Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as day-case surgery: a review of the litterature.
Day-case surgery (DCS) in digestive surgery is a hot topic and new indications for DCS in the field of gastrointestinal surgery have recently been described. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become a very popular bariatric procedure in recent years. LSG is a reproducible, standardized procedure with a short operating time and possibly simple perioperative management. It therefore meets the criteria to be performed as a DCS procedure. Recent published series of LSG as DCS have demonstrated its feasibility. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Lionel Rebibo, Karim K. Maurice, Martin Nimer, Mouna Ben Rehouma, Philippe Montravers, Simon Msika Tags: Review articles Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - March 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - March 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

SOARD Category 1 CME Credit Featured Articles, Volume 15, March 2019
Valentin Mocanu, Jerry Dang, Farah Ladak, Noah Switzer, Daniel W. Birch, Shahzeer Karmali (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - March 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Source Type: research

Psychopathology, Disordered Eating, and Impulsivity as Predictors of Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery
Extreme obesity is associated with a significant psychosocial burden, including impairments in quality of life, body image, sexual behavior, and other areas of psychosocial functioning.1 This distress, along with the physical burden of obesity and its comorbidities, is believed to contribute to the decision to have bariatric surgery. A number of studies have documented the presence of recognized psychiatric diagnoses in bariatric surgery patients and its hypothesized contribution to postoperative outcomes. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 23, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: David B. Sarwer, Kelly C. Allison, Thomas A. Wadden, Rebecca Ashare, Jacqueline C. Spitzer, Courtney McCuen-Wurst, Caitlin LaGrotte, Noel N. Williams, Michael Edwards, Colleen Tewksbury, Jingwei Wu Tags: Controversies in Bariatric Surgery Source Type: research

Preoperative Functional Health Status is a Predictor of Short-term Postoperative Morbidity and Mortality Following Bariatric Surgery
The baby boomer generation will reach age 65 years by 2030 with census projections indicating more adults reaching older age categories than in previous decades [1]. Concurrently, trends indicate that by 2030 over half of the population will be obese, with severe obesity projected to increase by 133% during the same time period [2]. It is prudent to anticipate that our clinics will begin to see an older obese patient population. It has been demonstrated that bariatric surgery can be performed safely in elderly patients, however studies have suggested that age is in itself a suboptimal determinant of post-operative morbidit...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 15, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Kathleen L. Lak, Melissa C. Helm, Rana M. Higgins, Tammy L. Kindel, Jon C. Gould Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Survival Benefit in Bariatric Surgery Kidney Recipients May Be Mediated Through Effects on Kidney Graft Function and Improvement of Co-morbidities: a case-control study
Morbid obesity has been defined by the WHO as a global epidemic. The incidence of obesity among the renal transplant population is on the rise, with obesity-mediated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), dyslipidemia and hypertension, being considered the leading causes of end-stage renal disease. Moreover, gaining weight after transplantation is a very common occurrence in most kidney transplant patients [1], and obesity is an independent risk factor for chronic renal failure [2]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Hilla Schindel, Janos Winkler, Renana Yemini, Idan Carmeli, Eviatar Nesher, Andrei Keidar Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as day-case surgery: a case-matched study
Day-case surgery (DCS) is a hot topic in gastrointestinal surgery. DCS was primarily validated for inguinal hernia repair, cholecystectomy [1] and the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease [2, 3]. New indications for DCS in the field of gastrointestinal surgery have been recently described, such as laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) [4], ileostomy closure [5], colectomy [6] and liver resection [7]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Lionel Rebibo, Abdennaceur Dhahri, Rachid Badaoui, Vincent Hubert, Emmanuel Lorne, Jean-Marc Regimbeau Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Investigating Racial Disparities in Bariatric Surgery Referrals
The prevalence of obesity among adults in the United States between 2011-2014 was approximately 36.5%.(1) Hispanic individuals and African-Americans were disproportionately affected with 42.5% and 48.1% meeting criteria for obesity, respectively. African-American women had the highest obesity rates among groups 56.9%, compared to 45.7% and 35.5% of Hispanic and Caucasian women. More recently, Hales and colleagues noted the prevalence of obesity among adults as of 2015-2016 had increased to 38.6%. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 12, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Crystal Johnson-Mann, Allison N. Martin, Michael D. Williams, Peter T. Hallowell, Bruce Schirmer Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Long-term outcomes of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy versus Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity: results from a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) are two widely used procedures performed in bariatric surgery. However, their long-term weight loss effects have not been well compared. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Ping Yang, Bo Chen, Song Xiang, Xiu-Feng Lin, Fan Luo, Wei Li Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Altered gut microbiome after bariatric surgery and its association with metabolic benefits: A Systematic Review
Bariatric surgery is currently the most successful method for achieving long term weight reduction, with dramatic effects on remission and prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among those with severe obesity [1]. Dietary caloric restriction approaches also achieve rapid improvements in glucose tolerance and weight similar to bariatric surgery in the short term [2,3], but these are more difficult to sustain. One of the key and enigmatic features of successful bariatric surgery is the enhanced ability to feel content with eating fewer calories, rather than simply imposing a mechanical restriction to the amount of calories tha...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 7, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Naomi Davies, Justin M. O'Sullivan, Lindsay D. Plank, Rinki Murphy Source Type: research

