Impact of metabolic surgery on health-related quality of life and quality of alimentation
There is an epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the world today. The relationship of the two diseases is closely knit, and there is difficulty in controlling these through current medical treatments and lifestyle modifications, which include diet, drug therapy, and behavior conditioning. There is strong evidence that support bariatric surgery as an effective method to control T2DM in morbidly obese patients with a body mass index (BMI) beyond 35 kg/m2 [1,2]. Recently, several randomized control trials have justified the use of bariatric surgery as a viable treatment for T2DM with BMI less than 35 kg/m2 [3]. (...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 21, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Yosuke Seki, Setthasiri Pantanakul, Kazunori Kasama, Eri Kikkawa, Tetsuya Nakazato, Jose Paolo Porciuncula Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Improvement in Pulmonary Function in Asthmatic Patients after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Asthma is a common respiratory disorder that affects 1 in 13 people, and at least 25 million people in the United States have asthma [1,2]. Another evolving public health problem is obesity, which is a condition that affects millions of Americans and that causes a large and growing economic burden on healthcare systems in the US [3]. Many observational studies found and reported association between asthma and obesity. Increased rates of prevalence of, disease exacerbation in, and risk of hospitalization for asthma are reported in obese patients [4-6]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 21, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Sikarin Upala, Subhanudh Thavaraputta, Anawin Sanguankeo Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

The obscure role of genetics on weight loss after bariatric surgery
Obesity is a multifactorial complex disease. Thus, despite the new evidence that genetics influences obesity, it is necessary to consider that biological and psychosocial factors interact in a complex way. In combination with environmental influences, genes are up to 70% responsible for body's weight [1]. Many of the selected genes play critical roles in either the metabolic or neuropsychiatric pathways contributing to obesity. Genetics play an obscure role in both obesity [2] and weight loss outcomes after surgery [3]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 20, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Susmit Kosta, Mohit Bhandari, Winni Mathur, Mathias Fobi Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Reply letter to the editor: Mid-term outcomes of sleeve gastrectomy in the elderly
This study analyzed 55 patients in total, and with this low number of patients, the statistical power is limited. Still, we performed a univariate analysis to try and detect any risk factors that could potentially increase the risk of ble eding. None of the parameters demonstrated an association with bleeding. Patients who were treated with any sort of blood thinners, such as aspirin or low molecular weight heparin, did not display a tendency for postoperative bleeding (.06 [−.11; .25] .44). (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 20, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Dvir Froylich, Christopher R. Daigle, David Hazzan Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding on 3566 patients up to 20-year follow-up: long-term results of a standardized technique
Obesity is a chronic disease worldwide, increasing with exponential growth. Bariatric surgery is the most effective long-term treatment for morbid obesity regarding weight loss and comorbidity reduction. Laparoscopic surgery, a minimally invasive, safe technique, made the bariatric operations possible and positively entered the world of obesity [1,2]. Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) was the first operation proposed for a laparoscopic approach, because of its safety and replicability, and quickly became one of the most common bariatric surgical operations. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 20, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Niccol ò Furbetta, Francesca Gragnani, Giuseppe Flauti, Francesco Guidi, Francesco Furbetta Tags: Original Article – Retrospective study Source Type: research

Anticoagulant activity of enoxaparin and unfractionated heparin for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in obese patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy
While bariatric surgical procedures have shown improvements in safety, the mitigation of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk and iatrogenic events associated with anticoagulant chemoprophylaxis requires further investigation. Obesity is a significant risk factor for VTE development and the proposed mechanisms include increased inflammation [1], increased thrombin generation [2], and greater platelet reactivity compared to individuals without obesity [3,4]. Chemoprophylaxis has been shown to reduce VTE risk, but also increases bleeding risk, complicating surgery and increase transfusion requirements [5]. (Source: Surgery for ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 20, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Luigi Brunetti, Andrew Wassef, Ragui Sadek, Kiran Desphande, Jane Ziegler, Sung Shin Na, Paul Riley, Leonid Kagan Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

The Obscure Role of Genetics on Weight-Loss Following Bariatric Surgery
Obesity is a multifactorial complex disease. Thus, despite the new evidence that genetics influences obesity, it is necessary to consider that biological and psychosocial factors interact in a complex way. Combination with environmental influences, genes are up to 70% responsible for body's weight [1]. Many of the selected genes play critical roles in either the metabolic or neuropsychiatric pathways contributing to obesity. Genetics play an obscure role in both obesity [2] and weight-loss outcomes after surgery [3]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 20, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Susmit Kosta, Mohit Bhandari, Winni Mathur, Mathias Fobi Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply Letter to the Editor “Mid-term outcomes of sleeve gastrectomy in the elderly”
This study analyzed 55 patients in total, and with this low number of patients, the statistical power is limited. Still, we performed a univariate analysis to try and detect any risk factors that could potentially increase the risk of ble eding. None of the parameters demonstrated an association with bleeding. Patients who were treated with any sort of blood thinners such as Aspirin or LMWH did not display a tendency for post-operative bleeding [0.06 (-0.11;0.25) 0.44]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 20, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Dvir Froylich, Christopher R. Daigle, David Hazzan Source Type: research

Response Letter to the Editor
First, I would like to thank Dr. Liu et al for his comments on the article “Early intake of solid food after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and complications. A cohort study from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry” [1]. Propensity score matching is valuable tool for matching patients but as far as I am aware it has not been used for matching five groups which would be necessary to make the comparison done in the paper above. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 18, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: David Edholm Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Eating self-efficacy as predictor of long-term weight loss and obesity-specific quality of life after sleeve gastrectomy: A prospective cohort study
Sleeve gastrectomy has globally become a preferred bariatric surgery treatment option, in which persistent ( ≥5 yr) postoperative weight loss and remission of co-morbidities are achieved in a majority of patients [1]. However, inadequate weight loss or weight regain is a concern after all bariatric procedures, [2,3]. Obesogenic environments and compensatory neurobiologic mechanisms to hedonic eating are known barriers to weight loss maintenance [4,5]. On the other hand, specific self-regulating attitudes may potentially override weight driving forces, by providing a sense of control, and may be important factors in dete...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 14, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Tone Nygaard Fl ølo, Grethe S. Tell, Ronette L. Kolotkin, Anny Aasprang, Tone M. Norekvål, V. Våge, John R. Andersen Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Eating self-efficacy as a predictor of long-term weight loss and obesity-specific quality of life after sleeve-gastrectomy. A prospective cohort study
Sleeve gastrectomy has globally become a preferred bariatric surgery treatment option, in which persistent ( ≥ 5 years) postoperative weight loss and remission of comorbidities are achieved in a majority of patients [1]. However, inadequate weight loss or weight regain is a concern after all bariatric procedures [2, 3]. Obesogenic environments and compensatory neurobiological mechanisms to hedonic eating are known barriers to weight loss maintenance [4, 5]. On the other hand, specific self-regulating attitudes may potentially override weight driving forces, by providing a sense of control, and may be important factors i...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 14, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Tone Nygaard Fl ølo, Grethe S. Tell, Ronette L. Kolotkin, Anny Aasprang, Tone M. Norekvål, V. Våge, John R. Andersen Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Comment on the article Metabolic Surgery Ameliorates Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Diabetic patients: Influence of different Surgical Procedures
We read with interest the recent paper by Wei, Jih-Hua et al.1 Briefly, authors evaluated cardiovascular disease risk after metabolic surgery in 392 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients using UKPDS score and investigated the efficacy of different bariatric/metabolic procedures on cardiovascular disease risk reduction. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 13, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Humberto Rafael Silva Licera, Maria Antoinette Almeyda Yglesias Source Type: research

Comment on: Bariatric surgery improves the employment rate in people with obesity: 2-year analysis
It is well established that obesity poses significant challenges to people's health and social wellbeing, with high prevalence of health problems, discrimination, and stigma associated with obesity in our society. While numerous studies have been published reporting positive impact of bariatric surgery on health outcomes, little is known about the effect of bariatric surgery on employment opportunities of the patients. In this issue of SOARD, an article entitled “Bariatric surgery improves the employment rate in people with obesity: 2-year analysis” by Mancini et al. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 13, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Shalkar Adambekov, Faina Linkov Tags: Invited Paired Editorial Source Type: research

How safe is bariatric surgery in patients with class I obesity (body mass index 30 –35 kg/m2)?
The safety profile of bariatric surgery in patients with class I obesity, or body mass index ≥30 and (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Xiaoxi Feng, Amin Andalib, Stacy A. Brethauer, Philip R. Schauer, Ali Aminian Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Reply letter to the editor metabolic surgery ameliorates cardiovascular risk in obese diabetic patients: influence of different surgical procedures
We thank the authors for their interest and comments on our article “Metabolic surgery ameliorates cardiovascular risk in obese diabetic patients: influence of different surgical procedures” [1]. Owing to the increasing obesity epidemic, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming a major health issue, in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that>425 million individuals were affected by T2D worldwide in 2017, with a global prevalence of 1 in 11 (9.9%) adults [2]. Therefore, T2D becomes a more important health issue than obesity in some areas of the world. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Jih-Hua Wei, Wei-Jei Lee, Shing-Jong Lin, Po-Hsun Huang Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Reply Letter to the Editor “Metabolic Surgery Ameliorates Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Diabetic Patients: Influence of Different Surgical Procedures”
We thank the authors for their interest and comments on our article “Metabolic Surgery Ameliorates Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Diabetic Patients: Influence of Different Surgical Procedures” [1]. Owing to the increasing of obesity epidemic, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is becoming a major health issue, in both developed and developing countries. It is estimate d that more than 425 million individuals were affected by T2DM worldwide in 2017 with a global prevalence of 1(9.9%) in 11 adults [2]. Therefore, T2D becomes an important health issue than obesity in some areas of the world. (Source: Surgery for Obesity...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Jih-Hua Wei, Wei-Jei Lee, Shing-Jong Lin, Po-Hsun Huang Tags: Letter to Editor Source Type: research

Bariatric Surgery improves Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Contemporary Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
The epidemic of obesity in Western countries is accompanied by a dramatic increase in the prevalence of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in both adults and adolescents [1]. The prevalence of NAFLD is projected to increase to 33.5% among adults by 2030; consequently the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver related deaths are estimated to increase by 137% and 178% respectively, in the same time frame [2]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Tannous K. Fakhry, Rahul Mhaskar, Theresa Schwitalla, Elnara Muradova, John Paul Gonzalvo, Michel M Murr Tags: Controversies in Bariatric Surgery Source Type: research

Barriers to Bariatric Surgery: Factors Influencing Progression to Bariatric Surgery in a U.S. Metropolitan Area
Bariatric surgery is an effective and durable treatment for obesity. However, the number of patients that progress to bariatric surgery after initial evaluation remains low. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Tammy Ju, Lisbi Rivas, Suzanne Arnott, Samantha Olafson, Ashlyn Whitlock, Andrew Sparks, Ivy N. Haskins, Paul P. Lin, Khashayar Vaziri Source Type: research

A Longitudinal Examination of Suicide-Related Thoughts and Behaviors among Bariatric Surgery Patients
Approximately 15% of U.S. adults have severe obesity (body mass index; BMI ≥35 kg/m²). [1] Bariatric surgery, the most effective and enduring treatment, typically results in sustained weight loss and improvement in multiple health domains with low short-term risk. [2–3] Bariatric surgery patients have reduced long-term all-cause mortality when compared to non-bariatri c surgical controls with severe obesity. [4] However, concerns about suicide risk following bariatric surgery have emerged. [4,5] (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Kathryn H Gordon, Wendy C King, Gretchen E White, Steven H Belle, Anita P Courcoulas, Faith E Ebel, Scott G Engel, Dave R Flum, Marcelo W Hinojosa, Alfons Pomp, Walter J Pories, Dino Spaniolas, Bruce M Wolfe, Susan Z. Yanovski, James E Mitchell Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Endometrial Cancer and Bariatric Surgery: A Scoping Review
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in developed countries, and the fourth most common cause of cancer in women [1]. In 2012, there were an estimated 319 600 new cases of uterine cancer worldwide [2]. Women in developed countries have a 2.8% lifetime risk of developing uterine cancer, most common being Type 1, or estrogen-sensitive [1]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Christa Aubrey, Kristin Black, Sandy Campbell, Sophia Pin Tags: Controversies in Bariatric Surgery Source Type: research

Clinical Safety and Effectiveness of a Swallowable Gas-filled Intragastric Balloon System for Weight Loss: Consecutively Treated Patients in the Initial Year of US Commercialization
Recently, endoscopic bariatric therapies, including intragastric balloons, have emerged as treatment options with the potential to fill the unmet need of patients who have obesity, but are currently undertreated [1]. Intragastric balloons have less weight loss than bariatric surgery but are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in lower Body Mass Index (BMI) categories and some without the requirement for an obesity-related co-morbidity [2-7]. Providing options in addition to weight loss surgery may increase overall obesity treatment rates. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Rachel L. Moore, Michael V. Seger, Shawn M. Garber, Adam B. Smith, Richard T. Nguyen, Moses K. Shieh, Robert G. Snow, Shelby Sullivan Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

How Safe is Bariatric Surgery in Patients with Class I obesity (Body mass index 30-35 kg/m2)?
Bariatric surgery is known to have positive effects on various aspects of metabolic syndrome and weight-related comorbidities [1 –6]. The current body mass index (BMI) recommendation cutoff of 35kg/m2 for bariatric surgery was established in 1991 by the National Institutes of Health consensus guidelines [7]. Meanwhile, incidence of obesity and its associated chronic illnesses, such as hypertension, diabetes, sleep apnea, et c, continue to increase [8]. An increasing portion of the population is categorized as having class I obesity (defined as BMI ≥30 and (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Xiaoxi Feng, Amin Andalib, Stacy A. Brethauer, Philip R. Schauer, Ali Aminian Tags: Originial Article Source Type: research

Does the RYGB Common Limb Length influence Hypertension Remission and CardioMetabolic Risk Factors? Data from the GATEWAY TRIAL.
Laparoscopic Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) is a standardised metabolic and bariatric procedure that results in significant weight loss and cardiometabolic risk factors improvement. However, there is no consensus on how these results may be influenced by limbs length. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Marco Nunziante, Farouk Dargai, Radwan Kassir Source Type: research

Value-Based Insurance Coverage for Bariatric Surgery: Time for Surgeons to Lead the Change
The journey toward insurance coverage for bariatric surgery has been tortuous and haphazard. Despite the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery, private insurance coverage of bariatric surgery varies widely. For example, bariatric surgery coverage is determined as an “essential health benefit” in 23 of 50 states,1 and the essential health benefit policy applies only to insurance plans in the ACA's individual and small group marketplaces—not to employer-sponsored insurance, which represents the majority of bariatric surgery patients. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 5, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Karan R. Chhabra, Justin B. Dimick, A. Mark Fendrick Source Type: research

Strength in Numbers
A familiar expression is “There is strength in numbers”. In their report, Long-term outcomes of bariatric surgery in adolescents with morbid obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years: A systematic review1, Arturo-Cruz et al examine studies of adolescents who underwent bariatric surgical procedures and had follow-up o f 5 or more years. Following careful screening guidelines, they were able to identify just 10 publications totaling 455 subjects, ages 10 through 19 years, distributed among three different surgical interventions. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 5, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Dr Jeffrey Zitsman Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Finally, a reason to change the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This excellent paper by Zorrilla-Nunez et al. [1] reviews the body of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass literature concerning limb lengths. They findthat the biliopancreatic limb is the most important measurement in determining outcomes, whereas the Roux limb length plays no effect in long-term outcomes. However, this paper could have just as easily said bypassing more intestine is better. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Daniel Rhead Cottam Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Chronic Petersen's internal hernia after omega-loop gastric bypass: Radiologic-surgical correlation
Figs. 1 and 2. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Adrian Mancini, Janet Guevel-Tavolini, Fabian Reche Tags: Image in surgery Source Type: research

Chronic Petersen's internal hernia following omega-loop gastric bypass: radiologic-surgical correlation
Adrian Mancini, Janet Guevel-Tavolini and Fabian Reche have no conflict of interest to disclose. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Adrian Mancini, Janet Guevel-Tavolini, Fabian Reche Source Type: research

Finally A Reason To Change The Roux en Y Gastric Bypass
This excellent paper by Rosenthal et al1 reviews the body of RYGBP literature concerning limb lengths. They find interestingly that the biliopancreatic limb is the most important measurement in determining outcomes while the Roux limb length plays no effect in long term outcomes. However, this paper could just have easily said bypassing more intestine is better. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Daniel Rhead Cottam Source Type: research

Comment on: finally, a reason to change the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This excellent paper by Zorrilla-Nunez et al. [1] reviews the body of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass literature concerning limb lengths. They findthat the biliopancreatic limb is the most important measurement in determining outcomes, whereas the Roux limb length plays no effect in long-term outcomes. However, this paper could have just as easily said bypassing more intestine is better. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Daniel Rhead Cottam Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 1, 2018 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 1, 2018 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

SOARD Category 1 CME Credit Featured Articles, Volume 14, October 2018
Kara J. Kallies, Luis D. Ramirez, Brandon T. Grover, Shanu N. Kothari (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 1, 2018 Category: Surgery Tags: CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Source Type: research

Cartoon
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 1, 2018 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Comment on: replication and extension of dietary adherence as a predictor of suboptimal weight loss outcomes in postbariatric patients
The million dollar question in bariatric surgery has always focused on preoperative predictors of success after surgery, but to no avail. Most papers conclude that with the exception of a few clear-cut preoperative conditions, there are few reasons to deny the potentially life-saving bariatric surgery to someone who could potentially benefit. Why then, is access to bariatric surgery so fraught with insurance barriers to force compliance before treatment for obesity is approved? (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 30, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Nina Crowley Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Paired Editorial: Five-year changes in dietary intake and body composition in adolescents with severe obesity undergoing Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery
Metabolic Bariatric Surgery (MBS) is an effective weight loss treatment for severe obesity in adolescents, but weight loss and weight loss maintenance is highly variable. There is great interest in advancing our understanding of predictors of individual responses to MBS to optimize durable outcomes. Because dietary intake plays a substantial role in weight loss and weight loss maintenance, there is value in examining associations between health outcomes and dietary intake pre- and post-MBS. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 30, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Paula Holland Price Source Type: research

Comment on: Replication and Extension of Dietary Adherence as a Predictor of Suboptimal Weight-Loss Outcomes in Post-bariatric Patients
The million-dollar question in bariatric surgery has always focused on preoperative predictors of success following surgery, but to no avail. Most papers conclude that with the exception of a few clear-cut preoperative conditions, there are few reasons to deny the potentially life-saving bariatric surgery to someone who could potentially benefit. Why then, is access to bariatric surgery so fraught with insurance barriers to force compliance to before approval for treatment for obesity is approved? (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 30, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Nina Crowley Source Type: research

Comment on: Five-year changes in dietary intake and body composition in adolescents with severe obesity undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery
Metabolic bariatric surgery (MBS) is an effective weight loss treatment for severe obesity in adolescents, but weight loss and weight loss maintenance is highly variable. There is great interest in advancing our understanding of predictors of individual responses to metabolic bariatric surgery to optimize durable outcomes. Because dietary intake plays a substantial role in weight loss and weight loss maintenance, there is value in examining associations between health outcomes and dietary intake before and after MBS. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 30, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Paula Holland Price Source Type: research

Cost-effectiveness of enhanced recovery pathway in bariatric surgery: It is not all about length of stay
The prevalence of obesity is on the rise, currently affecting more than one third of the U.S. population [1]. The risk of obesity stems from the morbidities to which it predisposes, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), coronary artery disease, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) [2 –4]. Randomized controlled trials have shown the limited efficacy and durability of various lifestyle modifications and medical interventions for treatment of severe obesity [5,6]. Bariatric surgery, on the other hand, has been shown to be safe with robust, long-term outcomes [6–8]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 28, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Essa M. Aleassa, Ali Aminian, Stacy Brethauer, Toms Augustin Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Cost Effectiveness of Enhanced Recovery Pathway in Bariatric Surgery; It is Not All About Length of Stay
The prevalence of obesity is on the rise, currently affecting more than a third of the United States population [1]. The risk of obesity stems from the morbidities it predisposes to, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary artery disease, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) [2 –4]. Randomized controlled trials have shown the limited efficacy and durability of various lifestyle modifications and medical interventions for treatment of severe obesity [5,6]. Bariatric surgery on the other hand has been shown to be safe with robust, long-term outcomes [6–8]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 28, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Essa M. Aleassa, Ali Aminian, Stacy Brethauer, Toms Augustin Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: Good Intentions, Dubious Outcomes
In 1967, Kazi Mobin-Udin was the first to report using a catheter-placed device within the inferior vena cava (IVC) to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) [1]; while revolutionary, his umbrella shaped device was prone to migration and venous thrombosis. The IVC filter (IVCF) developed by Lazar Greenfield in 1973 had fewer complications and by 1981, was developed into a true percutaneous filter, which did not require venotomy. The percutaneous Greenfield filter led to an increase in the indications for and the use of permanent IVC filters. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 28, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: David Overby Source Type: research

Intestinal failure after bariatric surgery: Treatment and outcome at a single-intestinal rehabilitation and transplant center
Though intestinal failure (IF) after bariatric surgery (BS) is uncommon, its prevalence is increasing. However, data on the outcomes for these patients are limited. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 27, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Wethit Dumronggittigule, Elizabeth A. Marcus, Bernard J. DuBray, Robert S. Venick, Erik Dutson, Douglas G. Farmer Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Intestinal failure following bariatric surgery: treatment and outcome at a single intestinal rehabilitation and transplant center
Though intestinal failure (IF) following bariatric surgery (BS) is uncommon, its prevalence is increasing. However, data on the outcomes for these patients is limited. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 27, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Wethit Dumronggittigule, Elizabeth A. Marcus, Bernard J. DuBray, Robert S. Venick, Erik Dutson, Douglas G. Farmer Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Does the RYGB Common Limb Length influence Hypertension Remission and CardioMetabolic Risk Factors? Data from the GATEWAY TRIAL
Although Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) results in significant weight loss and cardiometabolic risk factors improvements; there is no consensus whether limb lengths may influence these results. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 26, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Carlos Aurelio Schiavon, Renato Nakagawa Santos, Eliana Vieira Santucci, Patricia Malvina Noujaim, Alexandre Biasi Cavalcanti, Luciano Ferreira Drager Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Bariatric surgery reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in severe obese subjects undergoing sleeve gastrectomy
Obesity is a major independent risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 24, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: David Gutierrez-Blanco, David Romero Funes, Marco Castillo, Emanuele Lo Menzo, Samuel Szomstein, Raul J. Rosenthal Tags: Original article Source Type: research

The Dutch bariatric weight loss chart: A multicenter tool to assess weight outcome up to 7 years after sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Current methods for weight loss assessment after bariatric surgery do not meet the high standards required to accurately judge patient outcome in a fair and evidence-based way. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 24, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Arnold W. van de Laar, S.W. Nienhuijs, J.A. Apers, A.S. van Rijswijk, J.P. de Zoete, R.P. Gadiot Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Bariatric surgery reduces incidence of atrial fibrillation: a propensity score –matched analysis
Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 33.5 million individuals worldwide [1] and it is estimated that the prevalence of AF in the United States will increase 2- to 3-fold over the next 50 years [2]. Patients with AF are more likely to experience a variety of negative health outcomes, including myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke [3,4]. In addition to these major health risks, there is a significant economic burden associated with AF, amounting to as much as $26 billion in annual healthcare expenditures in the United States alone [5]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 24, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Kevin T. Lynch, J. Hunter Mehaffey, Robert B. Hawkins, Taryn E. Hassinger, Peter T. Hallowell, Jennifer L. Kirby Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Bariatric Surgery Reduces Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis
Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 33.5 million individuals worldwide1, and it is estimated that the prevalence of AF will increase in the United States 2-3 fold over the next 50 years2. Patients with AF are more likely to suffer from a variety of negative health outcomes including myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke3,4. In addition to these major health risks, there is a significant economic burden associated with AF, amounting to as much as $26 billion in annual healthcare expenditures in the US alone5. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 24, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Kevin T. Lynch, J. Hunter Mehaffey, Robert B. Hawkins, Taryn E. Hassinger, Peter T. Hallowell, Jennifer L. Kirby Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Bariatric Surgery Reduces the Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Severe Obese Subjects Undergoing Sleeve Gastrectomy
Obesity and its associated metabolic syndrome have become a major concern and burden for public health in the US and worldwide [1]. Although obesity by itself is detrimental to the overall health and life expectancy of a patient, the most important factors that concern patients and will affect their quality of life and longevity are the obesity-related comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) [2].The relationship between obesity and the development of T2DM is well known. Obesity is considered a major independent risk factor, having been well established several times in the literature with up to 90% of T2DM pa...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 24, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: David Gutierrez-Blanco, David Romero Funes, Marco Castillo, Emanuele Lo Menzo, Samuel Szomstein, Raul J. Rosenthal Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

The Dutch Bariatric Weight Loss Chart: A Multicenter Tool to Assess Weight Outcome up to Seven Years after Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastric Bypass
The outcome of bariatric surgery is undeniably complex. It results in sustained weight-loss far superior to non-surgical measures, it improves health and it positively affects both length and quality of life [1]. Two most striking outcomes are the bariatric effect on overweight and the metabolic effect on type-2 diabetes (T2D). Both effects are currently assessed with criteria for success [2]. Criteria used for the metabolic effect on T2D are evidence based and relate to the severity of the diabetes. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - November 24, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: A.W. van de Laar, S.W. Nienhuijs, J.A. Apers, A.S. van Rijswijk, J.P. de Zoete, R.P. Gadiot Tags: Original articles Source Type: research