Laparoscopic loop duodenaljejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy in type ii diabetic patients
Diabetes mellitus is an epidemic disease and is estimated to affect over 300 million people worldwide in 2025 [1]. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) management is a combination of diet, lifestyle modifications and drug therapy. Recently, many studies had shown remission of T2D in obese population [2-6]. Buchwald et al [2] in his systemic review and meta-analysis showed that diabetes remission rates were 99% (95% confidence interval (CI), 97-100%) after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), 84% (95% CI, 77-90%) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and 48% (95% CI, 29-67%) after gastric banding. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Zubaidah Nor Hanipah, Ming-Che Hsin, Chia-Chia Liu, Chih-Kun Huang Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Health and appearance: Factors motivating the decision to seek bariatric surgery
Bariatric surgery confers a multitude of benefits for health and quality of life among patients with obesity [1,2]. In addition to the medical conditions that may be eliminated or better managed as a result of surgery [3], patients report improvements in self-esteem and body image up to 4 years later [4]. However, few studies have explored the relative importance of health, appearance, and other potentially motivating factors in patients ’ decision to undergo bariatric surgery. Understanding the factors that may concurrently influence patient motivation for bariatric surgery is needed to inform preoperative counselin...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Rebecca L. Pearl, Thomas A. Wadden, Kaylah Walton, Kelly C. Allison, Jena Shaw Tronieri, Noel Williams Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Twin pregnancy outcomes following metabolic and bariatric surgery
Obesity is recognized as a global epidemic due to its constantly growing incidence.[1] Its worldwide prevalence has more than doubled in the last two decades, and currently entails 35% of the US population.[1] The most effective treatment for morbid obesity has become bariatric surgery (BS); its efficacy in achieving significant weight loss and improving obesity-related comorbidities has been well established.[2] In light of the high proportion of reproductive-aged women among BS patients, coupled with the rapidly increasing utilization of BS, obstetricians are increasingly likely to encounter women who have undergone BS i...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Amihai Rottenstreich, Gabriel Levin, Misgav Rottenstreich, Yossef Ezra, Ram Elazary, Uriel Elchalal Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Pet-ct reveals increased intestinal glucose uptake after gastric surgery
Bariatric surgery yields not only robust weight loss but also marked improvements in glucose metabolism [1-3], with reduced plasma glucose, remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and lowering of glucose to below-normal levels in a subset of individuals with post-bariatric hypoglycemia [4,5]. Potential mechanisms engaged by bariatric and other upper gastrointestinal surgical procedures include accelerated gastric emptying, alterations in bile acid metabolism and enterohepatic recirculation, changes in the intestinal microbiome [6], and increased incretin secretion (e.g. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 25, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Elisa Franquet, George Watts, Gerald M. Kolodny, Allison B. Goldfine, Mary-Elizabeth Patti Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Gait changes after weight loss on adolescent with severe obesity after Sleeve Gastrectomy
Obesity is an increasing phenomena in adolescent and preschool children [1]. This is consistent with numerous health-related comorbid conditions in teenagers mainly including dyslipidemia, sleep apnea, hypertension and joint and back pain [2]. It was also demonstrated that principally male adolescents between 18 and 19 years old with severe obesity [3] increase the relative risk of specific cardio-vascular disease risk factors. Previous authors described musculoskeletal pain and disorders [4-6], due to obesity, as risk factors in the development of knee osteoarthritis [7-9]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Susanna Summa, Francesco De Peppo, Maurizio Petrarca, Romina Caccamo, Riccardo Carbonetti, Enrico Castelli, Ottavio Domenico Adorisio Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Recent trends in intensive treatments of obesity: is academic research matching public interest?
Overweight/obesity continues to be a serious public health concern. World Health Organization estimated that the worldwide prevalence of obesity nearly tripled between 1975 and 2016, with 1.9 bilion adults are overweight in 2016, and of these 650 million were obese.[1] In addition to the pandemic escalation of obesity in developed nations, obesity is now on the rise in developing countries, such as China, India and the rest of Asia. The World Health Organization estimates that more than 1.7 billion people worldwide are overweight or obesel. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Zhixian Sui, Jayanthi Raman, Bo Han, Tim Burchell, Sean C.P. Coogan, Beatrice Brennan, Adrian Sartoretto Source Type: research

