Easing stress and seeking normalcy in traumatic times
For most Americans, 2020 has already been a rough year — and it’s not even half over. A pandemic, natural disasters, economic decline, and, for many, the loss of a job have taken a toll on their mental health. “Stress is particularly acute when you’re experiencing a situation that is outside of your control,” says Dr. Kerry Ressler, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “You may feel stuck, frozen, or helpless.” After a traumatic period, even when things settle down, it can be difficult to move on and regain a sense of normalcy. Reducing stress and regaining your footi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Anxiety and Depression Coronavirus and COVID-19 Mental Health Stress Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Hiding Panic Attacks in the Bathroom
  At the thought of losing a job or missing a mortgage payment, Gabe is an anxious discombobulated mess, while Lisa is cool as a cucumber. In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa ponder: Why do people have such vastly different ways of reacting to the world? They also discuss — with the special flare that only a divorced couple has — the good old days when Gabe would have full-blown panic attacks and Lisa had to get them through it. How did they handle these scary moments? Is it ever OK to feel anger toward the panicky person? And what if the panicky person accidentally causes harm — sh...
Source: World of Psychology - June 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Anxiety and Panic General LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

Podcast and Event Summary: New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar: Medically Assisted Dying in Canada: from where we ’ve come; to where we’re heading, presented by Professor Arthur Schafer (Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics, University of Manitoba)
Written by: Dr Amna Whiston In this seminar (available on podcast), Professor Arthur Schafer discussed the ethical challenges involved in the Canadian euthanasia debate at the New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar (online). Professor Schafer, who has written extensively over the last thirty years about a range of topics that includes professional and bio-medical ethics, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Amna Whiston's Posts Audio Files Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Event Summary syndicated Source Type: blogs

8 Ways to Authentically Connect with Your Kids
What are you teaching your kids? Being at home with your children under one roof can be challenging, but amidst a pandemic with the added strain can be really stressful! How can you use this time to connect more authentically at home with your children in quarantine? Here are 8 ways to slow down and connect with your kids at home. 1. Slow Down. You’re probably feeling frustrated with reactionary emotions to a difficult situation. Slowing down and getting real with your emotions shows your kids how to be resilient. The first step is making a distinction between worry and concern. Sharing your authentic emotions from ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Children and Teens Family Parenting Publishers YourTango coronavirus COVID-19 kids Parents trust Source Type: blogs

Five Things You May Not Realize Can Affect Your Mental Health
Did you know diabetes affects your mental health? From depression to relationship problems or mood swings, too much or too little glucose (sugar) circulating in the blood can trigger behavior and thought patterns that may seem unrelated to how much insulin is released by your pancreas. Out of control glucose levels influence how you feel and make decisions, your beliefs and, yes, your attitude, a very necessary component of your overall care.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states less than half the number of people with diabetes who have depression get treated, which leads to worsening stat...
Source: World of Psychology - May 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Comorbidities Diabetes Drug Interactions Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Was Covid-19 lockdown the right thing to do?
What do Sciencebase readers make of the view that there will far more long-term excess deaths and misery caused by the global lockdowns than there would have been had we let this coronavirus run free? This question is about estimating the serious long-term effects rather than giving those covidiots who fancy a trip to the beach or Barnard Castle an excuse to run wild and party. It is being discussed widely by many lockdown skeptics, including very well-respected scientists such as Mark Changizi. Obviously allowing the virus to run free would have meant overwhelming our healthcare services and there’d have been many m...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Podcast: A National Non-Profit is Born From a Random Encounter
In today’s Psych Central Podcast, Gabe talks with Jamie Tworkowski, the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms, a non-profit movement dedicated to helping people who are struggling with addiction, depression, self-injury and suicide. Jamie shares how the idea for the non-profit was born in 2006 after he spent 5 days with his new friend Renee who’d recently been turned down for rehab. After writing about the experience and posting it on Myspace, people began to respond with their own stories, and the seeds for the non-profit were planted. Tune in to find out how To Write Love on Her Arms helps people struggling w...
Source: World of Psychology - May 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Addiction Depression General Interview Podcast Policy and Advocacy Recovery Substance Abuse The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Misaligned Relationships, Rejection, Guilt, and Betrayal
One of my readers recently asked: How do you stay connected to loved ones who aren’t on a journey of curiosity and growth? I’ll frame this more generally by addressing these question too: How do you maintain relationships with incompatible people who expect you to stay connected?How do you manage shifting relationships while on a journey of growth?How do you deal with feelings of guilt arising from letting go of incompatible people? To answer the first question, my answer is pretty simple. I really don’t. If they reach out to me, I’ll be civil with them, but I don’t see the point o...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - May 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

