Are antibiotics needed for your child with an ear infection?
The common practice in this country (although not everywhere— Europe, for example) has long been to treat all acute middle ear infections (otitis media) with antibiotics. This is not necessarily needed. We now know that for many children another reasonable approach is to wait a day or so to see if the symptoms get […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christopher-johnson" rel="tag" > Christopher Johnson, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Meet Debara Tucci, Incoming Director of NIDCD
The recently appointed director of NIDCD brings an extensive research background in hearing loss, ear disease, and cochlear implantation—and an enthusiasm for addressing barriers to hearing health care. Interview by Jillian Kornak The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently named Debara L. Tucci the next director of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), replacing acting director Judith Cooper. Tucci will leave her position as professor of surgery in the Division of Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences at Duke University Medical Center, where she has served on...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - May 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Jillian Kornak Tags: Academia & Research Audiology Health Care News Private Practice Schools Slider Aging and Hearing Loss audiologist hearing health care public health Source Type: blogs

Pediatric Conjunctivitis a Simple Diagnosis Until It Isn’t
​Conjunctivitis is a common condition and easy enough to treat, but several uncommon conjunctivitis syndromes require more care and should not be missed.Conjunctivitis is either infectious (viral or bacterial) or noninfectious (allergic or nonallergic). Viral infections are more common in adults, bacterial ones in children, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Adults tend to have more S. aureus infections, while the other pathogens are more common in children. An adenovirus is typically responsible for viral-associated infections in conjunct...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - March 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Not just bad health IT, but SPECTACULARLY bad health IT
I define bad healthcare IT as:... IT that is ill-suited to purpose, hard to use, unreliable, loses data or provides incorrect data, is difficult and/or prohibitively expensive to customize to the needs of different medical specialists and subspecialists, causes cognitive overload, slows rather than facilitates users, lacks appropriate alerts, creates the need for hypervigilance (i.e., towards avoiding IT-related mishaps) that increases stress, is lacking in security, lacks evidentiary soundness, compromises patient privacy or otherwise demonstrates suboptimal design and/or implementation. (http://cci.drexel.edu/faculty/ssi...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 20, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: bad health IT healthcare IT amateur KevinMD Niran S. Al-Agba Source Type: blogs

Primary Diagnosis: None
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD My pediatric practice is one which harkens back to days long ago when physicians knew their patients and pertinent medical histories by heart. My 81-year-old father and I were in practice together for the past 16 years; he still used the very sophisticated “hunt and peck” to compose emails. The task of transitioning to an electronic record system seemed insurmountable, so we remain on paper. Our medical record system has not changed in almost five decades. I would not have it any other way. This past spring, he walked into my office shaking his head in disbelief after thumbing through a sta...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Is Marital Status in a Febrile 5-year-old Child Important?
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD My pediatric practice is one which harkens back to days long ago when physicians knew their patients and pertinent medical histories by heart. My 81-year-old father and I were in practice together for the past 16 years; he still used the very sophisticated “hunt and peck” to compose emails. The task of transitioning to an electronic record system seemed insurmountable, so we remain on paper. Our medical record system has not changed in almost five decades. I would not have it any other way. This past spring, he walked into my office shaking his head in disbelief after thumbing through a sta...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

CMS Releases Final Rule for Second Year of QPP
Last week, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a final rule that makes changes in the second year of the Quality Payment Program (QPP) under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), including the Merit-based Incentive Program (MIPS) and Advanced Payment Models (APMs). The second year of the QPP continues to build on transitional year 1 policies, noting that a “second year to ramp-up the program will continue to help build upon the iterative learning and development of year 1 in preparation for a robust program in year 3.” In addition to the final rule, ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 6, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

CMS Releases Final Rule for Second Year of QPP - Includes PI-QI CME Improvement Activity
Last week, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a final rule that makes changes in the second year of the Quality Payment Program (QPP) under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), including the Merit-based Incentive Program (MIPS) and Advanced Payment Models (APMs). The second year of the QPP continues to build on transitional year 1 policies, noting that a “second year to ramp-up the program will continue to help build upon the iterative learning and development of year 1 in preparation for a robust program in year 3.” In addition to the final rule, ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 6, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

