]Liver transplantation for bariatric surgery-related liver failure: A systematic review of a rare condition
Protein malnutrition and bacterial overgrowth occurring after bariatric surgery (BS) might cause severe liver failure (LF) needing liver transplantation (LT). (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Pietro Addeo, Manuela Cesaretti, Rodolphe Anty, Antonio Iannelli Tags: Review articles Source Type: research

Clinical outcome of patients undergoing abdominoplasty after massive weight loss
Abdominoplasty is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in patients who have undergone massive weight loss to reshape the body contour. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Pauline Hunecke, Marianne Toll, Oliver Mann, Jakob Robert Izbicki, Marco Blessmann, Katharina Grupp Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Severe Obesity and Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment Options before the Bariatric Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Obesity is an epidemic issue worldwide which has various complications and comorbidities. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is a well-known metabolic disorder among patients with severe obesity. While they are good candidates for bariatric surgery, this deficiency can affect the outcomes of surgery negatively. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 11, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Masoud Sayadi Shahraki, Noushin Khalili, Shadi Yousefvand, Erfan Sheikhbahaei, Shahab Shahabi Shahmiri Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Letter to the editor on: Survival benefit in bariatric surgery kidney recipients may be mediated through effects on kidney graft function and improvement of co-morbidities: a case-control study
We read with interest the study by Schindel and colleague in the recent issue of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases [1]. The authors found that bariatric surgery was associated with a survival advantage in kidney recipients, and also report that bariatric intervention was correlated with improvements in graft function and co-morbidities. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 10, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Nicholas L. Syn, Ian J.Y. Wee Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Longitudinal changes of microbiome composition and microbial metabolomics after surgical weight loss in individuals with obesity.
Some of the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery may be mediated by the gut microbiome. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 10, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Nan Shen, Assumpta Caix às, Michael Ahlers, Kapila Patel, Zhan Gao, Roxanne Dutia, Martin J. Blaser, Jose C. Clemente, Blandine Laferrère Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Comment on: Banded versus nonbanded sleeve gastrectomy: 5-year results of a matched-pair analysis
I read with interest the manuscript entitled “Banded versus nonbanded sleeve gastrectomy: 5-year results of a matched-pair analysis” from a reputed university hospital in Germany [1]. The obvious weakness of this paper is that it is retrospective and nonrandomized. We have seen this problem in banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), where enthusiastic results were first put into print in retrospective series, to realize that in randomized studies there was not much difference. Is that story going to repeat itself? A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of studies looking at banded versus nonbanded gastric...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 7, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Michel Gagner Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

To band or not to band: is that the question or the answer for sleeve gastrectomy?
I read with interest the manuscript entitled “Banded versus nonbanded sleeve gastrectomy: 5-year results of a matched-pair analysis” from a reputed university hospital in Germany [1]. The obvious weakness of this paper is that it is retrospective and nonrandomized. We have seen this problem in banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), where enthusiastic results were first put into print in retrospective series, to realize that in randomized studies there was not much difference. Is that story going to repeat itself? A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of studies looking at banded versus nonbanded gastric...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 7, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Michel Gagner Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

To band or not to band, is that the question... or the answer for sleeve gastrectomy?
I read with interest the manuscript entitled " Banded versus non-banded sleeve gastrectomy: 5-year results of a matched-pair analysis" from a reputed University hospital in Germany.1 The obvious weakness of this paper is that it is retrospective and non-randomized. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 7, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Michel Gagner Source Type: research