The study of single-anastomosis duodenoileal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADI-S) as the revision surgery for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)
I have reviewed with interest the manuscript, “The study of single-anastomosis duodenoileal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADI-S) as the revision surgery for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)” by Wu et al. [1], carried out at a University Hospital in China. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Antonio J. Torres Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Reply to the letter on “gastric bypass specifically impairs liver parameters compared with sleeve gastrectomy, independently of evolution of metabolic disorders”
We thank Anawin Sanguankkeo for his interest in our article [1] and his comments concerning nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in our cohort. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: S éverine Ledoux, Muriel Coupaye Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Comment on: gastric bypass specifically impairs liver parameters compared with sleeve gastrectomy, independently of steatosis evolution: can we improve our procedure selection?
I congratulate the authors for their work with this prospectively collected database and asking important questions about the outcome difference with bariatric surgery. Additional knowledge regarding the outcomes and mechanisms of bariatric surgery can help us improve our match of patient variables with procedure selection. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Teresa LaMasters Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Laparoscopic single-anastomosis duodenal-jejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADJB-SG): Surgical risk and long-term results
I have reviewed with interest the manuscript, “Laparoscopic single anastomosis duodenal-jejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADJB-SG): surgical risk and long-term results” by Ser et al. [1], which focused on a retrospective analysis of a prospective bariatric database. Their experience represents a yearly operation rate of 24 patients ( 148 patients in 6 yr) [1]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Antonio J. Torres Tags: Editorial Comment Source Type: research

Comment on: Gastric bypass specifically impairs liver parameters as compared to sleeve gastrectomy, independently of steatosis evolution – Can we improve our procedure selection?
I congratulate the authors for their work with this prospectively collected database and asking important questions about the outcome difference with bariatric surgery. Additional knowledge regarding the outcomes and mechanisms of bariatric surgery can help us improve our match of patient variables with procedure selection. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Teresa LaMasters Tags: Paired Editorial Source Type: research

“Laparoscopic Single Anastomosis Duodenal-Jejunal Bypass with Sleeve Gastrectomy (SADJB-SG): Surgical risk and long-term results”
I have reviewed with interest the manuscript “Laparoscopic Single Anastomosis Duodenal-Jejunal Bypass with Sleeve Gastrectomy (SADJB-SG): Surgical risk and long-term results” by Lee et al [1], focused on a retrospective analysis of a prospective bariatric database. This experience represents a yearly operated rate of 24 patients (148 patie nts in six years) [1]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Antonio J. Torres Tags: Editorial Comment Source Type: research

“The study of single-anastomosis duodenoileal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADI-S) as the revision surgery for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)”
I have reviewed with interest the manuscript “The study of single-anastomosis duodenoileal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADI-S) as the revision surgery for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) by Wu et al [1], carried out at a University Hospital in China. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Antonio J. Torres Tags: Editorial Comment Source Type: research