The influence of staple height on postoperative complication rates after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery using linear staplers.
Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery is a safe and effective treatment for morbid obesity [1 –4] with a current worldwide figure of almost 200 000 procedures performed each year [5]. Postoperative complications, however, still occur and can result in serious morbidity for a number of patients [6]. Although some preoperative risk factors are known to be associated with increased risk for complication, intraoperative factors appear to be associated with the highest risk [1,7]. The staple height of the circular stapler used for gastroenterostomy has been reported to influence the risk for postoperative complication ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Emma Lundvall, Johan Ottosson, Erik Stenberg Tags: Original investigation Source Type: research

Duodenal switch: Fully stapled technique
Duodenal switch and single anastomosis modifications continue to gain greater interest among bariatric surgeons. Limiting factors to adoption include concerns around the nutritional management, patient compliance and follow-up, and the technical challenge of the operation. The majority of techniques offered currently use a hand-sewn duodenoileostomy. This approach is limited by the steep learning curve as well as longer operating times. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 22, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Peter C. Ng, Lindsey S. Sharp, Dustin M. Bermudez Tags: Video case report Source Type: research

“Duodenal Switch: Fully Stapled Technique.”
– (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 22, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Peter C. Ng, Lindsey S. Sharp, Dustin M. Bermudez Source Type: research

Patient preferences or surgeon-enforced preferences, when deciding between Roux-en-Y gastric bypass versus sleeve gastrectomy
I was intrigued by the report from Kallies et al. [1] on “Roux-en-Y gastric bypass versus sleeve gastrectomy: what factors influence patient preference?” and asked myself the question if surgeons preferences were in fact the driver when presenting evidenced-based facts to patients helping them making a wise decision about their future procedure. Perha ps also, because sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or laparoscopic SG (LSG) has risen in popularity and patients coming to bariatric surgery offices are requesting this procedure more and more, it may, in fact, be in collusion with surgical preferences of certain bariatric ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 15, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Michel Gagner Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Patient Preferences or Surgeons enforced preferences, when deciding between Roux-en-Y gastric bypass versus sleeve gastrectomy.
Dear Colleagues, I was intrigued by the report from Kallies KJ et al. on “Roux-en-Y gastric bypass versus sleeve gastrectomy: what factors influence patient preference?” and asked myself the question if surgeons preferences were in fact the driver, when presenting evidenced based facts to patients, helping them making a wise decision about their future procedure [1]. Perhaps also, because sleeve gastrectomy (SG) (LSG) has risen in popularity and patients coming to bariatric surgery offices are requesting more and more this procedure, it may in fact, be in collision with surgical preferences of certain bariatric...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 15, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Michel Gagner Source Type: research

