Review and Implementation of Self-Help and Automated Tools in Mental Health Care
This article describes different self-help and automated technologies, how to implement such technologies in existing clinical services, and how to implement according to patient needs. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Steven Chan, Luming Li, John Torous, David Gratzer, Peter M. Yellowlees Source Type: research

Personalized Implementation of Video Telehealth
This article describes the Personalized Implementation for Video Telehealth strategy to increase adoption of video telehealth to home (VTH) across a large, urban Veterans Health Administration medical center and applications for broader use in non-VHA settings. The authors fully integrated VTH into existing mental health clinics, resulting in (1) a significant increase in the number of patients receiving VTH, (2) a significant increase in the number of VTH visits relative to median national improvement, (3) a greater number of unique specialty mental health clinics offering VTH in Houston, and (4) a greater number of commu...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jan A. Lindsay, Stephanie C. Day, Amber B. Amspoker, Terri L. Fletcher, Julianna Hogan, Giselle Day, Ashley Helm, Melinda A. Stanley, Lindsey A. Martin Source Type: research

Clinical Lessons from Virtual House Calls in Mental Health
This article highlights other potential benefits, adaptations, and considerations for providers interested in expanding their use of VTH to engage patients who are difficult to reach or who have complex presentations. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Julianna Hogan, Derrecka Boykin, Christopher D. Schneck, Anthony H. Ecker, Terri L. Fletcher, Jan A. Lindsay, Jay H. Shore Source Type: research

Current Practices in Electronic Capture of Patient-Reported Outcomes for Measurement-Based Care and the Use of Patient Portals to Support Behavioral Health
This article presents the growing research base on these topics, including discussion of key issues and recommendations for optimal implementation of patient portals in behavioral health settings. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Carolyn L. Turvey, Jan A. Lindsay, Emily E. Chasco, Dawn M. Klein, Lindsey A. Fuhrmeister, Lilian N. Dindo Source Type: research

The Bot Will See You Now
The goal of automating complex human activities dates to antiquity. The mental health field has also made use of advances in technology to assist patients in need. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the study of agents that receive percepts from the environment and perform actions. AI is increasingly being incorporated into the development of chatbots that can be deployed in both clinical and nonclinical settings. Chatbots are a computer program that simulates human conversation through voice commands or text chats or both. The collaboration between AI therapists and more traditional providers of such care will only grow. (So...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joshua R. Moore, Robert Caudill Source Type: research

Intended and Unintended Consequence in the Digital Age of Psychiatry
Culture plays a critical role in shaping the structure, content, and process of psychiatric treatment and influences the use of technology. Mental health providers and health care systems should account for the impact of the interface of technology and culture on clinical processes. Psychiatrists need to assess and monitor the impact of this interface on therapeutic processes. Health care systems should attend to these issues as they develop, adapt, and deploy technologies. As a field, psychiatry needs to develop frameworks for formally evaluating the use of existing and innovating technologies for use in mental health tre...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jay H. Shore Source Type: research

Recommendations for Using Clinical Video Telehealth with Patients at High Risk for Suicide
There is increasing evidence that the delivery of mental health services via clinical video telehealth (CVT) is an effective means of providing services to individuals with access barriers, such as rurality. However, many providers have concerns about working with individuals at risk for suicide via this modality, and many clinical trials have excluded individuals with suicide risk factors. The present article reviews the literature, professional guidelines, and laws that pertain to the provision of mental health services via CVT with high-risk patients and provides suggestions for adapting existing best-practice recommend...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Meghan M. McGinn, Milena S. Roussev, Erika M. Shearer, Russell A. McCann, Sasha M. Rojas, Bradford L. Felker Source Type: research

Establishing Telemental Heath Services from Conceptualization to Powering up
This article provides an overview of a step-by-step planning process to more effectively implement and sustain telemental health programs. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - September 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Matthew C. Mishkind Source Type: research

Assessing Cognition Outside of the Clinic
This article explores the landscape of digital devices used to measure cognition in settings outside the clinic. These devices range in mobility from user-friendly mobile devices to setting-specific devices able to provide powerful, robust cognitive therapy and living assistance in the comfort of a patient ’s home. Although these methods remain in early stages of developmental, initial studies suggest they may prove useful in treating patients with serious mental illnesses in a widespread clinical setting. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - September 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ryan Hays, Philip Henson, Hannah Wisniewski, Victoria Hendel, Aditya Vaidyam, John Torous Source Type: research