Reply to the letter on “Gastric bypass specifically impairs liver parameters as compared to sleeve gastrectomy, independently of evolution of metabolic disorders”
We thank Anawin Sanguankkeo for his interest in our article [1] and his comments concerning non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in our cohort. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: S éverine Ledoux, Muriel Coupaye Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comment on: The study of single-anastomosis duodenoileal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADI-S) as the revision surgery for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)
I have reviewed with interest the manuscript, “The study of single-anastomosis duodenoileal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy (SADI-S) as the revision surgery for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)” by Wu et al. [1], carried out at a University Hospital in China. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 6, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Antonio J. Torres Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Esophagogastric junction function and gastric pressure profile after minigastric bypass compared with Billroth II
Minigastric bypass (MGB) is being performed widely with effective weight loss and improvement in co-morbidities. Because of similarity to Billroth II (BII), there are concerns about bile reflux. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Salvatore Tolone, Mario Musella, Edoardo Savarino, Stefano Cristiano, Ludovico Docimo, Mervyn Deitel Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Esophagogastric Junction Function and Gastric Pressure Profile after Mini-Gastric Bypass (MGB) Compared to Billroth II
Obesity is increasing worldwide, with significant co-morbidities. Bariatric surgery has been shown as the most effective treatment to achieve durable weight loss. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Salvatore Tolone, Mario Musella, Edoardo Savarino, Stefano Cristiano, Ludovico Docimo, Mervyn Deitel Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Time Savings and Accuracy of a Simulated Flexible and Conditional Administration of the MMPI-2-RF in Pre-Surgical Psychological Evaluations of Bariatric Surgery Candidates
Broadband psychological tests like the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) [1] are recommended for use in pre-surgical psychological assessments of bariatric surgery patients [2] because of a research literature supporting the utility of the test in this setting [3 –6]. For example, Marek and colleagues [5] found that scores from the test predicted appointment adherence and weight loss outcomes one-year post-surgery. Nevertheless, psychologists conducting these evaluations tend to administer shorter, more symptom-focused measures rather than broadband instru ments with longer a...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 3, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Anthony M. Tarescavage, Yossef S. Ben-Porath, Ryan J. Marek, Lana Boutacoff, Leslie J. Heinberg Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Factors Associated to Abnormal Distal Esophageal Exposure to Acid and Esophagitis in Individuals Seeking Bariatric Surgery
Obesity is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) [1], and esophageal acid exposure has been demonstrated to increase with the increase in body mass index (BMI) [2]. It has been demonstrated that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) provides for a greater rate of GERD remission compared to sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and that SG may lead to significant rates of de novo GERD [4,5]. Thus, before deciding between SG and RYGB, patients should have screening and an evaluation for the presence GERD. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 3, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Guilherme S. Mazzini, Carlos A. Madalosso, Guilherme M. Campos, Jad Khoraki, Fabio R. Bar ão, Daniel Navarini, Richard R. Gurski Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Mental disorders and weight change in a prospective study of bariatric surgery patients: 7 years of follow-up
Long-term, longitudinal data are limited on mental disorders after bariatric surgery. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Melissa A. Kalarchian, Wendy C. King, Michael J. Devlin, Amanda Hinerman, Marsha D. Marcus, Susan Z. Yanovski, James E. Mitchell Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Psychiatric Disorders and Weight Change in a Prospective Study of Bariatric Surgery Patients: 7 Years of Follow-up
Although bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity, resulting in long-term weight loss and improvements in obesity-related comorbid conditions[1-5] and health-related quality of life,[6-8] a substantial proportion of patients experience inadequate weight loss or significant weight regain.[9] Patterns of weight change vary by surgical procedure and among patients who have the same procedure.[10] Weight regain may be caused by operation-specific or patient-specific (mental health, health-related behaviors, endocrinopathies/metabolic) factors. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Melissa A. Kalarchian, Wendy C. King, Michael J. Devlin, Amanda Hinerman, Marsha D. Marcus, Susan Z. Yanovski, James E. Mitchell Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Superior mesenteric vein compression: a reliable sign of internal hernia after gastric bypass
Internal obstructions secondary to internal hernia (IH) are frequent (i.e. 0-16%) and dreaded mid-term (postoperative 12-24 month) complications after Roux-Y-gastric bypass (RYGB) [1]. The absence of closure of the mesenteric defects [1] combined with few adhesions formation after laparoscopy [2] and rapid visceral fat loss [3] participate to IH. Clinical presentation is characterized by unspecific and intermittent gastro-intestinal symptoms, responsible for delayed diagnosis [1]. The CT-scan features vary from a combination of unspecific vascular and digestive signs (Figure 1 A) to evidence of bowel ischemia [4]. (Source:...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: L Genser, PA Colas, C Barrat Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

SOARD Category 1 CME Credit Featured Articles, Volume 15, February 2019
Carmil Azran, Daniel Porat, Noa Fine-Shamir, Nirvana Hanhan, Arik Dahan (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - February 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Source Type: research