Comment on: factors associated with bariatric surgery utilization among eligible candidates: who drops out?
I read with interest the recent article written by Alvarez et al. [1]. The authors conducted a retrospective study at a university hospital to determine factors associated with dropout among patients who were eligible for bariatric surgery. The authors concluded that dropout was independently associated with certain co-morbidities, including hypertension and coronary artery disease, type of insurance, and program-specific requirements, including medical clearance and a psychological evaluation. Although this study addressed an important issue among potential bariatric surgery patients, I have some questions and concerns ab...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Anawin Sanguankeo Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comment on: gastric bypass specifically impairs liver parameters as compared with sleeve gastrectomy, independently of evolution of metabolic disorders
I read with great interest the article written by Ledoux et al. [1]. The authors conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG). They assessed the difference in metabolic parameters, liver enzymes, and abdominal ultrasonography between the 2 surgery types. The most interesting finding was the higher level of transaminases after RYGB compared with SG, and the same degree of persistent steatosis on ultrasonography between procedures. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Anawin Sanguankeo Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comment on long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years: a systematic review
The systematic review entitled “Long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years: a systematic review” [1] in Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases is a timely publication addressing the obesity epidemic in a growing population of patients. Childh ood obesity has increased exponentially all over the world and has put adolescents at an increased risk for developing adult co-morbidities. Family-based lifestyle modification is a crucial step in weight management but bariatric surgery is the most effective measure for weight loss and im...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Saeed Shoar, Nasrin Shoar, Mohammad Naderan, Venkat R. Modukuru, Habibollah Mahmoodzadeh Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Response to the letter to the editor: long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years: a systematic review
We have read with interest the comments of Shoar et al. regarding our systematic review on long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Arturo Jim énez-Cruz Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Comment on “Long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years: A systematic review”
The systematic review entitled “Long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years: A systematic review” in SOARD is a timely publication addressing the obesity epidemic in a growing population of patients [1]. Childhood obesity has increased exponenti ally all over the world and has put adolescents at an increased risk for developing adult comorbidities. Family-based lifestyle modification is a crucial step in weight management but bariatric surgery is the most effective measure for weight loss and improvement of comorbidities [2]. (Sou...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Saeed Shoar, Nasrin Shoar, Mohammad Naderan, Venkat R. Modukuru, Habibollah Mahmoodzadeh Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Response to the letter to the Editor: “Long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years: A systematic review”
We have read with interest Dr. Shoar's comments regarding our systematic review on long-term outcomes of metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity with a follow-up of at least 5 years. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Arturo Jime ́nez-Cruz, Patricia Ruiz-Cota, Monserrat Bacardí-Gascón Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comment on: “Gastric bypass specifically impairs liver parameters as compared with sleeve gastrectomy, independently of evolution of metabolic disorders”
I read with great interest an article written by Ledoux, et al. [1]. The authors conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG). They assessed the difference in metabolic parameters, liver enzymes, and abdominal ultrasonography between the two surgery types. The most interesting finding was the higher level of transaminases after RYGB compared to SG, and the same degree of persistent steatosis on ultrasonography between procedures. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Anawin Sanguankeo Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comment on: “Factors associated with bariatric surgery utilization among eligible candidates: who drops out?”
I read with interest a recent article written by Alvarez, et al [1]. The authors conducted a retrospective study at a university hospital to determine factors associated with dropout among patients who were eligible for bariatric surgery. The authors concluded that dropout was independently associated with certain comorbidities, including hypertension and coronary artery disease; type of insurance; and program-specific requirements, including medical clearance and a psychological evaluation. Although this study addressed an important issue among potential bariatric surgery patients, I have some questions and concerns about...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Anawin Sanguankeo Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Rates of reoperation and nonoperative intervention within 30 days of bariatric surgery
Complications arising from Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) are not insignificant and can necessitate additional invasive interventions or reoperations. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Farah Ladak, Jerry T. Dang, Noah Switzer, Valentin Mocanu, Daniel Birch, Shahzeer Karmali Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Incidentally discovered intestinal nonrotation at time of bariatric surgery: Which operation to perform?
In Canada, 5% of patients are classified as being class II (body mass index [BMI] 35 –39.9) or class III (BMI ≥40) obese. More than 6500 bariatric surgeries were performed in Canada between 2013 and 2014, which represents a 4-fold increase over 7 years. Eighty-five percent of these procedures are either laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) [1 ]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Gary Ko, Andrew Smith, Scott Cassie, Boris Zevin Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Conception rates and contraceptive use after bariatric surgery among women with infertility: Evidence from a prospective multicenter cohort  study
Obesity has an inverse association with female reproductive potential that includes increased time to conception [1], increased lifetime odds of nulliparity [2,3], and decreased efficacy of treatment options for infertility [4]. For patients with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥40 or 35 to (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Marie N. Menke, Wendy C. King, Gretchen E. White, Gabriella G. Gosman, Anita P. Courcoulas, Gregory F. Dakin, David R. Flum, Molly J. Orcutt, Alfons Pomp, Walter J. Pories, Jonathan Q. Purnell, Kristine J. Steffen, Bruce M. Wolfe, Susan Z. Yanovski Tags: Original article Source Type: research

“Double cut technique” for endoscopic removal of eroded adjustable gastric band without previous surgical extraction of port and connection tube
Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is a common procedure for morbid obesity [1]. However, it is associated with several adverse events related to band implantation, namely band slippage, esophageal dilation, band infection, and band erosion [2]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Gianfranco Donatelli, Fabrizio Cereatti Tags: Video case report Source Type: research

