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Being queer in the jungle: The unique challenges of LGBTQ scientists working in the field
The Stonewall Riots occurred on June 28, 1969. It was this summer evening that sparked the Gay Rights Movement. Now, forty-eight years later, the world celebrates Pride Month every June to celebrate, honor, support, and fight for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community. The queer community is resilient. No matter what obstacles they encounter, their battle to live, pursue their passions, and contribute to society endures. For many queer people that passion is science.  Queer scientists such as Alan Turing who was crucial in ending World War II, and Sara Josephine Baker who made unprecedente...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - June 28, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ben Ragen Tags: Uncategorized field research LGBTQ Source Type: blogs

Motherhood, the Brain and Dementia: Changing Hormones Alter Risk
Throughout decades of study, hormone therapy (HT), often but not always the same as hormone replacement therapy (HRT), has been glorified and demonized in turn. The information that doctors receive has come from ongoing studies that seemed to offer over time radically conflicting results. A new study may add more confusion since this study has found that not only does HT given near menopause create changes in a woman’s brain, but motherhood itself creates changes. Read full article on how changing hormones can alter the risk of Alzheimer's: Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stor...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 13, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Movember: Stashing prostate and testicular cancer awareness into the limelight
Since 2003, the Movember movement has been raising public awareness of testicular and prostate cancer. The common theme that links cancers of all types is that early detection tends to lead to better outcomes. Because cancer often has no symptoms in its early stages, screening for cancer has been an integral part of primary care routine visits. I go for an annual physical every year. Do I really need to do self-examinations? Although routine screening by a health care provider is critical, it does not alleviate the need for self-examinations. In terms of gender-specific cancers, breast cancer is one that receives a great d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prevention Prostate Health Screening Source Type: blogs

Antidepressants And Women ’s Bones
Certain antidepressants used to relieve hot flashes, night sweats and other menopausal symptoms appear to increase the risk of bone fractures. The class of drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), include Celexa, Lexapro, Prozac, Luvox, Paxil and Zoloft, and are now considered effective alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. Investigators from Boston’s Northeastern University used a pharmaceutical database to identify more than 137,000 women age 40 through 64 who began taking SSRIs for menopausal symptoms between 1998 and 2010 and compared them with some 236,000 women taking prescription drugs fo...
Source: Dr. Weil's Daily Health Tips - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dr. Weil Tags: Science and Supplement News antidepressant bone density bones Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 64-year-old woman with an incidental pituitary adenoma
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 64-year-old woman is seen for follow-up evaluation. Two weeks ago, she was in a car accident, and an incidental pituitary adenoma was found on a cervical spine CT scan. She has no residual injuries from the car accident. She is otherwise healthy and takes no medications. She went through menopause at age 51. She has night sweats two to three times per month and occasional hot flushes. These have improved over the past decade and are not bothersome. She is not sexually active. She has never taken hormon...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

Risk-Factor Based-Medicine and Its Discontents
By MICHEL ACCAD, MD If concepts could get awards, then “risk factor” would surely be a Nobel prize winner.  Barely over 50 years of age, it enjoys such an important place in medicine that I suspect most of us doctors could hardly imagine practicing without it.  Yet, clearly, the concept is not native to our profession nor is its success entirely justified. A few years ago, on the occasion of the risk factor’s fiftieth anniversary, my colleague Herb Fred and I published an editorial highlighting some of the problem with the use of this concept.  I will summarize here some of those ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Rethinking Gonad Removal in Individuals w/ Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome
Lauren in MTV’s “Faking it” has AISWhat if you were genetically male, but your body was blind to testosterone ? I’ve just described XY Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome, or CAIS, a genetic condition in which there is a defect in the androgen (testosterone) receptor gene – located, ironically, on the X-chromosome.* Describing CAIS XY (genetically male) individuals with CAIS have gonads (testes) that manufacture testosterone, but their body’s cells cannot see the testosterone. As a result, their internal and external genitalia develop as female, but the vagina is shortened and ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - June 20, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Women's Health AIS Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome CAIS Intersex Source Type: blogs

What’s the best way to get rid of bed head? Episode 122
Does this bed head product really work? Sasha asks…Can Ma Cherie Perfect Shower fix your bed better than regular water? Is this worth the money or is it nothing more than water mixed with leave in conditioner? Let’s begin by talking about what causes bed head. First, you have to realize that there are two different kinds of bonds that control the shape of your hair. There are the disulfide bonds – these are very strong chemical bonds (kind of like the rungs of a ladder that keep the proteins in your hair locked in shape. These are very tough to break – think relaxer or straightening treat...
Source: thebeautybrains.com - March 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Perry RomanowskiDiscover the beauty and cosmetic products you should use and avoid Source Type: blogs

What ’s the best way to get rid of bed head? Episode 122
Does this bed head product really work? Sasha asks…Can Ma Cherie Perfect Shower fix your bed better than regular water? Is this worth the money or is it nothing more than water mixed with leave in conditioner? Let’s begin by talking about what causes bed head. First, you have to realize that there are two different kinds of bonds that control the shape of your hair. There are the disulfide bonds – these are very strong chemical bonds (kind of like the rungs of a ladder that keep the proteins in your hair locked in shape. These are very tough to break – think relaxer or straightening treat...
Source: thebeautybrains.com - March 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Perry Romanowski Discover the beauty and cosmetic products you should use and avoid Source Type: blogs

Readmissions, Observation, and Improving Hospital Care
By ASHISH JHA, MD Reducing Hospital Use Because hospitals are expensive and often cause harm, there has been a big focus on reducing hospital use.  This focus has been the underpinning for numerous policy interventions, most notable of which is the Affordable Care Act’s Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP), which penalizes hospitals for higher than expected readmission rates. The motivation behind HRRP is simple: the readmission rate, the proportion of discharged patients who return to the hospital within 30 days, had been more or less flat for years and reducing this rate would save money and potentia...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: Featured THCB Ashish Jha Source Type: blogs

DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 13
In this study, cangrelor was discontinued 1-6 hours prior to surgery, while aspirin was continued throughout the perioperative period. Bridging with cangrelor did not increase major bleeds prior to surgery, though minor bleeds, mostly ecchymosis at venipuncture site, was higher. P2Y12 assay documented sufficient platelet inhibition corresponding to levels required for anti thrombotic effect [1]. Cangrelor is awaiting approval and more large scale trials regarding the use of bridging are needed. Reference 1. Angiolillo DJ et al; BRIDGE Investigators. Bridging antiplatelet therapy with cangrelor in patients undergoing ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - February 7, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Today is National Wear Red Day
National Wear Red Day® is a special day dedicated to bringing attention to this staggering fact that each year, 1 in 3 women die of heart disease and stroke. Today we wear red to encourage women to raise their voices, know their cardiovascular risk and take action to live longer, healthier lives. For more information visit: http://www.goredforwomen.org/wearredday/. In honor of National Wear Red Day® we are re-running the post below. Heart Disease – It Looks Different From a Woman’s Perspective By Terri L. McCulloch Lara D. knew that heart disease ran in her family. Her father had his first heart ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - February 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Go ahead: Eat your meat
“Reduce your intake of cholesterol, fat, and saturated fat.” “Use more polyunsaturated fats.” “Move more and eat less.” “Oats are heart healthy.” “Follow a balanced diet.” “Eat more healthy whole grains.” Well, add yet another “proven” statement of purported nutritional fact to this sad list of nutritional blunders: “Red meat is a carcinogen,” as was concluded by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, or IARC. Release of this analysis prompted the usual over-the-top headlines and exaggerations, such as NPR’s Alis...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 27, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora cancer carcinogen gluten grains red meat Source Type: blogs

Health Information Technology: A Guide to Study Design For the Perplexed
This study, which was widely reported in the news media and influenced policy, found significant differences in the rate of flu-related deaths and hospitalizations among the vaccinated elderly compared with their unvaccinated peers. Although it controlled for certain easy-to-measure differences between the 2 groups, such as age, sex, and diabetes, it did not account for other more difficult-to-measure “healthy user” factors that affect the well-being of the elderly, such as their socioeconomic status, diet, exercise, and adherence to medical treatments and advice. The cohort design has long been a staple in st...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Hormone Imbalances and Testing: Which Test is Right for You?
As we age, one of the first things to go is often our hormone balance. Hormones are the critical chemicals that keep our bodies in alignment, help us get enough sleep and maintain our energy levels. As we get older our hormone levels change. Throw in the stress that many of us feel from raising children, managing careers, taking care of ill or aging parents, and the result? Low energy and an overall feeling of exhaustion! Lori Van Popering, a Certified Holistic Practitioner and Coach, has been there! She knows what it’s like to feel exhausted, foggy and just “not herself”. Her hot flashes, weight gain, di...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Consumer Health Care Source Type: blogs

Avoiding Expensive And Consequential Health Care Decisions Based On Weak Research Designs
Long before Congress created the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, giving $32 billion to health care providers to transfer to Electronic Health Records (EHR) vendors, plans for that windfall were created by an by Health Information Technology (HIT) vendors, HIT enthusiasts, and friendly politicians (like Newt Gingrich). The plans included an enormous lobbying campaign. Congress responded obediently. Most commentators focus on that $32 billion for the HITECH Act’s incentives and subsidies. But that was only seed money. The real dollars are the trillions providers spent and wi...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 31, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Stephen Soumerai and Ross Koppel Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Health IT Long-term Services and Supports Quality ACOs CDC HITECH Act methods ONC Research Source Type: blogs

Weighing the Risks of Hormone Therapy
The post below originally ran on Huffington Post’s Healthy Living blog on February 19. To see the original post click here. For over a decade, hormone therapy (HT) has been a hot topic in medicine. Unfortunately, women are still confused and concerned about using HT after two federally-funded studies linked HT to potentially serious health risks. Even decades after these studies, information on HT is seriously muddied, and not much is still fully known or understood about the treatment. It’s time to clear up the confusion and debunk the false reports surrounding its risks. HT is used to primarily treat menopaus...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Aging Women's Health Source Type: blogs

As Vaccination Rates Dip, Parents Walk A Tightrope Between Doubt And Risk
The recent re-emergence of measles in the United States following a 15-year period of occasional cases provides a compelling example of an unresolved societal tension in public health: that between the value of autonomous decision-making and the need for social responsibility. The outbreak---more than 700 cases since January 2014---reveals not only this tension, which also plagues other arenas of health care reform. It also reveals the tenacity of doubt about vaccine safety that has led to a tipping point in undermining herd immunity. (That is, within a community, high rates of immunization protect both individuals and th...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 23, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Sharon Kaufman Tags: Featured Population Health Public Health autism risk awareness vaccines Source Type: blogs

Heart Disease – It Looks Different From a Woman’s Perspective
Lara D. knew that heart disease ran in her family. Her father had his first heart attack at 46.  His second, two years later, took his life when she was in high school. She learned intimately the impact that a heart attack has on a family. She saw her mother struggle to keep her children on track while trying to manage her own feelings of loss. Her college years were spent working full time and going to a community college in the evenings to get her degree and become a CPA. While many women work hard to get a degree, holding full time jobs, raising children and supporting spouses, this wasn’t what her parents ha...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - February 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Chronic Conditions Women's Health Source Type: blogs

A Review of the Endocrinology of Aging
Here is an open access review of what is known of changes in the endocrine system that occur with aging. This is many steps removed from the low-level cellular and molecular damage that causes degenerative aging. It is a good example of a body-wide set of linkages between organs and signals and processes in which every change or failure in one component part will cause corresponding reactions in all of the other components. A sizable field of medicine continues to focus on these changes, trying to find ways to shift levels of hormone signals to be closer to measures taken in youth. In past decades this has produced some l...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 22, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Memory Loss Turned Back with Calorie Restriction and Exercise
There is primary aging and there is secondary aging. The former is a side-effect of the operation of metabolism, an accumulation of damage about which little is done at present. The latter is the consequence of an unhealthy lifestyle, which at the most obvious end of the spectrum includes the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes caused by becoming sedentary and fat. Over the years numerous studies have shown that some of the declines of aging taken as inevitable are in fact self-inflicted by our own indulgences in this age of comparative leisure and low-cost calories. There is a modest difference to be made here, it is t...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 1, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Dispelling the Myths of Insulin Therapy
By Betsy Carlisle In my position as a pharmacist and certified diabetes educator, physicians often assign me the task of starting their patients with Type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy. Unfortunately, in most situations, insulin has been presented to these patients as a last-ditch treatment option, after target glucose goals have not been achieved or maintained with lifestyle modifications and other therapies. Not surprisingly, I encounter people who are upset at the news that insulin is now necessary. Others feel anxious or overwhelmed by the prospect of fitting insulin into their lifestyles. Many people believe that ins...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 5, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Betsy Carlisle Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, July 31, 2014
From MedPage Today: Florida ‘Gun Gag’ Angers Medical Societies. Medical societies condemned the federal court decision allowing Florida to forbid physicians from asking patients if they keep firearms at home, with severe penalties for violators. Compromise Reached on Vets’ Healthcare. Congressional leaders appear to have reached a compromise on a bill to improve healthcare for military veterans, many of whom have been struggling with long waits at Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare facilities. Room for Improvement — Even in Quality Measures. I am a long-time proponent of measuring provider perfo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 31, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Endocrinology Heart Source Type: blogs

Hormone Therapy At Menopause Fails To Halt Heart Disease Progression
More than a decade ago the Women’s Health Study produced surprising and important results when it showed that broad use of hormone replacement therapy did not reduce cardiovascular risk in post-menopausal women. But the study also led to speculation  that hormone therapy  might be beneficial when delivered closer to the time of menopause. Now a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine shows that menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) may have some favorable effects on some cardiovascular risk factors but it does not reduce the progression of atherosclerosis. … Click...
Source: CardioBrief - July 28, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: Policy & Ethics Prevention, Epidemiology & Outcomes estrogen hormone replacement therapy HRT Menopause Women's Health Initiative Source Type: blogs

Low T, marketing, youth, and sex
Hormone replacement therapy is back in the news: not estrogen/progesterone for women, but testosterone for men. There are some similarities between the two therapies. Each was/is heralded by claims for the amazing cures it would/will provide for a multitude of life’s ailments. Estrogen/progesterone was prescribed for legions of women with a lot of assumptions that it would do wonderful things like help dementia and cardiovascular... // Read More » (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 7, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Joe Gibes Tags: Health Care aging bioethics biotechnology enhancement Health Care Practice Low T medicine sex syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dear Senator/Representative — US healthcare needs more knowledge
If you had to write a one page memo to a Senator/Representative detailing the one thing they could do to improve US healthcare, what would it be? For me, it’s improving the wastefulness of our system. Here is my attempt at a memo: Comparative Effectiveness Research is a win-win: Knowledge always is. US healthcare is too big and too wasteful. Inefficiency is the conflict that needs resolution. Dare I say there is too much fat in our system? As an experienced physician, I believe the main cause of inefficiency is a deficit in knowledge. When we don’t know something, we are often scared. Fear and ignorance pushes...
Source: Dr John M - January 13, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Risk of venous thrombosis in men vs women
Regarding risk of venous thrombosis in men vs women, true statement is: a) Risk of first venous thrombosis is almost equal in men and women and second venous thrombosis higher in men b) Risk of both first and second venous thrombosis is higher in men c) Risk of both first and second venous thrombosis is higher in women d) None of the above Correct answer: a) Risk of first venous thrombosis is higher in women and second venous thrombosis higher in men A recent study [Roach REJ et al. Sex Difference in Risk of Second but Not of First Venous Thrombosis - Paradox Explained. Circulation. 2014; 129: 51-56] showed that ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 7, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Weekly Roundup – December 6, 2013
Happy Friday! It has been a while since the roundup ran on a Friday; we were trying different days to see what our fabulous readers preferred. If you have a preference let us know. Does hormone replacement therapy help aging women’s moods and mental agility? The Los Angeles Times ran an article on a study that says it is not helpful, read the article for more on this study as well as a few others that are in the works. A study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that vaccination programs for children have prevented more than 100 million cases of serious contagious disease in the United Sta...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - December 6, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Roundup Columbia University Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Kaiser Health News Los Angeles Times new york times Palliative care USA Today usatoday Source Type: blogs

Long Terms Study Results Offer Broad Perspective On Hormone Replacement Therapy For Women
More than a decade ago the NHLBI’s Women’s Health Initiative trials overturned the conventional wisdom that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopausal women helped protect women from a broad spectrum of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. The findings caused dramatic reductions in the use of HRT but important questions remained, many involving the age or time since menopause of women taking HRT.  Now a report published in JAMA provides for the first time a comprehensive overview of the risks and benefits of HRT. “Overall,” the authors state, &ldquo...
Source: CardioBrief - October 1, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: People, Places & Events Prevention, Epidemiology & Outcomes hormone replacement therapy Hormone therapy HRT Jacques Rossouw Menopause national heart lung and blood institute Women's Health Initiative Source Type: blogs

Changing the culture of American Medicine — Start by removing hubris
This may be the most important post I have ever published. I’m going to tell you about a study that should change the entire way doctors approach patients, and how patients should think of prescribed treatments. These findings should begin a culture change in American medicine. Background: I used to think Medicine would get easier over time. It makes sense, right? You see patterns, you learn how treatments work, and you just get to know stuff. Experience should make it easier to diagnose and treat. That’s not been the case for me. In fact, it’s closer to the opposite. In the exam room, as I look up to the...
Source: Dr John M - July 28, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

10 Misconceptions of Hormone Replacement Therapy
Hormone replacement therapy isn't a one-size-fits-all approach.Contributor: Menopause MoxiePublished: Jul 26, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - July 26, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Women Suffer Higher Rates of Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer's Disease
Researchers found that women with mild cognitive impairment (a condition precursory to AD diagnosis) experienced higher rates of cognitive decline than men; and, the magnitude of the sex effect was as large as that of the APOE ε4 allele. +Alzheimer's Reading Room The rates of regional brain loss and cognitive decline caused by aging and the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are higher for women and for people with a key genetic risk factor for AD, say researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.  The study was published online July 4 in the American Journal of Neuroradi...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - July 10, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) and Cardiac Risk
Question: I am a 51 year-old woman having a rough menopause, and I'm confused about hormone replacement therapy. I like the idea of using HRT to relieve my hot flashes and other symptoms, but I've read that HRT can cause heart attacks, and I'm also worried about the cancer risk. My doctor says it would be OK to use HRT for a few years. I'd like to believe her but I'm afraid. Is my doctor right?...Read Full Post (Source: About.com Heart Disease)
Source: About.com Heart Disease - July 8, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Hot flashes no more!
Deb posted this comment in response to the Smarter, Faster, Better post describing the transformations in her brother’s life and her own health minus wheat: After watching my 52-year-old brother drop 53 pounds in 6 months, I knew he was onto something BIG! For years he had experienced severe digestive issues, was turning into a recluse, he complained constantly about aches and pains, and he was depressed. A friend turned him onto Wheat Belly and it changed his life. Thank you for giving me my brother back! After eliminating wheat, he no longer has any digestive-colitis issues, his depression is gone (without medicati...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 26, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

The Testosterone Trap
Should the Modern Man Be Taking Testosterone? Is It Low T? .com By now you've likely seen the commercials. Fit-looking middle-age men telling you how they put on weight, had less energy, and were no longer the sexual tigers they were in their twenties -- until, that is, they started rubbing testosterone gel on their shoulder, upper arm, or abdomen. Now they feel more like the men they used to be. The commercials don't mention a 2009 study in the New England Journal of Medicine wherein a group of men on testosterone replacement therapy had more than four times the number of cardiovascular problems -- so many that the s...
Source: PharmaGossip - May 2, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

HRT May Prevent Accelerated Biological Aging for Alzheimer’s Gene Carriers
A little more than a decade ago, most physicians considered hormone replacement therapy an important part of treating postmenopausal women because of its ability to help control hot flashes, maintain bone health and lower the risk of colorectal cancer. Their enthusiasm for this treatment came to a halt in July of 2002, when the same physicians took their patients off HRT nearly across the board.  An article in the New York Times explains what happened.  “A rigorous study found that the [HRT] drugs, a combination of estrogen and progestin, caused small increases in breast cancer, heart attacks, stro...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 21, 2013 Category: Caregivers Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Wall Street traders: how trading affects your hormones…and vice versa.
Paying attention to your hormones pays off. Literally. If you’re a trader on Wall Street, you know how stressful it can be. But did you know that the stress caused by the market’s ups and downs can affect your hormones? And your hormones can affect your health…and your wins and losses. Research shows that when your trades are profitable, your body releases testosterone. Testosterone can make you feel euphoric and dominant—like you can conquer the world. But when the market is volatile, your body releases cortisol, a stress hormone. (Pressure from upper management also contributes to cortisol produc...
Source: Doctor Kalitenko antiaging blog - April 11, 2013 Category: Physicians With Health Advice Authors: admin Source Type: blogs

Hot Flashes: Maybe it’s menopause. Maybe it’s not.
Hot Flashes could be the symptom of a disease you don’t know you have. Drenching night sweats. Embarrassing hot flashes. Mood swings. Forgetfulness. Are your menopausal symptoms making mid-life miserable? If so, you may have considered Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT). That’s a smart approach; many doctors prefer Bioidentical hormones over synthetic because they’re closer to your own natural chemistry. Consider this first:  Not all hot flashes are created equal. In other words, your menopausal symptoms may not be caused by menopause at all!  Here’s a true story about a pati...
Source: Doctor Kalitenko antiaging blog - March 20, 2013 Category: Physicians With Health Advice Authors: admin Source Type: blogs

HRT for Menopause?
This article I saw on Yahoo News is an example of why patients ought not to go scouring the Internet for all their medical information.  The title of the article "Doctors Clear Up Confusion Over Hormone Therapy" is rather misleading.  Hormone replacement therapy (i.e. supplement estrogen and progesterone pills) has long been known to be the best intervention for refractory menopausal symptoms.  Unfortunately, a Women's Health Initiative study from a decade ago demonstrated that subsets of post-menopausal of women who took hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) medication increased t...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - March 17, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD Source Type: blogs

HRT for Menopause?
Thisarticle I saw on Yahoo News is an example of why patients ought not to go scouring the Internet for all their medical information.  The title of the article "Doctors Clear Up Confusion Over Hormone Therapy" is rather misleading.  Hormone replacement therapy (i.e. supplement estrogen and progesterone pills) has long been known to be the best intervention for refractory menopausal symptoms.  Unfortunately, a Women's Health Initiative study from a decade ago demonstrated that subsets of post-menopausal of women who took hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) medication increased th...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - March 16, 2013 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

What Happened to Science?
Over on the New York Times Sunday Dialogue, our colleague, friend, and former guest blogger Dr. Robin Weiss has an conversation on Science and Politics.  What happened to science, Dr. Weiss ponders?  But a disturbing trend threatens future public health initiatives. At the heart of successful public policy lies a shared, bipartisan assumption that science is trustworthy. Lately, politicians unashamedly issue proclamations tantamount to declaring, The world is flat. Climate change is a hoax. Vaccines cause autism. Intelligent design should be taught in biology class alongside evolution. The United States...
Source: Shrink Rap - March 10, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

HRT May Prevent Accelerated Biological Aging for Alzheimer’s Gene Carriers
A little more than a decade ago, most physicians considered hormone replacement therapy an important part of treating postmenopausal women because of its ability to help control hot flashes, maintain bone health and lower the risk of colorectal cancer. Their enthusiasm for this treatment abruptly reversed in July of 2002, when the same physicians took their patients off HRT nearly across the board. An article in the New York Times explains what happened. Read more about HRT therapy and how it may help some women: (Source: Minding Our Elders)
Source: Minding Our Elders - February 26, 2013 Category: Caregivers Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

HRT May Prevent Accelerated Biological Aging for Alzheimer’s Gene Carriers
A little more than a decade ago, most physicians considered hormone replacement therapy an important part of treating postmenopausal women because of its ability to help control hot flashes, maintain bone health and lower the risk of colorectal cancer. Their enthusiasm for this treatment came to a halt in July of 2002, when the same physicians took their patients off HRT nearly across the board.   An article in the New York Times explains... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 24, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Tell it like it is
Ghostwritten medical articles called fraud It's fraudulent for academics to give their names to medical articles ghostwritten by pharmaceutical industry writers, say two Canadian law professors who call for potential legal sanctions. Studies suggest that industry-driven drug trials and industry-sponsored publications are more likely to downplay a drug's harms and exaggerate a drug's virtues, said Trudo Lemmens, a law professor at the University of Toronto. The integrity of medical research is also harmed by ghostwritten articles, he said. 'False representation of authorship is in our view fraud.'— Trudo Lemmens Gh...
Source: PharmaGossip - February 19, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Stroke Symptoms Checklist
People in recovery may have damaged their bodies during their drinking or drugging careers. It may be helpful to know the warning signs of stroke – especially in older age groups. A stroke happens when a blood vessel carrying oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot (ischemic stroke) or ruptures (hemorrhagic stroke). When this occurs, part of the brain no longer receives the oxygen it needs, and the tissue in that area starts to die. Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) consist of stroke-like symptoms, which go away shortly after starting and produce no lasting damage. Even if your symptoms disappea...
Source: Recovery Is Sexy.com - February 14, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Sparrow Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Disease Treatment Women drinking drugging hemorrhagic ischemic warning signs of stroke Source Type: blogs

Standing Guard on the Front Line of your Patient ’s Health
Standing Guard on the Front Line of your Patient ’s Health Not only does a nurse practitioner play a vital role into the wellness of their patients, but also their passion for the field keeps them abreast on the latest and greatest resources that their patients can benefit from. When patients begin the search for a family care physician , knowing the candidates, their personalities, reputations, backgrounds and the amenities and services provided by their hospitals will help nurse practitioners pair patients with the perfect match. Top of the Class May Be Bottom of the Barrel Finding a great physician is not as ea...
Source: The Nurse Practitioner's Place - December 18, 2012 Category: Nursing Authors: NPs Save Lives Source Type: blogs