Single- or double-anastomosis duodenal switch versus Roux-en-Y gastric bypass as a revisional procedure for sleeve gastrectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Obesity is an epidemic affecting approximately 650 million people worldwide [1]. Additionally, the incidence of obesity has been increasing, with the global prevalence tripling since 1975 [1]. From an economic perspective, it is estimated that the United States spends nearly 21% of their healthcare budget ($190 billion/yr) managing obesity-related health complications [2]. Despite the increasing incidence and economic burden, there has been little progress in managing and preventing obesity with lifestyle modifications or pharmacologic interventions; this failure is even more pronounced in the super-obese population (body ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Yung Lee, Yosef Ellenbogen, Aristithes G. Doumouras, Scott Gmora, Mehran Anvari, Dennis Hong Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Perioperative blood transfusion increases risk of surgical site infection after bariatric surgery
Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM) hypothesizes that with the administration of blood transfusions, the host's immune surveillance mechanism is downregulated and therefore more predisposed to infection [1]. The theory is that white blood cells (WBCs) within the donated blood induce an immunosuppressive effect in the recipient. However, WBCs have not been the sole identified cause of this potential effect [2]. This is significant for patients undergoing surgery whose immune system is already suppressed, and they experience a complication that requires a blood transfusion. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Rana M. Higgins, Melissa C. Helm, Tammy L. Kindel, Jon C. Gould Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Evaluating the Safety of Bariatric Surgery for Weight Loss in Class I Obesity: A Propensity-Matched Analysis of North American data
More than half of the global population lives in countries with higher morbidity rates due to complications of obesity rather than as a result of being underweight [1,2]. Bariatric surgery is the most effective modality available for the treatment of Class II (BMI 35-40) and Class III obesity (BMI greater than 40) [3-5]. The two highest volume procedures offered in North America and around the world are laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) [6]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Gary Gamme, Jerry T. Dang, Noah Switzer, Richdeep Gill, Daniel W. Birch, Shahzeer Karmali Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

A Randomized Control Trial Using Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine during Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery to Reduce Postoperative Pain and Narcotic Use
Dexmedetomidine (DMET), a selective a2-adrenergic agonist, is an opioid sparing adjuvant sedative that avoids respiratory depression and has been shown to be beneficial in bariatric surgery patients. While benefit has been shown, prior studies have not evaluated the pain control effects of a single intra-operative bolus. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Pavithra Ranganathan, Michael K. Ritchie, Matthew B. Ellison, Ashley Petrone, Payam Heiraty, Lawrence E. Tabone Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