Rates of Reoperation and Non-operative Intervention Within 30 Days of Bariatric Surgery
Bariatric surgery has dramatically changed the therapeutic landscape of obesity management and is now considered the most efficacious option for sustained weight loss and treatment of obesity-related medical diseases [1,2]. In North America, over 228,000 procedures were performed in 2017 alone [3,4]. Given pandemic rates of obesity and the relative futility of currently available medical therapies, demand is only expected to increase. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Farah Ladak, Jerry T. Dang, Noah Switzer, Valentin Mocanu, Daniel Birch, University of Alberta Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Incidentally discovered intestinal non-rotation at time of bariatric surgery: which operation to perform?
In Canada, 5% of patients are classified as being class II (Body Mass Index [BMI] 35 to 39.9) or class III (BMI ≥ 40) obese. More than 6,500 bariatric surgeries were performed in Canada between 2013-2014, which represents a four-fold increase over seven years. Eighty-five percent of these procedures are either laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) [1]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Gary Ko, Andrew Smith, Scott Cassie, Boris Zevin Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Conception Rates and Contraceptive Use Following Bariatric Surgery Among Women with Infertility: Evidence from a Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study
Obesity has an inverse association with female reproductive potential that includes increased time to conception [1], increased lifetime odds of nulliparity [2,3], and decreased efficacy of treatment options for infertility [4]. For patients with severe obesity (body mass index, BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 or 35 to (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Marie N. Menke, Wendy C. King, Gretchen E. White, Gabriella G. Gosman, Anita P. Courcoulas, Gregory F. Dakin, David R. Flum, Molly J. Orcutt, Alfons Pomp, Walter J. Pories, Jonathan Q. Purnell, Kristine J. Steffen, Bruce M. Wolfe, Susan Z. Yanovski Source Type: research

« Double cut technique » for endoscopic removal of eroded adjustable gastric band without previous surgical extraction of port and connection tube
Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is a common procedure for morbid obesity. [1] However it is associated to several adverse events related to band implantation namely band slippage, esophageal dilation, band infection and band erosion [2]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Gianfranco DONATELLI, Fabrizio CEREATTI Source Type: research

Discussion of: opioids and bariatric surgery: a review and suggested recommendations for assessment and risk reduction
Individuals with extreme obesity who present for bariatric surgery often do so with a significant physical and psychosocial burden. Many report physical pain that impacts their functioning and quality of life [1]. Others suffer with significant mental health issues that may have contributed to or been exacerbated by their obesity and related co-morbidities [2]. Rates of psychopathology among candidates for bariatric surgery are higher than seen in the general population [3]. While much of the early work in this area focused on mood and anxiety disorders, several studies in the past several years have found higher rates of ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 10, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: David B. Sarwer Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Discussion of “Opioids and Bariatric Surgery: A Review and Suggested Recommendations for Assessment and Risk Reduction”
Individuals with extreme obesity who present for bariatric surgery often do so with a significant physical and psychosocial burden. Many report physical pain that impacts their functioning and quality of life [1]. Others suffer with significant mental health issues that may have contributed to and/or been exacerbated by their obesity and related comborbidites [2]. Rates of psychopathology among candidates for bariatric surgery are higher than seen in the general population [3]. While much of the early work in this area focused on mood and anxiety disorders, several studies in the past several years have found higher rates ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 10, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Dr. David B. Sarwer Source Type: research

Protein deficiency after gastric bypass: the role of common limb length in revision surgery
Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for patients with morbid obesity and results in sustained weight loss [1,2]. However, the numbers of non-responders to surgical treatment and late complications have also increased with the growing number of bariatric procedures and the increase in follow-up duration [3]. Among various bariatric procedures, gastric bypass is one of the commonly performed mal-absorptive procedures, with sustained long-term weight loss and a high rate of resolution of co-morbidities [1 –4]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 10, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Jung-Chien Chen, Chen-Yang Shen, Wei-Jei Lee, Pei-Ling Tsai, Yi-Chih Lee Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Factors influencing long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery
Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment option to fight the increasing obesity epidemic and associated co-morbid conditions [1,2]. However, up to 15% of patients undergoing bariatric surgery may not achieve successful weight loss>50% excess weight [3,4]. Furthermore, maximal weight loss is observed at 1 to 2 years after surgery with weight regain after this initial postsurgical period [5]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: William W. Chang, Devon Hawkins, Joel Brockmeyer, Byron Faler, Samuel Hoppe, Balakrishna Prasad Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Long-term micronutrient surveillance after gastric bypass surgery in an integrated healthcare system
The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the United States is growing. While gastric bypass surgery is an important tool in the management of obesity, it requires lifelong metabolic monitoring and medical management. Data describing compliance with recommended laboratory follow-up are limited, particularly in long-term and primary care settings. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Wesley Fox, Andrew Borgert, Cary Rasmussen, Kara Kallies, Paul Klas, Shanu Kothari Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Oral levothyroxine therapy postbariatric surgery: Biopharmaceutical aspects and clinical effects
Bariatric surgery can lead to changes in the oral absorption of many drugs. Levothyroxine is a narrow therapeutic drug for hypothyroidism, a common condition among patients with severe obesity. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Carmil Azran, Daniel Porat, Noa Fine-Shamir, Nirvana Hanhan, Arik Dahan Tags: Controversies in Bariatric Surgery Source Type: research