Welcome to the Era of Continuous Practice Transformation
We are at an unprecedented historical moment in the history of technological transformation of society. The changes birthed at the end of the twentieth century have accelerated to an exponential pace permeating all aspects of personal and professional life, including medicine and psychiatry. Technology in all its forms has become an integral part of psychiatric practice, precipitating an era of continuous practice adaptation and transformation. For both the individual provider and behavioral health organizations, keeping abreast of these changes can be daunting. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - September 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jay H. Shore Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Social Media Skills for Professional Development in Psychiatry and Medicine
Social media use is increasing in the United States. Because psychiatrists and physicians are becoming more active online, Twitter is emerging as a leading platform for professional development. Social media can enhance networking, serve as a tool for mentoring trainees and colleagues, introduce journal articles to new readers, and allow psychiatrists and physicians to advocate for health care issues. Psychiatrists and physicians should observe ethical standards for digital citizenship on Twitter and other social media platforms. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Howard Y. Liu, Eugene V. Beresin, Margaret S. Chisolm Source Type: research

Embracing Diversity and Inclusion in Psychiatry Leadership
Recognizing and embracing culture, diversity, and inclusion is essential to the practice of high-quality clinical care in medicine and, more specifically, in psychiatry. When leadership lacks diversity, the organizational policies and norms may skew toward devaluing the importance of diversity and inclusion. Considering the significant underrepresentation at the academic faculty level, substantive individual and systemic efforts are required to recruit, retain, and advance a diverse and inclusive student pipeline and faculty in academic psychiatry. For meaningful progress to be made, leaders in psychiatry must resemble an ...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kari A. Simonsen, Ruth S. Shim Source Type: research

Mobile Health, Smartphone/Device, and Apps for Psychiatry and Medicine
This article outlines these competencies and aligns them with clinical care, teaching methods, and evaluation. These competencies have similarities and differences from in-person and telepsychiatric care and additional dimensions like clinical decision support, technology selection, and information flow management across an e-platform. Health systems must integrate in-person and technology-based care, while maintaining the therapeutic relationship. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Donald M. Hilty, Steven Chan, John Torous, John Luo, Robert J. Boland Source Type: research

Professional Development for Clinical Faculty in Academia
Clinical faculty need creative, systematic, and supportive approaches for their success. Academic institutions and departments have a unique opportunity to engage its faculty by sponsoring and creating innovative professional development programs to enhance leadership, research, teaching, and clinical skills. The added benefit of these “homegrown” programs is that clinical faculty members feel more valued, engaged, and supported and will want to better align their priorities with the strategic priorities of the institution. There are excellent national resources to learn from to support and complement local pro...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Douglas Ziedonis, Mary S. Ahn Source Type: research

Low-Resource Project-Based Interprofessional Development with Psychiatry Faculty
Projects done in interprofessional groups can foster faculty development with minimal resources beyond what is already available at the university or medical center. Each project can yield multiple “wins” in individual faculty growth while meeting the needs of academic medical centers. These projects can build collaborative skills and a sense of community among faculty, trainees, and staff. The combination of low costs, high yields, and improvements in team skills make these approaches app ealing and sustainable in resource-constrained medical centers. The authors describe 4 sample projects and their teams, nee...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Erica Z. Shoemaker, Myo Thwin Myint, Shashank V. Joshi, Donald M. Hilty Source Type: research

Lifelong Learning for Professional Development in Psychiatry
The American Board of Medical Specialties, which includes the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, promotes standards focusing on changes in physicians ’ medical knowledge and skills. The authors describe the literature concerning the effectiveness of lifelong learning. They review the status of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology Maintenance of Certification program as an example of a model of lifelong learning, including an innovativ e pilot. The final sections include a discussion of new innovations to consider in continuing professional development and a reflection about the state of lifelong le...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jeffrey Hunt, Elizabeth Brannan, Sandra Sexson Source Type: research

Professional Development for Psychiatrists
PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Howard Y. Liu, Donald M. Hilty Source Type: research

Copyright
Elsevier (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Contributors
HARSH K. TRIVEDI, MD, MBA (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Contents
Howard Y. Liu and Donald M. Hilty (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Forthcoming Issues
Integrating Technology into 21st Century Psychiatry: Telemedicine, Social Media, and other Technologies (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