The impact of socioeconomic factors on the early postoperative complication rate after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery
Bariatric surgery offers a safe and effective treatment to the various metabolic and cardiovascular comorbid diseases of morbid obesity in patients with a Body Mass Index (BMI)>35 kg/m2 [1, 2]. Even if the risk for complication after surgery is low, the high number of procedures performed each year results in an overall complication rate that is substantial. Patients with lower socioeconomic status and low level of education are known to have an increased risk for complication after other surgical procedures [3, 4], may not attend follow-up visits [5], and may experience poorer outcome [6]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Erik Stenberg, Carina Persson, Erik N äslund, Johan Ottosson, Magnus Sundbom, Eva Szabo, Ingmar Näslund Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Changes of gut microbiota between different weight reduction programs
Gut microbiota may induce obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Different weight reduction programs may induce different changes in gut microbiota. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Belle Yanyu Lin, Wei- De Lin, Chih-Kun Huang, Ming-Che Hsin, Wen-Yuan Lin, Aurora D. Pryor Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Perioperative Blood Transfusion Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infection Following Bariatric Surgery
Transfusion-associated immunomodulation (TRIM) hypothesizes that with the administration of blood transfusions, the host's immune surveillance mechanism is downregulated, and therefore more predisposed to infection [1]. The theory is that white blood cells (WBCs) within the donated blood induce an immunosuppressive effect in the recipient. However, WBCs have not been the sole identified cause of this potential effect [2]. This is significant for patients undergoing surgery, where their immune system is already suppressed, and they experience a complication that requires a blood transfusion. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Rana M Higgins, Melissa C Helm, Tammy L Kindel, Jon C Gould Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Early glycemic control and incretin improvement after gastric bypass: the role of oral and gastrostomy route
Bariatric surgery is currently the best treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in patients with obesity. Although different surgical techniques produce different results, better glycemic control is achieved with surgical procedures compared to clinical treatments [1 –3]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Gustavo Fernandes, Marco Aurelio Santo, Andrea de F átima Crispino Bastos Crespo, Gabriel Barbosa Biancardi, Filippe Camarotto Motta, Leila Antonangelo, Roberto de Cleva Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Single or double anastomosis duodenal switch versus gastric bypass as a revisional procedure for sleeve gastrectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Obesity is an epidemic affecting approximately 650 million people worldwide [1]. Additionally, the incidence of obesity has been increasing with the global prevalence tripling since 1975 [1]. From an economic perspective, it is estimated that United States spends nearly 21% of the healthcare budget ($190 billion per year) managing obesity-related health complications) [2]. Despite the increasing incidence, as well as the economic burden, there has been little progress in managing and preventing obesity with lifestyle modifications and/or pharmacological interventions - this failure is even more pronounced in the super-obes...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Yung Lee, Yosef Ellenbogen, Aristithes G. Doumouras, Scott Gmora, Mehran Anvari, Dennis Hong Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Ten-year outcomes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy: an observational nonrandomized cohort study
Although sleeve gastrectomy (SG) was originally conceived as the gastric component of duodenal switch [1,2], in recent years this surgical technique has gained popularity as standalone bariatric surgery (BS) procedure. Indeed, SG has replaced RYGB as the most commonly performed BS procedure worldwide [3]. Notably, comparable weight loss (WL) at midterm (5 yr) after RYGB and SG was recently reported in 2 randomized clinical trials (RCT) [4,5]. That being said, RYGB was found superior to SG on lipid and blood pressure control in the above mentioned RCTs [4,5]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 29, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Amanda Jim énez, Ainitze Ibarzabal, Violeta Moizé, Adriana Pané, Alba Andreu, Judith Molero, Ana de Hollanda, Lilliam Flores, Emilio Ortega, Antonio Lacy, Josep Vidal Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Ten-year outcomes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy: An observational non-randomized cohort study
Although sleeve gastrectomy (SG) was originally conceived as the gastric component of duodenal switch [1,2], in recent years this surgical technique has gained popularity as standalone bariatric surgery (BS) procedure. Indeed, SG has replaced RYGB as the most commonly performed BS procedure worldwide [3]. Notably, comparable weight loss (WL) at mid-term (five years) after RYGB and SG was recently reported in two randomized clinical trials (RCT) [4,5]. That being said, RYGB was found superior to SG on lipid and blood pressure control in the above mentioned RCTs [4,5]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 29, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Amanda Jim énez, Ainitze Ibarzabal, Violeta Moizé, Adriana Pané, Alba Andreu, Judith Molero, Ana de Hollanda, Lilliam Flores, Emilio Ortega, Antonio Lacy, Josep Vidal Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Predictors and outcomes of leak after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: An analysis of the MBSAQIP data registry
Obesity is a complex chronic disease associated with metabolic dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality [1]. In 2016 alone, nearly 40% of adults worldwide aged 18 years and older were considered overweight [2]. Bariatric surgery is the only long-term treatment for severe obesity and its metabolic sequela [3]. With rising obesity rates, it is not surprising that the number of bariatric surgeries performed have increased dramatically over the last two decades [4,5]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 26, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Valentin Mocanu, Jerry Dang, Farah Ladak, Noah Switzer, Daniel W. Birch, Shahzeer Karmali Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Twin pregnancy outcomes after metabolic and bariatric surgery