Discussion of: the relationship between childhood maltreatment and psychopathology in adults undergoing bariatric surgery
Childhood maltreatment, which includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse as well as neglect, is a significant, worldwide public health issue. Childhood maltreatment can profoundly affect child development. A single incident of abuse or the cumulative effects of chronic neglect can reverberate into and throughout adulthood, potentially increasing risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, pulmonary disease, and tobacco and alcohol use [1]. The association between childhood maltreatment and psychopathology are well established [2]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: David B. Sarwer, Krista Schroeder Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Quality of life and predictive factors for complications in patients undergoing abdominoplasty after gastric bypass – a retrospective cohort
Obesity is a major health risk factor associated with medical complications, such as cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer, degenerative arthritis, and sleep apnea. Furthermore, obesity may lead to difficulties in daily life (e.g., clothing, walking, sexual activity, hygiene problems), altering the quality of life and generating psychological disorders such as devalued self-image and depression [1,2]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Simone Corr êa Rosa, Jefferson Lessa Soares de Macedo, Lucas Ribeiro Canedo, Luiz Augusto Casulari Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Impact of prior bariatric surgery on outcomes of hospitalized patients with heart failure: A population-based study
Obesity has increased substantially in prevalence recently to become one of the major health burden around the world [1]. In the United States, almost 34.9% of adults and 16.9% of youth are obese [2]. Morbid obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥40 kg/m2, is reported to be associated with lower quality of life and higher health-care costs. It is also well-established as a risk factor for illness including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal disease and cancer [3]. Generally, life-style intervention, physical activity, anti -obesity drugs and bariatric surgery (BS) are main preventive and treatment ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Hedong Han, Tiantian Zhu, Yibin Guo, Yiming Ruan, Eyal Herzog, Jia He Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Factors Influencing Long Term Weight Loss after Bariatric Surgery
Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment option to fight the increasing obesity epidemic and associated comorbid conditions[1,2]. However, up to 15% of patients undergoing bariatric surgery may not achieve successful weight loss of greater than 50% excess body weight [3,4]. Furthermore, maximal weight loss is observed at 1-2 years after surgery with weight regain after this initial post-surgical period [5]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: William W. Chang, Devon Hawkins, Joel Brockmeyer, Byron Faler, Samuel Hoppe, Balakrishna Prasad Fort Gordon Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Long-term micronutrient surveillance after gastric bypass surgery in an integrated health care system
The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the United States is growing. While gastric bypass surgery is an important tool in the management of obesity, it requires lifelong metabolic monitoring and medical management. Data describing compliance with recommended laboratory follow up is limited, particularly in long-term and primary care settings. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Wesley Fox, Andrew Borgert, Cary Rasmussen, Kara Kallies, Paul Klas, Shanu Kothari Source Type: research