The challenge of “ evidence based ” sore throat guidelines
In 2007, Matthys and colleagues published a classic article: Differences Among International Pharyngitis Guidelines: Not Just Academic Jan Matthys, Marc De Meyere, Mieke L. van Driel, An De Sutter Ann Fam Med. 2007 Sep; 5(5): 436–443. doi: 10.1370/afm.741 PMCID: PMC2000301 RESULTS We included 4 North American and 6 European guidelines. Recommendations differ with regard to the use of a rapid antigen test and throat culture and with the indication for antibiotics. The North American, French, and Finnish guidelines consider diagnosis of group A streptococcus essential, and prevention o...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 23, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205. Question 1 Meigs’ Syndrome resolves after removal of the tumour. What is the classic triad of Meigs’ Syndrome? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet771338363'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetli...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis Argyll Robertson aspergilloma aspergillus Calabar extrinsic allergic alveolitis invasive aspergillosis kartagener's syndrome liver Loa loa worms Meigs syndrome ocular oa Source Type: blogs

Is the “full course of antibiotics” full of baloney?
Follow me on Twitter @JohnRossMD Antibiotic resistance is an emerging threat to public health. If the arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles, treating infection becomes more difficult. Conventional wisdom has long held that stopping a course of antibiotics early may be a major cause of antibiotic resistance. But is this really supported by the evidence? According to a new study in the BMJ, the answer is no. The notion that a longer course of antibiotics prevents resistance started early in the antibiotic era, when doctors found that patients with staphylococcal blood infections and tuberculosis relapsed after short anti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Outbreaks of Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Infection in the United States
To date, 114 known outbreaks of human infection by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been associated with medical / other invasive procedures.  37 of these (32%) have reported from the United States.  The following chronology is abstracted from the Gideon e-book series. [1]   Primary references are available from the author.  1987     17 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae otitis media in Louisiana caused by contaminated water used by an ENT practice  1988    8 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection associated with a contaminated jet injector used in a Podiatry of...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Watching for Signs of Ear Infections in Young Clients
Approximately two-thirds of children get at least one middle-ear infection (otitis media) by age 3, and one-third of these children will experience at least three episodes. The earlier a child gets their first ear infection, the more susceptible they are to recurrent episodes. Children with recurrent ear infections accompanied by middle-ear fluid (otitis media with effusion) often experience fluctuating mild to moderate hearing loss. This type of hearing loss can be difficult to detect, yet can have a major effect on language and speech-sound acquisition. Speech-language pathologists can play an important role in tracking ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 8, 2017 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Jody Vaynshtok Tags: Audiology Speech-Language Pathology ear infection Early Intervention hearing loss hearing protection Language Disorders Speech Disorders Source Type: blogs

Oldie but Goodie Pediatric Clinical Concepts
​A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago. Physicians should feel free to question the potential value and validity of older clinical concepts that aren't at the forefront of medical education, but my experience of more than 30 years practicing pediatrics and emergency medicine has repeatedly affirmed to me that these are valuable in emergency medicine.​Parenteral DiarrheaThe concept of parenteral diarrhea has been around for...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - March 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Oldie but Goodie Pediatric Clinical Concepts
​A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago. Physicians should feel free to question the potential value and validity of older clinical concepts that aren't at the forefront of medical education, but my experience of more than 30 years practicing pediatrics and emergency medicine has repeatedly affirmed to me that these are valuable in emergency medicine.​Parenteral DiarrheaThe concept of parenteral diarrhea has been around for...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - March 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 264
Welcome to the 264th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Another great set of talks from SMACCDub released this week: John Greenwood discussing assault on the RV and Haney Mallemat on the PEA Paradox. [AS]   The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Rob Orman talks to a number of EPs about the prac...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 263
Welcome to the 263rd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week A well-written NY Times essay on how social isolation is killing us made the Internet rounds over the holidays, penned by a medical resident.   The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine A very interesting and thought provoking post by Josh Fa...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

National Healthy People Initiative Includes Updated Section on Hearing and Other Sensory or Communication Disorders
  Editor’s Note: This is the first of a two-part posting on Healthy People 2020. The second, which you can read this Thursday, covers how you can get more involved with Healthy People hearing initiatives in your state. Improving the health of all Americans is the goal of a nationwide project, Healthy People. Launched in 1979 by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPH) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People sets and monitors national health objectives to meet a wide range of health issues, encourage research and guide the public in making the best health ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 14, 2016 Category: Speech Therapy Authors: Pam Mason Tags: Audiology Health Care Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss hearing protection Source Type: blogs