The Central Role of Professional Development and Psychiatry
The pace of new knowledge and new skills is ever accelerating in health care. Professional development (PD) is necessary to equip physicians and other health care providers with the skills to adapt to new roles, respond to challenges, and integrate new knowledge into their clinical practices. In this issue, Hilty and colleagues have defined PD as a wide variety of specialized training, formal education, and/or advanced professional learning intended to help clinicians, teachers, researchers, and administrators improve their professional knowledge, competence, skill, and effectiveness. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Howard Y. Liu, Donald M. Hilty Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Coaching Health Care Leaders and Teams in Psychiatry
Ongoing professional development is essential across the career development life span. Coaching is emerging as an effective intervention to support career, personal, and leadership development of both individuals and teams in health care, given the high levels of volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity that our physicians and organizations face. Coaches, in contrast to mentors, avoid giving direct advice to clients, while still providing self-awareness and other-awareness and accountability to their goals. The use of coaches increases the flexibility of supporting our psychiatrists with a team of supporters, dis...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Mary S. Ahn, Douglas Ziedonis Source Type: research

The Physician ’s Physician
Psychiatrists have valuable training, knowledge, and experience to serve as champions for physician health. The prevalence of physician burnout, suicide, and depression negatively affects the health care system at a critical time when the country faces a physician shortage, increasing costs, and a push toward higher quality of care. Psychiatrists are in prime position to serve as the “Physician’s Physician” and lead their organizations to increase awareness, build capacity, and drive cultural change. New leadership opportunities exist for psychiatrists, including the role of chief wellness officer, servin...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Keisuke Nakagawa, Peter M. Yellowlees Source Type: research

Role of Technology in Faculty Development in Psychiatry
Clinicians, interprofessional teams, organizational systems, and patients increasingly use technology for health and health care, communication, networking, and business. In this era of ubiquitous connectivity, the digital age has solidified the role of technology in continuing medical education, faculty development, and integrating professional and personal roles and identities. Clinicians are shifting from treating technology as a supplemental modality to using it as a central organizing and facilitating tool, particularly important for clinical care. This is known as an information technology-business-medicine understan...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - July 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Donald M. Hilty, Jessica Uno, Steven Chan, John Torous, Robert Boland Source Type: research

Continuing Professional Development
This article (1) outlines the importance of CPD, (2) describes potential systematic approaches to CPD and potential ways to assess their effectiveness, and (3) reviews resources available to incorporate into a systematic approach. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - June 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kenneth P. Drude, Marlene Maheu, Donald M. Hilty Source Type: research

A Narrative on Career Transitions in Academic Psychiatry
Navigating and negotiating the stages from instructor to assistant, associate, and full professor to chair is an exciting, if at times exhausting, journey. Becoming a member of an academic department has the allure, and burden, of participating in, and supporting a community of scholars. In addition to proceeding through their career considerations, faculty members go through their own adult developmental stages. Suggested issues to consider that may enhance faculty members ’ opportunities in academia are listed. The tenure rules and the culture of each department, plus the priorities of the chair, become important w...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - June 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Frederick G. Guggenheim Source Type: research

Advanced Leadership Training
Many leaders consider engaging in formal leadership training that results in the award of a degree. Choosing from several options requires careful consideration given the cost, effort, and attention required for successful completion. Individuals should have a clear understanding as to motivation for pursuing an advanced degree and should be able to clearly articulate what they hope to gain. If the motivation is driven by desire for yet another credential, one is ill advised to enroll in a program. Graduate degrees in business, health administration, public administration, public health, medical management, and organizatio...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - June 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: R. Kevin Grigsby Source Type: research

Developmental Approaches to Faculty Development
An academic career goes through developmental stages and faculty have different needs as they progress through these stages. Faculty development initiatives can target these developmental needs. Early career faculty develop their clinical and academic identities and benefit from orientation programs and mentorship. Mid-career faculty engage in role transitions, consolidating their careers, and focusing on productivity and generativity. They benefit from programs that provide new skills, including leadership skills. Advanced career faculty focus on professional-personal integration, contributing to a community, and changes ...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - June 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John Teshima, Alastair J.S. McKean, Myo Thwin Myint, Shadi Aminololama-Shakeri, Shashank V. Joshi, Andreea L. Seritan, Don Hilty Source Type: research

Defining Professional Development in Medicine, Psychiatry, and Allied Fields
Professional development refers to training, formal education, and/or advanced professional learning intended to help clinicians, teachers, researchers, and administrators improve their professional knowledge and effectiveness. Institutions have been trying to adapt to a rapidly changing internal and external environment, with resource constraints and competitive health care. Professional development may be contextualized using adult development, educational, and organizational perspectives, and most best practices overlap. Key partners are faculty, departments, institutions, and national organizations. Interprofessional, ...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - June 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Donald M. Hilty, Howard Y. Liu, Dorothy Stubbe, John Teshima Source Type: research

A Historical Review of Key Events and Components of Faculty and Professional Development in Psychiatry
Psychiatry ’s evolution has entailed clinical, educational, research, and administrative missions. Faculty development efforts concern ways in which professional identity, attitudes and skills are transmitted and enhanced from generation to generation. Top-down efforts by national and international organizat ions and bottom-up movements by individuals in numerous local settings have helped faculty and guided the profession forward. Organizations have provided new faculty with access to mentors and peers across the country, training opportunities, and up-to-date information on emerging scientific, pedago gical, and re...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - June 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Donald M. Hilty, Joel Yager, Andreea Seritan, Ruth Levine, Sandra M. DeJong, Jonathan Borus Source Type: research

Interpersonal Psychotherapy and the Treatment of Eating Disorders
This article describes the core components and elements of IPT, the empirical evidence that supports its effectiveness, efforts to increase the dissemination and implementation of IPT, and future directions. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Anna M. Karam, Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft, Marian Tanofsky-Kraff, Denise E. Wilfley Source Type: research

Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa
Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are mental illnesses with associated complications affecting all body systems with arguably the highest mortality of all mental health disorders. A comprehensive medical evaluation is an essential first step in the treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Weight restoration and cessation of purging behaviors are often essential components in the management of medical complications of these illnesses. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dennis Gibson, Cassandra Workman, Philip S. Mehler Source Type: research

Involuntary Treatment and Quality of Life
The issues centering on the involuntary treatment of severe and enduring anorexia nervosa are daunting. There is a general consensus that people with this illness are likely to have high levels of disability, be underemployed/unemployed, and receive welfare. Anorexia nervosa shows a similar degree of impairment to those with depression or schizophrenia on quality-of-life measures. It is possible to mount a cogent argument as to why a rehabilitation model of care needs to be considered for those with persistent eating disorders. In such cases, harm minimization and improved quality of life should be prioritized and involunt...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Terry Carney, Joel Yager, Sarah Maguire, Stephen William Touyz Source Type: research

Eating Disorder Prevention
This article (1) reviews risk factors that have been shown to predict future onset of eating disorders, because this should guide the content of prevention programs and high-risk subgroups to target with selective prevention programs; (2) reviews the evidence base for eating disorder prevention programs that have reduced eating disorder symptoms or future onset of eating disorders; and (3) discusses directions for future research. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Eric Stice, Sarah Johnson, Roxane Turgon Source Type: research

The Second Wave of Public Policy Advocacy for Eating Disorders
Over the past decade, a first wave of US public policy advocacy for eating disorders made substantial progress, with passage of the federal 21st Century Cures Act in 2016 as its crowning achievement. However, the US response to eating disorders continues to fall short in several ways. On the cusp of a second wave of policy advocacy, efforts must be broadened to target structural determinants of illness and inequities to maximize clinical impact and diminish suffering. Mental health clinicians, patients, and their families will be essential players in public policy advocacy efforts in this regard. (Source: The Psychiatric C...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: S. Bryn Austin, Rebecca Hutcheson, Shalini Wickramatilake-Templeman, Katrina Velasquez Source Type: research

Problematic Eating Behaviors and Eating Disorders Associated with Bariatric Surgery
Bariatric surgery candidates often report problematic and/or eating disordered behaviors. For most patients, these eating behaviors improve after surgery. A subset, however, experience a recurrence or new onset of problematic eating behaviors as early as 2 months to 18  months after surgery, which can result in compromised weight loss/excessive weight regain. Those most at risk are individuals with comorbid psychopathology (ie, loss-of-control eating or depression) after surgery. For some, such problems are present before surgery. Therefore, it is critical to mon itor patients closely after surgery so that appropriate...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Cassie S. Brode, James E. Mitchell Source Type: research

New Developments in the Clinical Treatment of Eating Disorders
The eating disorders, because of their etiologic complexity and significant morbidity and mortality, often wreak havoc on patients and their families and pose vexing clinical challenges to treating clinicians. We were so very pleased that the Psychiatric Clinics of North America recognized the critical need for a comprehensive update on these serious illnesses and asked us to gather a group of the most renowned and distinguished international leaders in our field to collaborate in providing it. In part 1, we address the core issues in the diagnosis and classification of the major eating disorders as well as review some of ...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Harry A. Brandt, Steven F. Crawford Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Eating Disorders: Part II
PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Harry A. Brandt, Steven F. Crawford Source Type: research

Copyright
Elsevier (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Contributors
HARSH K. TRIVEDI, MD, MBA (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Contents
Harry A. Brandt and Steven F. Crawford (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Forthcoming Issues
Professional Development for Psychiatrists (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Behavioral Interventions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders
Behavioral methods are inherent in many evidence-based treatments of eating disorders and have also been used separately. This review demonstrates that behavioral methods are necessary in the effective treatment of eating disorders —in particular, the improvement of nutrition and exposure-based methods. It is also possible that these methods are sufficient to treat anorexia nervosa, although other elements are needed on the treatment of bulimia nervosa. The impacts and mechanisms of behavioral and nutritional change merit se rious attention in clinical work and research. Clinicians are often reluctant, however, to us...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Glenn Waller, Bronwyn Raykos Source Type: research

Family-based Treatment of Eating Disorders
Eating disorders (EDs) are serious psychiatric illnesses that typically develop during adolescence or young adulthood, indicating that individuals with EDs may benefit from early intervention. Family-based treatment is the leading treatment of youth with anorexia nervosa, with increasing evidence of its efficacy for youth with bulimia nervosa. This review describes the role of family engagement within family-based treatment of EDs, followed by a summary of current empirically supported, family-based ED interventions. It concludes with discussion of the ways in which family interventions are expanding and adapting to improv...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Sasha Gorrell, Katherine Loeb, Daniel Le Grange Source Type: research

Emerging Psychological Treatments in Eating Disorders
The authors present the theoretic model, structure of treatment, and preliminary evidence for several emerging treatments that are increasingly being used and studied in eating disorders treatment, including dialectical behavior therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, integrative cognitive-affective therapy, and neuromodulation. In addition, the article discusses treatments that address mindfulness, interpersonal factors, and habit. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Emily M. Pisetsky, Lauren M. Schaefer, Stephen A. Wonderlich, Carol B. Peterson Source Type: research

Self-Help Treatment of Eating Disorders
The authors provide an overview of the current state of research on self-help interventions for eating disorders. The efficacy of different forms of self-help interventions for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other eating disorders at various stages of the care pathway (from prevention to relapse prevention) is described. Cost-effectiveness studies are also presented. Moderators of outcome, such as guidance and adherence, are discussed. Overall, the findings are promising and support the use of self-help interventions in the treatment of bulimic disorders, across the stages of the care pathway. Less is known ab...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: See Heng Yim, Ulrike Schmidt Source Type: research

Pharmacologic Treatment of Eating Disorders
Medications are a useful adjunct to nutritional and psychotherapeutic treatments for eating disorders. Antidepressants are commonly used to treat bulimia nervosa; high-dose fluoxetine is a standard approach, but many other antidepressants can be used. Binge eating disorder can be treated with antidepressants, with medications that diminish appetite, or with lisdexamfetamine. Anorexia nervosa does not generally respond to medications, although recent evidence supports modest weight restoration benefits from olanzapine. (Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America)
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Scott J. Crow Source Type: research

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for the Eating Disorders
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder and is regarded as the first-line treatment for both eating disorders. An enhanced version of the treatment (CBT-E) appears more effective in treating patients with severe comorbidity. There is less evidence that CBT is effective for the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Evidence suggests that CBT-E is no more effective than specialist care involving regular medical follow-up and supportive psychotherapy in the persistent adult form of anorexia nervosa (AN). Early studies suggest that CBT-E may be useful in treating...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: William Stewart Agras Source Type: research

Clinician-Delivered Teletherapy for Eating Disorders
The delivery of teletherapy is an important advancement in clinical care for the treatment of eating disorders (EDs). Specifically, it seems to improve access to highly specialized ED treatment. Research on the application of videoconferencing-based psychotherapy services for EDs is minimal; however, results suggest that this treatment format leads to significant improvements in clinical symptoms and is well accepted by patients. General telemedicine guidelines and administrative and clinical recommendations specific to the treatment of ED patients have been identified. With careful planning and thoughtful application, Int...
Source: The Psychiatric Clinics of North America - April 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Laura Elizabeth Sproch, Kimberly Peddicord Anderson Source Type: research