Development of a Bariatric Surgery Specific Risk Assessment Tool for Perioperative Myocardial Infarction
The number of bariatric surgeries performed in the United States exceeded 225,000 in 2017 [1]. Morbidity and mortality after bariatric surgery has been low since the emergence of laparoscopy with reports that laparoscopic bariatric surgery is safer than common general surgery procedures such as laparoscopic cholecystectomy [2,3]. The low morbidity and mortality despite a preponderance of obesity-related surgical risk factors highlights the distinctiveness of bariatric surgery patients. As data continue to emerge about the long-term benefits of bariatric surgery, efforts continue to be targeted at risk optimization of patie...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Amlish Bilal Gondal, Chiu-Hsieh Hsu, Rostam Khoubyari, Iman Ghaderi Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Discussion of “The Relationship between Childhood Maltreatment and Psychopathology in Adults Undergoing Bariatric Surgery”
Childhood maltreatment, which includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse as well as neglect, is a significant, worldwide public health issue. Childhood maltreatment can profoundly affect child development. A single incident of abuse or the cumulative effects of chronic neglect can reverberate into and throughout adulthood, potentially increasing risk for cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, cancer, pulmonary disease, tobacco and alcohol use [1]. The association between childhood maltreatment and psychopathology are well established [2]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: David B. Sarwer, Krista Schroeder Source Type: research

Oral Levothyroxine Therapy Post Bariatric Surgery: Biopharmaceutical Aspects and Clinical Effects
Bariatric  surgery can lead to changes in the oral absorption of many drugs. Levothyroxine is a narrow therapeutic drug for hypothyroidism, a common condition among patients with severe obesity. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Carmil Azran, Daniel Porat, Noa Fine-Shamir, Nirvana Hanhan, Arik Dahan Tags: Controversies in Bariatric Surgery Source Type: research

Preventive effect of bariatric surgery on type 2 diabetes onset in morbidly obese inpatients: a national French survey between 2008 and 2016 on 328 509 morbidly obese
Recently, bariatric surgery (BS) has been shown to be effective against type 2 diabetes (T2D) in patients with obesity, improving glycemic control, quality of life, and reducing cardiovascular risk, compared to patients not undergoing BS[1,2]. In recent years a sharp increase in the number of bariatric procedures has been observed worldwide.[3] The most commonly performed bariatric procedures in France and in other countries are the adjustable gastric band (AGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG), which are both considered restrictive procedures, and the gastric bypass (GB). (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 7, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Laurent Bailly, Luigi Schiavo, Anne-Sophie Schneck, Lionel Sebastianelli, Roxane Fabre, Adeline Morisot, Christian Pradier, Antonio Iannelli Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

SOARD Category 1 CME Credit Featured Articles, Volume 15, January 2019
Luis F. Zorrilla-Nunez, Anthony Campbell, Giulio Giambartolomei, Emanuele Lo Menzo, Samuel Szomstein, Raul J. Rosenthal (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Source Type: research

Publisher ’s Note
In late 2018, the November issue of SOARD (14/11) was published with the incorrect start page number: 1643 instead of 1661. As a result, three articles in the November issue share overlapping page numbers with two articles published in the October issue (14/10). (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - January 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Reply
We thank Rottenstreich et al. for their interest in our paper [1] and emphasize that studies on the impact of sleeve gastrectomy on fetal growth are of utmost importance. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 28, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Muriel Coupaye, S éverine Ledoux Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Response Letter
We thank A. Rottenstreich et al. for their interest in our paper [1] and to emphasize that studies on the impact of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on fetal growth are utmost importance. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 28, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Muriel Coupaye, S éverine Ledoux Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

An Ounce of Bariatric Surgery is Worth a Pound of Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common and yet complex cardiac condition that can result in devastating complications including death [1]. Treating AF is equally complex and may involve the use of anticoagulation, electrical cardioversion, radiofrequency ablation and even cardiac surgery [2]. Such treatments also confer risk, which can result in additional patient suffering as well as a significant burden to health care resources [3]. As such, preventative measures for AF can be extremely beneficial. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 25, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Oliver A. Varban Source Type: research

DiaRem2: Incorporating duration of diabetes to improve prediction of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery
The DiaRem score was designed to provide a simple, preoperative tool for predicting the likelihood of type 2 diabetes (T2D) remission after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery [1]. The original version of DiaRem (hereafter referred to as DiaRem) used components that are usually known to patients with T2D and their providers, including age, hemoglobin A1C level (HbA1C), and types of T2D medications, compared with other prediction tools, DiaRem is easy to use, has the lowest prediction error [2] and it has been validated in multiple and varied RYGB cohorts [3 –7]. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - December 22, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Christopher D. Still, Peter Benotti, Tooraj Mirshahi, Adam Cook, G. Craig Wood Tags: Original article Source Type: research