How Does Vaccinated Children’s Health Compare to Unvaccinated Children?
Conclusion While government groups maintain that no studies have been done to compare the health of vaccinated to unvaccinated, the reality is that several comparative studies have been completed by independent researchers in the US and in other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention refuses to conduct such studies, claiming they would be unethical to perform. In reality, these studies could easily be performed, since many educated parents choose to not vaccinate their children. The evidence is overwhelming. Studies completed in New Zealand, Germany, Africa, Great Britain and the United States have come ...
Source: vactruth.com - June 3, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Picks Top Stories truth about vaccines vaccinated vs. unvaccinated Source Type: blogs

How Does Vaccinated Children ’s Health Compare to Unvaccinated Children?
Conclusion While government groups maintain that no studies have been done to compare the health of vaccinated to unvaccinated, the reality is that several comparative studies have been completed by independent researchers in the US and in other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention refuses to conduct such studies, claiming they would be unethical to perform. In reality, these studies could easily be performed, since many educated parents choose to not vaccinate their children. The evidence is overwhelming. Studies completed in New Zealand, Germany, Africa, Great Britain and the United States have come ...
Source: vactruth.com - June 3, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Picks Top Stories truth about vaccines vaccinated vs. unvaccinated Source Type: blogs

Tamiflu For All? Evidence Of Morbidity In CDC’s Antiviral Guidelines
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has boiled down its public health campaign against influenza to a single slogan: “Take 3.” Vaccines, everyday preventive actions like handwashing, and influenza antivirals. Last year, because of a mismatch between the vaccine and circulating virus, the message was reduced to—essentially—“Take 1,” as the CDC emphatically promoted oseltamivir (Tamiflu) for treating disease. The agency has stated: “Antiviral flu medicines are underutilized. If you get them early, they could keep you out of the hospital and might even save your ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 31, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Peter Doshi, Kenneth Mandl and Florence Bourgeois Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Global Health Health Professionals Public Health Quality CDC clinical trials drug safety FDA influenza Physicians Prevention Research vaccines Source Type: blogs

Are follow-up visits necessary?
I've spent two afternoons precepting with the residents recently.  It's good to get back into clinical work – and after spending 3 years in Washington – separated by the Beltway from the real world – I've really felt the need to get back to the front lines of health care delivery to make sure I still understand the real world.  I'm also seeing a window into how these physicians have been trained, and that is different from my life as a family physician in a small suburban practice – which was my reality pre – DC. I've witnessed two themes that seem to de...
Source: Docnotes - February 7, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jacobr Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A Year in Review: FDA 2015 New Drug Approvals
The approval of first-of-a-kind drugs rose last year to forty-one, resulting in the highest level of newly approved U.S. drugs in nineteen years. The total number of new drugs approved last year was even higher at sixty-nine. The rising figures reflect an industry-wide desire to research and develop drugs for rare and hard-to-treat diseases. The newly approved drugs serve to advance medical care and the health of patients suffering from many ailments, including various forms of cancer, heart failure, and cystic fibrosis. Additionally, more than 40% of the new therapies were approved for treatment of rare or "orphan&...
Source: Policy and Medicine - January 13, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

MeSH on Demand
Does MeSH on Demand have possibilities for identifying thesaurus terms for use in a search, as I wondered if in a previous post?MeSH on Demand is here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/MeSHonDemand.html.  There is information about it in this NLM Technical Bulletin article.  As a first test, I entered this text:The use of antibiotics to treat otitis media in children under 5. MeSH on Demand suggests: Anti-Bacterial AgentsAntibiotics, Antitubercular ChildDermatologic AgentsHumansOtitis MediaThere is a disclaimer that says that humans might have come up with different terms, and that MeSH on Demand might sugge...
Source: Browsing - August 4, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: literature searching medline pubmed Source Type: blogs