How to Practice High-Quality Telemedicine in the Era of COVID-19
By ANISH MEHTA, MD My practice received its first question about coronavirus from a patient on January 28, 2020. Though there were over 200 deaths reported in China by that time, no one could have imagined how drastically this would come to disrupt our lives at home. Thankfully, I had a head start. As a doctor at an integrated telemedicine and primary care practice in New York City, nearly two out of every three of my medical encounters that month was already virtual. I spent much of January caring for patients who had contracted seasonal viruses, like influenza or norovirus (i.e. the stomach flu). My patients ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Give Yourself a Fighting Chance. Put Stable People in Your Support Network
If you struggle with suicide, depression or anxiety, the types of people you have in your support network can make the difference between them being a lifeline or a weight.It ’s been over two years since I was last suicidal. I wasn’t making dark and deadly plans at the time. I simply thought I would be better off dead. It was the matter-of-factness of the “epiphany” that startled me the most. It seemed perfectly logical. Fortunately, I’ve heard thislogic before and immediately engaged my coping strategies. I let family members know, I prayed deeply, and since I didn ’t have a current cou...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Depression Goodreads Suicide Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Parenting and Bipolar Disorder
  Should people with mental illness have children? In today’s Not Crazy Podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss their own reasons for not having kids, while also giving a platform to Amy Barnabi, a mother of two with bipolar disorder. Amy discusses her decision to have children and shares her experiences, joys and challenges thus far. What if you can’t be a good parent when your illness flares up? What if the child inherits your diagnosis? If you are a parent with mental illness, you’ve likely heard these questions. Tune in to hear these topics discussed (and much more!) on today’s podcast. (Transcript...
Source: World of Psychology - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Bipolar Children and Teens Disorders Family General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

The Second Wave: Coronavirus & Mental Health
The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - May 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Using Nature and Animals to Manage Anxiety
 When was the last time you simply enjoyed being in nature? Whether it’s a camping trip to the mountains, a walk in the park or just watching the squirrels from your backyard, being in nature is profoundly healing. In today’s Psych Central Podcast, our guest Richard Louv, a journalist, author and co-founder of the nonprofit Children & Nature Network, discusses the science behind nature’s healing powers. What counts as “nature?” Are pets included? What are some modern barriers to accessing nature, and how can we overcome them? Join us for the answers to these questions and more. SUBSCRI...
Source: World of Psychology - May 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Green and Environment Interview LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Some healthcare can safely wait (and some can ’t)
Among the many remarkable things that have happened since the COVID-19 pandemic began is that a lot of our usual medical care has simply stopped. According to a recent study, routine testing for cervical cancer, cholesterol, and blood sugar is down nearly 70% across the country. Elective surgeries, routine physical examinations, and other screening tests have been canceled or rescheduled so that people can stay at home, avoid being around others who might be sick, and avoid unknowingly spreading the virus. Many clinics, hospitals, and doctors’ offices have been closed for weeks except for emergencies. Even if these f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Health care Healthy Aging Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: The Role Nurses Play in Schizophrenia Treatment
Some of the professionals that work most with helping people with schizophrenia are nurses. There are so many types with different skill sets. Host Rachel Star Withers and Co-host Gabe Howards learn who these often overlooked healthcare workers are. Dr. Tari Dilks, Professor and President of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, joins with insight on what goes into being a psychiatric nurse.  Highlights in “The Role Nurses Play in Schizophrenia Treatment” Episode [01:14] Doctor sidekicks? [04:00] The types of nurses [06:40] Nurse Practitioners [11:00] Nurses specialties [13:00] Psychiatric Nursin...
Source: World of Psychology - May 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Mental Disorder Mental Illness Nurses Nursing Psychiatric Nurse Psychotherapy Treatment For Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Adverse effects of hydroxychloroquine
In case you were ever stupid enough to follow Trump’s lead you would have already injected ultraviolets in your eyeballs by now to save you from Covid and maybe bathed in Domestos or sulfuric acid or both! Anyway, his latest bullshine claim is that he’s been taking the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine to keep Covid at bay. Well, for starters there is no evidence that this drug acts as a prophylactic against infection with SARS CoV-2 or indeed any pathogen other than the causative agent of otherwise drug-resistant malaria. It’s primary use is in treating lupus. There was some testing done weeks ago to...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Health and Medicine Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Deconstructing Mental Health Month
  It’s Mental Health Awareness Month! But what does that mean, exactly? Who are we raising awareness for? Is “mental health” the same as “mental illness?” In this Not Crazy Podcast, Gabe and Lisa ponder the meaning of this decades-old campaign and discuss the pros and cons of the movement. What do you think? Is Mental Health Awareness Month a necessary outreach that sheds light on mental health, or is it a flimsy substitute for actual help? Tune in for an in-depth discussion that entails several different perspectives. (Transcript Available Below) Subscribe to Our Show! And Please Reme...
Source: World of Psychology - May 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Policy and Advocacy Source Type: blogs

And now for some good news on health
When it comes to health concerns, the COVID-19 pandemic is top of mind for most people right now. And that’s for good reason. But there is some very good non-COVID health news that may not be getting the attention it deserves. According to the CDC, the rates of six of the top 10 causes of death in this country, which account for about three-quarters of all deaths, have been declining. That’s remarkable. And these improvements are occurring despite an aging population and an obesity epidemic that affects several health conditions. Six positive health trends Let’s look at the trends in these conditions...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cancer Health Health trends Heart Health Source Type: blogs

It ’s Not About Tradeoffs
By MICHEL ACCAD It is tempting to oppose the harmful effects of COVID-related lockdown orders with arguments couched in terms of trade-offs.  We may contend that when public authorities promote the benefits of “flattening the curve,” they fail to properly take into account the actual costs of imposing business closures and of forced social distancing: The coming economic depression will lead to mass unemployment, rising poverty, suicides, domestic abuse, alcoholism, and myriad other potential causes of death and suffering which could be considerably worse than the harms of the pandemic itself, es...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Economics MICHEL ACCAD Source Type: blogs

The Coronavirus Outbreak is Overwhelming to People ’ s Mental Health
With the novel coronavirus outbreak of 2020 raging across the world with little end in sight, people’s mental health is starting to become seriously impacted. There’s no easy way to say this — people are struggling right now. Stay-at-home orders, while invaluable and helping from a public health perspective, are taking their toll on people’s emotional state. And if you were already vulnerable due to a mental illness diagnosis or concern you were grappling with, the outbreak of COVID-19 has only made things worse. The problem is that most public health experts are spending time talking about the phy...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 Depression Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Divorced Couple Hosting a Mental Health Podcast
  What if a divorced couple decided to make a podcast about mental health? What would it be like? Well, wonder no more, because here it is. Grab a cup of hot tea and tune in to the first episode of the totally revamped Not Crazy podcast with Gabe and Lisa, a couple of divorcees who didn’t like each other’s cats. What was their marriage like? Why talk about mental health? And what happened to the cats? Find out the answers to these questions and much more on today’s show. (Transcript Available Below) Subscribe to Our Show! And Please Remember to Review Us! About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe H...
Source: World of Psychology - May 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Marriage and Divorce Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

Want to Stem the Rising Mental Health Crisis? Look Beyond the Usual Suspects for Help
As the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic effects spread, concerns about mental health impacts continue to grow. For example, we worry for health and human services professionals whose duties involve higher risk for trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress. Reports of global increases in family violence also suggest that there will be many violence victims and witnesses in need of mental health support. Add to this the potential effects of social isolation, health-related anxiety, and that these mental health problems may persist and worsen long after society goes back to “normal.” And this is all happening as...
Source: World of Psychology - May 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lynsay Ayer, Ph.D. & Clare Stevens, M.P.H. Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Stress Suicide coronavirus COVID-19 Depression pandemic Task sharing Source Type: blogs

A Tribute to My Colleagues and All Those Working in Mental Health
During a time when the world is focused on the current COVID-19 pandemic, a physical health crisis, and all those treating the physical symptoms of this pandemic, we must not forget those who are working to treat the mental health of our nation: the mental health workers. The force of mental health workers includes nurses, counselors, social workers, physicians, and others. These individuals may not be intubating, but ask if they are implementing life-saving tactics and administering life-saving medication and the answer will be a resounding yes.  You may ask yourself what are these life-saving tactics and medications...
Source: World of Psychology - May 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kristin Pitman, Psy.D., LPC Tags: General Psychotherapy Suicide Treatment coronavirus COVID-19 Mental Health Care Providers Source Type: blogs

Understanding Maternal Depression
The role of motherhood is complex and profound. Psychology and development experts agree — the role of the mother is critical to child development, for better or worse. This role is also packed full of societal expectations and emotional milestones for an individual to navigate.  From the moment the pregnancy test confirms impending birth, an individual begins to conjure expectations they have of their own for this experience as well as what significant others, family members, friends, and society will hold for this new mother. While becoming a mother can be one of the most joyful and fulfilling passages of a wo...
Source: World of Psychology - May 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Depression Women's Issues Coping on Mother's Day Maternal Depression postpartum depression Source Type: blogs

The Unseen Trauma of COVID-19
The kind of trauma doctors, nurses, and others in direct contact with COVID-19 patients have endured for months now — with an uncertain future posing a threat of many more months of horror in the hardest-hit areas — is the kind of exhausting and overwhelming stress that impacts the brain and the rest of the body in the worst ways. Whether or not these individuals were mentally healthy before the pandemic, this work takes an often-invisible toll. Sometimes, in a life and death struggle, that toll becomes a pull toward suicide. Compassionate Fatigue, also called Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS), can happen when p...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Trauma Compassionate Fatigue coronavirus COVID-19 Healthcare Workers Secondary Traumatic Stress Source Type: blogs

The Problem With “Herd Immunity” as a COVID-19 Strategy
This article originally appeared on his blog here. The post The Problem With “Herd Immunity” as a COVID-19 Strategy appeared first on The Health Care Blog. (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Dave deBronkart e-Patient Dave e-Patient Dave DeBronkart Pandemic Source Type: blogs

The Unlikely Rise Of Science And Digital Health During COVID-19
Over the past weeks, we have covered many aspects of coronavirus. From symptoms and digital health technologies, artificial intelligence, the rise of telemedicine and investigating why some countries have managed to keep the pandemic under control, through issues of privacy and mental challenges of healthcare professionals. We analyzed the possible outcomes of what will, what can and what should change in our lives after COVID-19 and even created a Handbook on the fight against the pandemic. But one of the most important aspects in all this is how different leaders around the world have responded to this pandemic. Were ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 5, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Artificial Intelligence Digital Health Research Future of Medicine science covid19 leadership coron Thunberg Fauci Trump Topol Barabasi Brilliant Harari Queen Source Type: blogs

Washington v. Glucksberg: Has the Supreme Court Overruled its Decision on Medical Aid in Dying?
Has the U.S. Supreme Court overruled Washington v. Glucksberg, its 1997 decision on Medical Aid in Dying? Ronald Turner has the answer in the new issue of the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy. Turner explains, "In Washington v. Glucksberg, the Court held that an asserted right to physician-assisted suicide is not a fundamental liberty interest protected by the clause because it is not a right deeply rooted in this nation's history and tradition." "More recently, in Obergefell v. Hodges, the Court held that state laws prohibiting same-sex marriage violated the Due Process Clause. In so h...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

20 Mother ’ s Day Gifts for Moms Battling Depression
Do you have someone in your life that you know needs some extra encouragement this year?  Mother’s day is usually a day that most women are celebrated by their kids, family and friends. Unfortunately, some women don’t always receive the love and support that they really need. Some women are going through tough trials and situations, and they’re in need of more than just a “Happy Mother’s Day.” Take a deeper look at the faces of the women around you and in your life. You’ll begin to see that they are facing way more than you think. Some have been going through hard times for a ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jasmine L. Bennett Tags: Depression Parenting Women's Issues Coping on Mother's Day social distancing Source Type: blogs

What a Pandemic Does to Grief
Pandemic stress has a psychological component that affects people in many ways. That includes those who are grieving. Normally, after the death of a loved one, the world seems to stop for those left behind. Grief isolates and provides a period for processing loss. Grief after traumatic circumstances — devastating illness or injury; sudden death that leaves no time to say goodbye; murder; suicide; man-made or natural disasters that take many lives — adds complex layers. But what happens to those who are grieving during a pandemic, a traumatic horror in itself? With so many deaths around us from COVID-19 and the ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Grief and Loss Bereavement coronavirus COVID-19 grieving pandemic social distancing traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Be Yourself, Nurses; Everyone Else Is Taken
Owning and stepping into your own genius as a nurse is important; and genius is, of course, relative for all nurses. At times, we can lose heart and feel that we just can't become the person or professional we thought we could be; however, seeking our own individual path is paramount when it comes to creating a career that feels tailor-made just for us, and not just a path someone else said was the best one to follow. Whether you feel like an impostor or your career has grown stale, there's nothing you can be other than yourself; and if you're trying terribly hard to be just like someone else (or do what others tell y...
Source: Digital Doorway - May 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers nurse nurse career nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

The unspoken death toll of COVID-19: suicide
Today I woke up to the news that a fellow  physician died by suicide. As I read the article, I felt a sharp pain in my chest. My eyes watered. They still do, as I write this piece. Although I did not personally know Dr. Lorna M. Breen, an ER doctor in New York City, the loss […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/amalia-londono-tobon" rel="tag" > Amalia Londono Tobon, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Why you should support physician health plans
Some physicians have opined their belief that physician health plans (PHP) are contributing to the increasing physician suicidality. These beliefs have been used to attack PHPs and unfortunately, steer those in need to other resources or even have those in need not getting help. Blaming the PHP for suicide is like blaming the physician who […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/virginia-e-hall" rel="tag" > Virginia E. Hall, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Wait, Other People Don ’ t Think about Suicide?
The most startling thing I’ve heard in my life is that not everyone thinks about suicide every day. Or now and then. Or even once in a long while. Can that be? I heard this from a co-worker a while ago. We were collaborating on a dreary project, and I joked about it being the kind of work that makes you want to kill yourself and what a relief that would be. “I know, right?” I expected her to say. Instead, she chuckled uncomfortably, then asked if I really thought that way. When I said yes, she was taken aback and a little disbelieving. “You never have?” I asked. “Of course not!” I ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rich Pliskin Tags: Personal Suicide Depression Suicidal Thoughts Source Type: blogs

Will Medical Workers Deal With PTSD After COVID-19?
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is commonly linked with war veterans. This mental health condition however can be triggered by suffering or witnessing any terrifying event like accidents, natural disasters,  violent experience – or a disastrous pandemic. It comes as no surprise that medical health professionals and other people in the frontline of the fight against coronavirus are expected to have a surge in trauma-related illnesses, particularly PTSD. Beside protecting and helping personnel physically as well as mentally, there are also digital health solutions that can come to the rescue. A Canadian r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality digital health ptsd stress stress management medical professionals digital healthcare coronavirus covid covid19 Source Type: blogs