Metabolic outcomes after bariatric surgery for indigenous patients in  Ontario
In 2013, 18% of Canadian adults had obesity (body mass index [BMI]>30 kg/m2), compared with 25.7% of Canada's indigenous population. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity, but has not been studied in Canadian indigenous populations. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Olivia Lovrics, Aristithes G. Doumouras, Scott Gmora, Mehran Anvari, Dennis Hong Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Vitamin K –what is known regarding bariatric surgery patients: a systematic review
Vitamin K, a fat-soluble vitamin, is involved in blood coagulation, bone mineralization, inhibition of vascular calcification, and regulation of numerous enzyme systems. Patients who undergo bariatric surgery (BS), especially procedures that involve a malabsorptive component, are prone to develop vitamin K deficiency (VKD). The causes of VKD include decreased absorptive surface areas, steatorrhea, bacterial overgrowth, marked reduction of carriers of vitamin K, decrease in vitamin K intake, and modifications of gut microbiota. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Shiri Sherf-Dagan, Ariela Goldenshluger, Carmil Azran, Nasser Sakran, Tali Sinai, Tair Ben-Porat Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Response letter to the editor
After reading the Abu Dayyeh et  al. letter regarding the paper “Endoscopic gastroplasty to treat medically uncontrolled obesity needs more quality data,” [1] I am not surprised that most of the co-authors coincide with the same group that, without any robust evidence, is trying to endorse endoscopic gastroplasty as a valid o ption to treat obesity. After all, it needs not only more quality data, but also any persuasive level 1A evidence for the intervention to be considered. Moreover, novel device-based procedures have been explicitly developed to treat obesity and its co-morbidities. (Source: Surgery for...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Ricardo Cohen, Marcus Vinicius da Costa Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Vitamin K- what is known regarding bariatric surgery patients: A systematic review
Vitamin K, a fat-soluble vitamin, is involved in blood coagulation, bone mineralization, inhibition of vascular calcification and regulation of numerous enzyme systems. Patients who undergo bariatric surgery (BS), especially procedures that involve a malabsorptive component, are prone to develop vitamin K deficiency (VKD). The causes of VKD include decreased absorptive surface areas, steatorrhea, bacterial overgrowth, marked reduction of carriers of vitamin K, decrease in vitamin K intake and modifications of gut microbiota. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Shiri Sherf-Dagan, Ariela Goldenshluger, Carmil Azran, Nasser Sakran, Tali Sinai, Tair Ben-Porat Tags: Review articles Source Type: research

Response Letter to the Editors
After reading Prof. Abu Dayyeh and colleagues letter regarding the paper "Endoscopic Gastroplasty to Treat Medically Uncontrolled Obesity Needs More Quality Data",(1) I'm not surprised that most of the flaming co-authors coincide with the same group that, without any robust evidence, is trying to bring endoscopic gastroplasty as a valid option to treat obesity. After all, it needs not only more quality data: it needs any persuasive level 1A evidence to make the intervention to start being considered. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Ricardo Cohen, Marcus Vinicius da Costa Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Metabolic outcomes after bariatric surgery for Indigenous patients in Ontario
In 2013, 18% of Canadian adults had obesity (body mass index (BMI)>30kg/m2), compared to 25.7% of Canada's Indigenous population. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity, but has not been studied in Canadian Indigenous populations. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 4, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Olivia Lovrics, Aristithes G. Doumouras, Scott Gmora, Mehran Anvari, Dennis Hong Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Bariatric surgery before and after kidney transplantation: long-term  weight loss and allograft outcomes
Severe obesity is frequently a barrier to kidney transplantation, and kidney transplant recipients often have significant weight gain following transplantation. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Jordana B. Cohen, Mary Ann Lim, Colleen M. Tewksbury, Samuel Torres-Landa, Jennifer Trofe-Clark, Peter L. Abt, Noel N. Williams, Kristoffel R. Dumon, Simin Goral Tags: Original article: integrated health Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

SOARD Category 1 CME Credit Featured Articles, Volume 15, June 2019
Brittney Hacken, Ann Rogers, Vernon Chinchilli, Matthew Silvis, Timothy Mosher, Kevin Black (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: Continuing medical education program Source Type: research

Cartoon
(Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - June 1, 2019 Category: Surgery Source Type: research

Comment on: Outcomes of Endoscopic Treatment of Leaks and Fistulae Following Sleeve Gastrectomy: Results From a Large Multicenter U.S. Cohort
In this issue, Smith et al.1 present results from a multicenter cohort of endoscopic treatment of leaks after sleeve gastrectomy, with significant emphasis on the use of stents. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 31, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Federico J. Serrot, Edward Lin Source Type: research

Comment on: Unacylated ghrelin is correlated with the decline of bone mineral density after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in obese Chinese with type 2 diabetes
This study sheds new light on the complex changes in bone metabolism and, ultimately, bone density after metabolic surgery. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 30, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Adrian T. Billeter, Beat P. M üller-Stich Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Comment on: GLP-1 and PYY3-36 reduce high-fat food preference additively after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in diet-induced obese rats
While many studies over the past several years have begun to unravel the mechanisms behind the ability for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) to elicit weight loss and metabolic improvement, it is yet unclear which aspects of the surgery lead to its therapeutic superiority to traditional lifestyle intervention (i.e., diet and exercise). While it is now accepted that gastric restriction is not a primary mechanism for RYGB ’s effects on weight loss and ingestive behavior1-3, it is important to understand the contribution of dietary composition and changes in macronutrient preference to the beneficial outcomes of t...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 30, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Margaret Stefater Source Type: research

Comment on: “Unacylated Ghrelin is Correlated with the Decline of Bone Mineral Density after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass in Obese Chinese with Type 2 Diabetes”
This study sheds new light on the complex changes in bone metabolism and ultimately bone density after metabolic surgery. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 30, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Adrian T. Billeter, Beat P. M üller-Stich Source Type: research

Comment on: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as day-case ambulatory surgery
I read with interest the manuscript entitled "Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as day-case ambulatory surgery", more so since I am the owner of such an ambulatory surgical centre in a major urban area in Canada.1 My main concern for patients is similar to when laparoscopic cholecystectomy went from less than 24 hours stay (the next day) to discharge the same day. What if bleeding occurs at home, how would the patient and family react, and would they survive a haemorrhagic shock episode? The possible liability that follows, and negative publicity, as it may make the main headlines in your local area. (Source: Surge...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 30, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Michel Gagner Source Type: research

Comment on: Gastric Leak After laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: Management with Endoscopic Double Pigtail Drainage. A Systematic Review
I read with interest the article entitled "Gastric Leak after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: Management with endoscopic Double Pigtail Drainage. A Systematic Review".1 The pooled data has given a successful closure rate of 85%, a high success rate when compared with other more aggressive, and expensive modalities such as self-expanding covered metal stents. Indeed 385 patients treated is a large number, in this most popular operation for weight loss and metabolic surgery. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 30, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Michel Gagner Source Type: research

Alterations of DNA methylation profile in proximal jejunum potentially contribute to the beneficial effects of gastric bypass in a diabetic rat model
The foregut theory posits that proximal small intestine plays an important role in the improvement of type 2 diabetes (T2D) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 29, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Haijun Liu, Hong Zhang, Xiao Wang, Xuemei Yu, Cheng Hu, Xueli Zhang Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Conversion from Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) and Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) to Mini/One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass (MGB/OAGB): preliminary data from a multicenter retrospective study.
Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure, while Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) has been for a decade one of the most popular interventions for weight loss. After LSG and LAGB, some patients may require a second surgery due to weight regain or late complications. One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass (OAGB) is a promising bariatric procedure which provides effective long-term weight loss and it has a favourable effect on T2DM. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 29, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Mario Musella, Vincenzo Bruni, Francesco Greco, Marco Raffaelli, Marcello Lucchese, Antonio Susa, Maurizio De Luca, Giuseppe Vuolo, Emilio Manno, Antonio Vitiello, Nunzio Velotti, Rossella D ’alessio, Enrico Facchiano, Andrea Tirone, Giuseppe Iovino, Ve Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Reversal of Roux en Y gastric bypass: largest single institution experience
We present the largest single institution experience with reversal of RYGB for serious chronic complications. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 28, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Pearl Ma, Saber Ghiassi, Aaron Lloyd, Ashraf Haddad, Keith Boone, Eric DeMaria, Kelvin Higa Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Endoscopic Gastroplasty Letter: ASGE/ABE
We read with interest the article by Cohen et  al. [1] on a systematic review on endoscopic gastroplasty (EG) for the treatment of obesity. The authors attempted to summarize and synthesize the current data on this relatively novel endoscopic bariatric procedure, which is being performed increasingly worldwide. While the topic is of interest t o a broad audience, there are several concerns regarding the methodology and accuracy of the data. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Steven A. Edmundowicz, Christopher C. Thompson Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Comparison of one-anastomosis gastric bypass and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for treatment of obesity: a 5-year study
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the gold standard in bariatric surgery. One-anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) has been reported to have equivalent or better weight loss, with added advantages of being technically easy, amenable to reintervention/reversal, and offering better food tolerance. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Mohit Bhandari, Hemant Kumar Nautiyal, Susmit Kosta, Winni Mathur, Mathias Fobi Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Banded versus nonbanded sleeve gastrectomy: 5-year results of a matched-pair analysis
Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) achieves excellent weight loss, yet recent reports indicate weight regain in a substantial number of patients. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Jodok M. Fink, Anais von Pigenot, Gabriel Seifert, Claudia Laessle, Stefan Fichtner-Feigl, Goran Marjanovic Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Letter to the Editors
We read with interest the article by Cohen et al [1] on a systematic review on endoscopic gastroplasty (EG) for the treatment of obesity. The authors attempted to summarize and synthesize the current data on this relatively novel endoscopic bariatric procedure, which is being performed increasingly worldwide. While the topic is of interest to a broad audience, there are several concerns regarding the methodology and accuracy of the data. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Steven A. Edmundowicz, Christopher C. Thompson Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Banded versus non-banded sleeve gastrectomy: 5-year results of a matched-pair analysis
Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) achieves excellent weight loss, yet recent reports indicate weight regain in a substantial number of patients. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Jodok M. Fink, Anais von Pigenot, Gabriel Seifert, Claudia Laessle, Stefan Fichtner-Feigl, Goran Marjanovic Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Comparison of One anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) for Treatment of Obesity: A Five-Year Study
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the gold standard in bariatric surgery. One anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) has been reported to have equivalent or better weight loss with added advantage of technically being easy, amenable to re-intervention/reversal and better food tolerance. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 24, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Mohit Bhandari, Hemant Kumar Nautiyal, Susmit Kosta, Winni Mathur, Mathias Fobi Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Comment on: Operative time as a marker of quality in bariatric surgery
Does operative time (OT) matter and should it serve as a quality metric? Does shorter OT indicate superior and efficient surgical skills, or does it contribute to less attention to detail and more mistakes? Does longer OT suggest a safe and considered approach, or inefficiency, poor skills, and inexperience? OT results from the amalgamation of surgical skill, patient factors, case complexity, surgical trainee involvement, surgical team, equipment, and infrastructure. It is difficult to determine the exact magnitude of contribution of each factor to OT, but it is intuitive that a surgeon ’s technical skill has great i...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 21, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Saber Ghiassi Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research

Protein deficiency after gastric bypass: the role of common limb length in revision surgery
Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for morbid obesity resulting in significant weight loss and resolution or improvement in co-morbid conditions. Nevertheless, short-term and long-term complications may arise postoperatively depending on the type of bariatric procedure and the duration of follow-up. Presently, several bariatric surgical techniques are available and the restrictive-malabsorptive surgical technique of gastric bypass is one of the most widely performed bariatric procedures. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 21, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Radwan Kassir, Marco Nunziante, Farouk Dargai Source Type: research

Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty is Safe and Effective: Pitfalls of a Flawed Systematic Review
We read the systematic review published in the journal by Cohen et al1. regarding the efficacy and safety of endoscopic gastroplasty for uncontrolled obesity. At first glance, we are flattered that a major medical device cooperation has issued a grant to Dr. Cohen, who with assistance from their senior management and consultants, systematically appraised the evidence around the efficacy and safety of a competitor technology. We are perplexed; however, on how to classify this effort in the realm of academic medicine, as this sets a new precedent of conflict of interest. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 21, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Barham K. Abu Dayyeh, Manoel Galvao Neto, Gontrand Lopez-Nava, Reem Z. Sharaiha, Vivek Kumbhari, Erik B. Wilson Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comments on: Operative Time as a Marker of Quality in Bariatric Surgery
Does operative time (OT) matter and should it serve as a quality metric? Does shorter OT indicate superior and efficient surgical skills or does it contribute to less attention to detail and more mistakes? Does longer OT suggest a safe and considered approach, or inefficiency, poor skills, and inexperience? OT is the result of amalgamation of surgical skill, patient factors, case complexity, surgical trainee involvement, surgical team, equipment, and infrastructure. It is difficult to determine the exact magnitude of contribution of each factor to OT, but it is intuitive that a surgeon ’s technical skill has great im...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 21, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Saber Ghiassi Source Type: research

Opioid Usage at Bariatric Patients
We read with interest the article “Opioids and bariatric surgery: A review and suggested recommendations for assessment and risk reduction.” by Heinberg et al. (1) published online in the Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. The authors evaluated the usage of opioids before/after bariatric surgery. They have stated that the re was no decrease in opioid use despite the decrease in obesity and related pain after bariatric surgery . And also an increase at the levels of morphine equivalents could be seen over time. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 21, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Ali Kagan Coskun, Mehmet Burak Eskin Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Outcomes of a novel bariatric stent in the management of sleeve gastrectomy leaks: A multicenter study
The management of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) leaks remains a challenge. This can be treated with placement of self-expandable metal stents, which are most effective in the acute and early settings. However, migration is a frequent adverse event (AE). Novel fully covered stents with a larger proximal flare to limit migration designed specifically to treat post-sleeve leaks were recently introduced. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 21, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Diogo Turiani Hourneax de Moura, Eduardo Guimar ães Hourneaux de Moura, Manuel Galvão Neto, Pichamol Jirapinyo, Newton Teixeira, Ivan Orso, Luiz Gustavo Quadros, Artagnan Amorim, Filipe Medeiros, Durval Rosa Neto, João de Siqueira, Alvaro Albano, Luiz Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Gastroesophageal reflux –related physiologic changes after sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a prospective comparative study
The development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a major concern as it affects the quality of life of the patients and potentially exposes them to the complications of GERD. The reported incidence of GERD after LSG is up to 35%. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is considered the procedure of choice for patients with morbid obesity with GERD but objective evidence based on physiologic studies for the same are limited. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 20, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: P. Praveen Raj, Siddhartha Bhattacharya, Shivanshu Misra, S. Saravana Kumar, Mohd. Juned Khan, Sridhar Chinnaswami Gunasekaran, C. Palanivelu Tags: Original article Source Type: research

The relationship between food insecurity and binge and night eating symptoms in prebariatric surgery patients is mediated by depressive symptoms
Eleven percent of households in the United States experience food insecurity, which is a lack of access to adequate, desirable food for a healthy lifestyle. Although food insecurity is associated with increased risk of obesity and nonadherence to dietary management of chronic diseases such as diabetes, the correlates of food insecurity have not yet been studied in a bariatric surgery population. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 20, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Hana F. Zickgraf, Emily Stefano, Julia Price, Susan Veldheer, Ann Rogers, Andrea Rigby Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Gastro-esophageal reflux related physiological changes following sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: A prospective comparative study
The development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a major concern as it affects the quality of life of the patients and potentially exposes them to the complications of GERD. The reported incidence of GERD after LSG is up to 35%. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is considered the procedure of choice for patients with morbid obesity with GERD but objective evidence based on physiological studies for the same are limited. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 20, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: P. Praveen Raj, Siddhartha Bhattacharya, Shivanshu Misra, S. Saravana Kumar, Mohd. Juned Khan, Sridhar Chinnaswami Gunasekaran, C. Palanivelu Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

The relationship between food insecurity and binge and night eating symptoms in pre-bariatric surgery patients is mediated by depressive symptoms
Eleven percent of households in the United States experience food insecurity, a lack of access to adequate, desirable food for a healthy lifestyle. Although food insecurity is associated with increased risk of obesity and non-adherence to dietary management of chronic diseases like diabetes, the correlates of food insecurity have not yet been studied in a bariatric surgery population. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 20, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Hana F. Zickgraf, Emily Stefano, Julia Price, Susan Veldheer, Ann Rogers, Andrea Rigby Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

CYP450 activities before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: correlation with their intestinal and liver content
Several anatomic and physiologic changes occur after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and its associated weight loss. At present, no single unified model can predict changes in drug metabolism associated with either RYGB surgery or weight loss. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 20, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: C élia Lloret-Linares, Youssef Daali, Chadi Abbara, Claire Carette, Jean-Luc Bouillot, Eric Vicaut, Sebastien Czernichow, Xavier Declèves Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Safety of Bariatric Surgery in Patients Older Than 65 Years
The increase in life expectancy along with the obesity epidemic, have led to an increase in older patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There is conflicting evidence regarding the safety of performing bariatric procedures on older patients. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 17, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Iliya Goldberg, Jie Yang, Lizhou Nie, Andrew T. Bates, Salvatore Docimo, Aurora D. Pryor, Tyler Cohn, Konstantinos Spaniolas Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Serum uromodulin and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: improvement of a marker reflecting nephron mass
Early diagnosis of kidney disease in obese patients and in such patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) can significantly improve treatment outcome. Serum uromodulin (sUMOD) may be a sensitive parameter for early detection of nephropathy. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 15, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Katharina M. Scheurlen, Adrian T. Billeter, Stefan Kopf, Victor Herbst, Matthias Block, Peter P. Nawroth, Martin Zeier, J ürgen E. Scherberich, Beat P. Müller-Stich Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Serum uromodulin and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass – improvement of a marker reflecting nephron mass
Early diagnosis of kidney disease in obese patients and in such with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) can significantly improve treatment outcome. Serum uromodulin (sUMOD) may be a sensitive parameter for early detection of nephropathy. (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 15, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Katharina M. Scheurlen, Adrian T. Billeter, Stefan Kopf, Victor Herbst, Matthias Block, Peter P. Nawroth, Martin Zeier, J ürgen E. Scherberich, Beat P. Müller-Stich Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Comment on: Changes in total sperm count after gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy: the BARIASPERM prospective study
Obesity surgery has triggered great enthusiasm as an adjunctive treatment of infertility in women suffering from obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome and irregular menstrual patterns (1). However, when it comes to male fertility issues, surgical outcomes interpretation is more complex. On one hand, male obesity has been associated with worse quality of semen (2) and weight loss has been shown to improve it (3). On the other hand, whilst one can expect that obesity surgery leads to increased testosterone levels and improved reproductive function, evidence in the field is sparse and inconsistent. (Source: Surgery for Obesity...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Anna Kamocka, Alexander Dimitri Miras Source Type: research

Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy for Class III Obesity in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Heartmate III
We describe the successful management of an obese patient suffering end stage heart failure(ESHF) by the combination mechanical circulatory support using a LVAD and bariatric surgery using laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy(LSG). (Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases)
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - May 14, 2019 Category: Surgery Authors: Aittigrine Souhila, Tozzi Piergiogio, Hullin Roger, Yerly Patrick, Regamey Julien, Lorenzo Rosner, Rusca Marco, Mantziari Styliani, Suter Michel, Kirsch Mathias Source Type: research