Identifying search terms
For any literature search, you will need to identify your search terms.  What words or phrases are you going to search for?   What thesaurus terms are you going to choose? If you are doing a detailed search for evidence for a systematic review, or doing a systematic search for some other reason, identification of search terms will include identification of synonyms, that is, alternative terms for the concept you are interested in.Here are some possible ways to identify thesaurus and free text terms, and synonyms.  Scoping searchUse a PICO grid or similar to identify the search concepts, and search for those....
Source: Browsing - August 4, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: literature searching systematic reviews Source Type: blogs

What’s the harm? A child dies a preventable death from an ear infection
A common question, rhetorical or otherwise, that skeptics are asked about alternative medicine is, “What’s the harm?” It’s seemingly an effective ploy for some modalities, so much so that years ago Tim Farley felt obligated to try to answer the question on a website (whatstheharm.net) that catalogues examples of the harm alternative medicine, supernatural and… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - June 16, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Antivaccine nonsense Complementary and alternative medicine Homeopathy Quackery Religion antibiotics Bradford County child neglect Christine Delozier ear infection Ebed Delozier Hope Delozier medical neglect otitis media Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review #170
Welcome to the 170th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the WeekRory Spiegel offers an in-depth look at the endovascular study triad recently released (MR CLEAN, EXTEND-IA and ESCAPE) to treat acute ischemic strokes, and why we should be cautiously optimistic that a small subset of patients have been identified i...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 170
Welcome to the 170th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the WeekRory Spiegel offers an in-depth look at the endovascular study triad recently released (MR CLEAN, EXTEND-IA and ESCAPE) to treat acute ischemic strokes, and why we should be cautiously optimistic that a small subset of patients have been identified i...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 070
This study demonstrated a high sensitivity (86%) and very high specificity (97%) when looking for consolidations> 1 cm on US compared to chest X-ray as the standard. The study was done quickly (mean 7 minutes) and by non-experts (1 hour of training) increasing the likelihood that the findings can be generalized to non-study settings.Recommended by: Anand SwaminathanThe Best of the RestResuscitationOlaussen A, et al. Return of consciousness during ongoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A systematic review, Resuscitation 2014; 86: 44-48. PMID 25447435After introduction of mechanical CPR device CPR induced c...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 11, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Neurosurgery Pediatrics Resuscitation Trauma critical care examination Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Outbreaks of Non-tubercuous Mycobacterial Infection in the United States
The following chronology of nosocomial mycobacteriosis outbreaks in the United States is abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Primary references available on request. 1987 – An outbreak (17 cases) of Mycobacterium chelonae otitis media was caused by contaminated water used by an ENT practice in Louisiana. 1988 – An outbreak (8 cases) of foot infections due to Mycobacterium chelonae subspecies abscessus infections were associated with a jet injector used in a podiatric office. 1989 to 1990 – An outbreak (16 cases) of sputum colonization by Mycobacterium fortuitum ...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 23, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Microbiology Outbreaks ProMED Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 129
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 129th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM,...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 11, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care Pediatrics Toxicology #FOAMped #FOAMtox #meded FOAMcc FOAMed LITFL R/V LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Twitter and the dissemination of research evidence
Trip aggregates some wonderful content.  The main route for people finding this evidence is via search or by registering with Trip and indicating what topic areas they're interested (in which case we email the user with the latest research that matches their interests).Towards Christmas I started to experiment with using Twitter as a dissemination route.  Basically, I created two topic areas (Primary care and Cancer) and starting tweeting simply the title of the article and the URL of relevant articles that were recently added to Trip.  The Trip techie (Phil) suggested I use some tracking to see if people ar...
Source: Liberating the literature - January 17, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Ear Tubes May Not Have Long-Term Benefits for Kids With Ear Infections
Ear tubes can improve hearing over the short term in children with a certain type of ear infection but they don’t help children’s hearing, speech or language over the long term. This is according to a new review published by Dr. Michael Steiner and colleagues at the University of North Carolina.  They reviewed the findings of 41 studies that assessed the effects of implanting ear tubes in children with what doctors call recurrent or chronic otitis media with effusion. In this condition, there is fluid in the middle ear, but no signs or symptoms of acute ear infection.  To read the complete news releas...
Source: BHIC - January 15, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Michelle Burda Tags: Children and Teens Source Type: blogs