How can you support your teenager with autism spectrum disorder if they are depressed?
As every parent knows, teenage life is full of challenges, from stress over academics to social relationships and physical changes due to puberty. This stage of life can be particularly challenging for those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A recent study found that teenagers and young adults with ASD are nearly three times more likely to develop depression than same-age peers without ASD. What are typical symptoms of depression? While occasional sadness is a normal part of life, persistent sadness can be a sign of depression. Other common signs and symptoms of depression can be grouped into thinking patterns, changes ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris McDougle, MD Tags: Adolescent health Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Provide Emotional Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Physicians Facing Psychological Trauma From the COVID-19 Crisis
By SUZAN SONG MD, MPH, PhD The U.S. now has the highest number of COVID-related deaths in the world, with exhausted, frightened physicians managing the front lines. We need not only medical supplies but also emotional personal protective equipment (PPE) against the psychological burden of the pandemic. As a psychiatrist, my role in COVID-19 has included that of a therapist for my colleagues. I helped start Physician Support Line, a peer-to-peer hotline for physicians staffed by more than 500 volunteer psychiatrists. Through the hotline and social media, physicians are revealing their emotional fatigue. One doctor sh...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy coronavirus Mental Health Pandemic Psychology Source Type: blogs

Responsible Reporting Is Vital In Media Coverage Of Suicide
Exactly how the media discusses suicide is a topic of frequent debate. Plenty of research has linked media reporting  of suicide with an increase in suicidal behaviour, and both the Samaritans and the World Health Organization (WHO), amongst others, have clear (and frequently promoted) guides for journalists on how to report suicide. But such guidelines are often ignored in favour of insensitivity or sensationalism — especially when the person at hand is a celebrity. Take the recent coverage of the death of Caroline Flack: explicit, deeply intimate details were plastered across tabloids for weeks, with seemingly...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Media Mental health Suicide/ self-harm Source Type: blogs

Not a staycation: Isolating at home affects our mental health (and what to do)
As a pediatrician and a parent navigating this pandemic, I worry sometimes that an important point gets lost in the midst of all the helpful posts about things to do with your children in cramped spaces, homeschooling, and other tips for managing the current reality: This is bad for the mental health of each and every one of us. Let’s review: We were going about our business as usual and suddenly a possibly deadly virus appeared and shut down life as we knew it. School and daycare closed, and our children were home without any structure or activity except what we create or enforce. Every trip out of the house became ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Inpatient Psychiatric Stays From a Doctor ’ s Perspective
We’ve all heard scary inpatient stories from the psychiatric hospital. Perhaps you have a personal experience that you’d rather forget. In today’s podcast, Gabe asks a psychologist with 25 years of hospital experience the tough questions surrounding psych wards: Why do so many psychiatric inpatients seem to have such unpleasant — or even traumatizing — experiences while there? Are these stories the norm or the exception? For those who have had bad experiences, how can we change things?  Tune in to hear the unique perspective of Dr. David Susman, a licensed clinical psychologist who offer...
Source: World of Psychology - April 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Podcast Psychiatry The Psych Central Show Treatment Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Quarantine and Declining Mental Health
  Day 1,364 of the COVID-19 quarantine (well, at least it feels like it). How are you holding up? If you’re like most people, you’re not having much fun. But if you already struggle with anxiety, depression or another mental health issue, these days of isolation and uncertainty can feel like absolute torture. In today’s Not Crazy episode, Gabe laments the loss of his routine — those regular activities he clung to religiously to keep his mental health in check.  Now what is he supposed to do? Tune in for a special quarantine episode. Together, we will grieve our old routines and discuss...
Source: World of Psychology - April 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Self-Help Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and the toll on health care workers ’ mental health
It is well known that physicians are more likely to screen positive for depression and have higher rates of suicide than their counterparts in the general population. But how is this fact exacerbated by the global pandemic of fear, anxiety, and mounting death tolls known as COVID-19? For starters, health care workers are at the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 1, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/amira-athanasios" rel="tag" > Amira Athanasios < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Lonnie and Carrie ’ s Wheat Belly journey
“ Living the Wheat Belly and Undoctored lifestyle will not rid our lives of all adversity. But it can make you stronger, more optimistic, and resilient. Here is Lonnie and Carrie’s story: “One year ago today, my life changed in unthinkable ways. I discovered the Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox book and read it during my kids’ spring break. I had dabbled in the ‘paleo’ diet world a bit over the last five years with inconsistent success and had some idea about how good I felt when eliminating grains… “But the protocols in this book seemed to go further then just diet, like addr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 31, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open Depression grain-free Inflammation undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Bipolar & Substance Abuse Disorders: A Complex Diagnosis that Demands Integrated Medical & Psychological Care
The word “bipolar” has become colloquially associated with anything that changes rapidly or is unpredictable: the weather, technology, sports teams, politics, or even a teenager’s attitude. But for roughly 46 million people worldwide, being “bipolar” is far more serious than typical unpredictability, mood swings, or temperamental behavior. And, when bipolar disorder is complicated by substance use disorder (SUD), the situation can become incredibly dangerous for the individual and those around them. Recognizing the symptoms of bipolar and the complicating factors of substance use disorder is c...
Source: World of Psychology - March 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marlon Rollins Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Bipolar Disorder Detox Dual Diagnosis World Bipolar Day Source Type: blogs