Obesity is recognized as a global epidemic due to its constantly growing incidence [1]. Its worldwide prevalence has more than doubled in the last 2 decades, and currently entails 35% of the U.S. population [1]. The most effective treatment for morbid obesity has become bariatric surgery (BS); its efficacy in achieving significant weight loss and improving obesity-related co-morbidities has been well established [2]. In light of the high proportion of reproductive-aged women among BS patients, coupled with the rapidly increasing use of BS, obstetricians are increasingly likely to encounter women who have undergone BS in th...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Amihai Rottenstreich, Gabriel Levin, Misgav Rottenstreich, Yossef Ezra, Ram Elazary, Uriel Elchalal Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Laparoscopic loop duodenaljejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy in type 2 diabetic patients
Diabetes is an epidemic disease and is estimated to affect>300 million people worldwide in 2025 [1]. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) management is a combination of diet, lifestyle modifications, and drug therapy. Recently, many studies have shown remission of T2D in obese population [2 –6]. Buchwald et al. [2] in his systemic review and meta-analysis showed that diabetes remission rates were 99% (95% confidence interval, 97%–100%) after biliopancreatic diversion, 84% (95% confidence interval, 77%–90%) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and 48% (95% confidence interval, 2 9%–67%) after gastric banding. ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Zubaidah Nor Hanipah, Ming-Che Hsin, Chia-Chia Liu, Chih-Kun Huang Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Laparoscopic loop duodenaljejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy in type ii diabetic patients
Diabetes mellitus is an epidemic disease and is estimated to affect over 300 million people worldwide in 2025 [1]. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) management is a combination of diet, lifestyle modifications and drug therapy. Recently, many studies had shown remission of T2D in obese population [2-6]. Buchwald et al [2] in his systemic review and meta-analysis showed that diabetes remission rates were 99% (95% confidence interval (CI), 97-100%) after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), 84% (95% CI, 77-90%) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and 48% (95% CI, 29-67%) after gastric banding. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Zubaidah Nor Hanipah, Ming-Che Hsin, Chia-Chia Liu, Chih-Kun Huang Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Health and appearance: Factors motivating the decision to seek bariatric surgery
Bariatric surgery confers a multitude of benefits for health and quality of life among patients with obesity [1,2]. In addition to the medical conditions that may be eliminated or better managed as a result of surgery [3], patients report improvements in self-esteem and body image up to 4 years later [4]. However, few studies have explored the relative importance of health, appearance, and other potentially motivating factors in patients ’ decision to undergo bariatric surgery. Understanding the factors that may concurrently influence patient motivation for bariatric surgery is needed to inform preoperative counselin...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Rebecca L. Pearl, Thomas A. Wadden, Kaylah Walton, Kelly C. Allison, Jena Shaw Tronieri, Noel Williams Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Twin pregnancy outcomes following metabolic and bariatric surgery
Obesity is recognized as a global epidemic due to its constantly growing incidence.[1] Its worldwide prevalence has more than doubled in the last two decades, and currently entails 35% of the US population.[1] The most effective treatment for morbid obesity has become bariatric surgery (BS); its efficacy in achieving significant weight loss and improving obesity-related comorbidities has been well established.[2] In light of the high proportion of reproductive-aged women among BS patients, coupled with the rapidly increasing utilization of BS, obstetricians are increasingly likely to encounter women who have undergone BS i...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Amihai Rottenstreich, Gabriel Levin, Misgav Rottenstreich, Yossef Ezra, Ram Elazary, Uriel Elchalal Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Pet-ct reveals increased intestinal glucose uptake after gastric surgery
Bariatric surgery yields not only robust weight loss but also marked improvements in glucose metabolism [1-3], with reduced plasma glucose, remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and lowering of glucose to below-normal levels in a subset of individuals with post-bariatric hypoglycemia [4,5]. Potential mechanisms engaged by bariatric and other upper gastrointestinal surgical procedures include accelerated gastric emptying, alterations in bile acid metabolism and enterohepatic recirculation, changes in the intestinal microbiome [6], and increased incretin secretion (e.g. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Elisa Franquet, George Watts, Gerald M. Kolodny, Allison B. Goldfine, Mary-Elizabeth Patti Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Gait changes after weight loss on adolescent with severe obesity after Sleeve Gastrectomy
Obesity is an increasing phenomena in adolescent and preschool children [1]. This is consistent with numerous health-related comorbid conditions in teenagers mainly including dyslipidemia, sleep apnea, hypertension and joint and back pain [2]. It was also demonstrated that principally male adolescents between 18 and 19 years old with severe obesity [3] increase the relative risk of specific cardio-vascular disease risk factors. Previous authors described musculoskeletal pain and disorders [4-6], due to obesity, as risk factors in the development of knee osteoarthritis [7-9]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Susanna Summa, Francesco De Peppo, Maurizio Petrarca, Romina Caccamo, Riccardo Carbonetti, Enrico Castelli, Ottavio Domenico Adorisio Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Recent trends in intensive treatments of obesity: is academic research matching public interest?
Overweight/obesity continues to be a serious public health concern. World Health Organization estimated that the worldwide prevalence of obesity nearly tripled between 1975 and 2016, with 1.9 bilion adults are overweight in 2016, and of these 650 million were obese.[1] In addition to the pandemic escalation of obesity in developed nations, obesity is now on the rise in developing countries, such as China, India and the rest of Asia. The World Health Organization estimates that more than 1.7 billion people worldwide are overweight or obesel. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Zhixian Sui, Jayanthi Raman, Bo Han, Tim Burchell, Sean C.P. Coogan, Beatrice Brennan, Adrian Sartoretto Source Type: research