Dogs And Cows And Toxic Vials, That’s What Vaccines Are Made Of!
Conclusion It is apparent that our vaccinations include some very strange and unsavoury ingredients. The three single vaccines were certainly not the only vaccines I came across containing parts of animals, humans and insects. In fact, I found a huge list of them on a PDF which I have included as extra research. For some reason, many parents are perfectly happy to have their tiny babies vaccinated with everything from insect cells to pigs’ gelatin, without a moment’s hesitation, arguing that the vaccines are to protect their children and keep them strong and healthy. Others remain totally unaware of the vaccine...
Source: vactruth.com - December 18, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories Adverse Events adverse reactions Measles Vaccine Medi-Mumps MMR mumps vaccine Pavivac rubella vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs

Evidence Based Medical Decision Making Notes and Templates
by miamidoc13 (Posted Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:48 pm)Examples:Pediatric Head Trauma@AGE@ @SEX@ presenting with head trauma. Patient's neurological exam was non-focal and unremarkable. Canadian Head CT Rule was applied and patient did not have any of the following; GCS score
Source: Med Student Guide - December 5, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Evidence Based Medical Decision Making Notes and Templates
by miamidoc13 (Posted Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:47 pm)Examples:Pediatric Head Trauma@AGE@ @SEX@ presenting with head trauma. Patient's neurological exam was non-focal and unremarkable. Canadian Head CT Rule was applied and patient did not have any of the following; GCS score
Source: Med Student Guide - December 5, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Changing the culture of American Medicine — Start by removing hubris
This may be the most important post I have ever published. I’m going to tell you about a study that should change the entire way doctors approach patients, and how patients should think of prescribed treatments. These findings should begin a culture change in American medicine. Background: I used to think Medicine would get easier over time. It makes sense, right? You see patterns, you learn how treatments work, and you just get to know stuff. Experience should make it easier to diagnose and treat. That’s not been the case for me. In fact, it’s closer to the opposite. In the exam room, as I look up to the...
Source: Dr John M - July 28, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

The AUC and Me
Over the last several years, there has been a plethora of discussion swirling around the appropriate use criteria (AUC); some of it reasoned but most, simply vitriolic. I have led projects attempting to use the AUC to extract data from electronic health records for quality improvement purposes, been witness to efforts to use the AUC in place of radiology benefits managers, and participated in numerous conversations related to the terms used to describe the categories and even the techniques employed to organize the classification for each scenario discussed.  I have learned a tremendous amount… but mostly I&...
Source: ACC in Touch Blog - May 9, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Administrator Tags: Health Policy and Practice Management Clinical Topics Source Type: blogs

Disruptor Profile: Jayne Mackta
I can’t remember how or when I met Jayne Mackta, but I’ve always been grateful I did and I hope you’ll agree when I introduce her to you today. Jayne is an entrepreneur, pursuing the kinds of niche needs that – at their core – are the underpinnings of the discoveries in biomedicine that we depend upon to heal us when we’re ill. She’s one of many, I’m sure, but is one of the best (I’m sure of that, too). She not only works in the ‘trenches,’ but often goes there first and digs them herself to support the many others who will come later. Her most recent effor...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - May 7, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized biomedical research Genetic Alliance Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, February 25, 2013
This series is brought to you by MedPage Today.1. Pediatricians: Watchful Waiting Best for Ear Infections. Stricter diagnostic criteria and broader use of observation to further rein in antibiotic prescribing for acute otitis media emerged in a revision of American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines.2. Is Evidence-Based Medicine Only an Illusion? In a system where half of all clinical trials never see the light of publication, doctors are merely “imagining that we’re practicing evidence-based medicine,” says Ben Goldacre, MBBS, a British physician and science journalist.3. Asthma Drug Curbs Chronic Hi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Infectious disease Pediatrics Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Antibiotics no good for acute sinusitis?
JAMA 12/5/07 – House of God Law #13: “The delivery of good medical care is to do as much nothing as possible.” The last time we saw this rule at work was with otitis media. A study in JAMA by Williamson et al. sought to see just what good comes from the common practice of prescribing antibiotics and nasal steroids for acute bacterial sinusitis. The study included 240 patients seen by family practitioners in the UK. To be included, the patients had to have 2 or more of the classic clinical diagnostic criteria. No radiology or lab studies were used in diagnosis. Treatment groups were randomized to receive e...
Source: Consider The Evidence: Med/Peds Journal Roundup - December 13, 2007 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: medblog Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs