the eye could see, were the corpses of thousands upon thousands of saiga antelopes. All appeared to have fallen where they were feeding.Some were mothers that had travelled to this remote wilderness for the annual calving season, while others were their offspring, just a few days old. Each had ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Derbyshire Tags: Climate change Animals Science Kazakhstan Biology Zoology Conservation Environment World news Source Type: news

FDA Investigates Pattern of Contamination in Certain Raw Pet Foods Made by Arrow Reliance Inc., Including Darwin ’ s Natural Pet Products and ZooLogics Pet Food
The FDA is alerting pet owners to a history of four recalls of and multiple complaints associated with Darwin ’ s Natural and ZooLogics pet foods, manufactured by Arrow Reliance Inc., dba Darwin ’ s Natural Pet Products, over the period from October 17, 2016 to February 10, 2018. In each instance, the company recalled these products after being alerted to positive findings of Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes in samples of their raw pet food products. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 13, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news