There Is No Playbook for a Pandemic
Twilight Zone time, not sure how long the unofficial quarantine has been going on in my neck of the woods, nor do I know how long it will last. As of a day or so ago, Tom Wolf, governor of my home state of Pennsylvania, declared that everyone is expected to remain at home, unless they need to go to the supermarket, pharmacy, medical appointment or essential workplace. As a psychotherapist, I am in that category. Our group practice office which provides counseling and medication management will remain active with the condition that we use telehealth to serve our clients. A short learning curve, far easier than I anticipate...
Source: World of Psychology - March 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: General Personal coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic quarantine Source Type: blogs

Four Tips to Build a Support Network While Sheltering in Place
If you’re feeling down from too much social distancing, how do you build a support network when you’re sheltering in place ‽Support networks are the sort of things you’re supposed to have already put into place for that time when you need them. You’re also supposed to file your taxes on time, separate your recyclables, and brush your teeth twice a day. There are a lot of things we’resupposed to do, but for one reason or another, we sometimes don’t get around to doing. Support networks take effort to build. Because of that, it is easy to avoid putting yourself out there when things are ...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - March 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Depression Family Goodreads Suicide Source Type: blogs

Why is uncertainty so stressful?
Stress caused by uncertainty can be paralyzing. The information we are getting about the coronavirus seems to be changing by the hour — creating unprecedented uncertainty. There is a good reason your nerves are jangle, or you are feeling unsettled or anxious. Uncertainty is perceived as unsafe and potentially painful. Whether the situation is predictably positive or predictably negative, your brain prefers something familiar to something unfamiliar. Under stress, our brains depend on instinct rather than rational thought because the part of the brain responsible for critical thinking is busy dealing with the psycholo...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - March 25, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Eliz Greene Tags: Stress Management uncertainty Source Type: blogs

Signs and Symptoms that Could Stop Suicide
Learning about suicide is important. Most individuals who end their lives (over 40,000 each year in the United States alone) struggle with mental health disorders. Knowing the signs and symptoms do not always prevent suicides but could help you protect yourself, your family and your friends. Reach out to health professionals if you are worried, and keep in mind you can also research reputable organizations online. The one thing you don’t want to do is stay uninformed about something that could mean the difference between life and death. Warning signs that may indicate a mental health disorder could be mistaken for th...
Source: World of Psychology - March 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Stigma Suicide Depression grieving Source Type: blogs

The aftermath of a suicide attempt
In November each year, I usually attend an all-day conference in Louisville on the subject of depression. Some of it can become a little grim, but there is an especially tasty free box-lunch that I appreciate. Suicide is a big subject at depression conferences. One might expect this to be true. The focus is on […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 25, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/raymond-abbott" rel="tag" > Raymond Abbott < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs