Five Fabulous Fats
Happy Fat Tuesday! On this day, celebrated in many countries with lavish parties and high-fat foods, we’re recognizing the importance of fats in the body. You’ve probably heard about different types of fat, such as saturated, trans, monounsaturated, omega-3, and omega-6. But fats aren’t just ingredients in food. Along with similar molecules, they fall under the broad term lipids and serve critical roles in the body. Lipids protect your vital organs. They help cells communicate. They launch chemical reactions needed for growth, immune function, and reproduction. They serve as the building blocks of your ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - March 5, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Susanne Hiller-Sturmhoefel and Alisa Zapp Machalek Tags: Cell Biology Chemistry and Biochemistry Pharmacology Cellular Processes Diseases Lipids Source Type: blogs

Is wheat really THAT bad?
Because it has become such a frequent item in everyday meals, suggesting that something so commonplace must be fine, people often ask: Is wheat really that bad? Let’s therefore catalog the health conditions that are associated with wheat consumption. Health conditions we know with 100% certainty are caused by consumption of wheat and related grains: Celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, cerebellar ataxia, “idiopathic” peripheral neuropathy, temporal lobe seizures, gluten encephalopathy, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, tooth decay Health conditions ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 2, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune diabetes gluten-free grain-free grains wheat wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Case 078
A 48 year old woman presents with RUQ pain of 3 days duration. She has had several similar briefer episodes but on this occasion it has not settled and she has developed jaundice. The post Ultrasound Case 078 appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane • LITFL • Medical Blog. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr James Rippey Tags: TOP 100 Ultrasound biliary system Biliary Ultrasound Choledocholithiasis Common bile duct common bile duct stone Finding the CBD Gallstones Source Type: blogs

Cracker Bowel: Why Grains are Toxic to the Human Gastrointestinal Tract
We are told to eat “healthy whole grains” to boost fiber intake, maintain bowel regularity and intestinal health–but the exact OPPOSITE is true. Wheat and grains, especially modern wheat and grains, contain an entire collection of bowel toxins. Banish wheat and grains from your diet and you are on the path to recovering gastrointestinal health and freedom from dozens of common gastrointestinal conditions. Transcript: Hi everybody, Doctor William Davis here. I call this video “cracker bowel”, because wheat and grains are a collection of very potent bowel toxins. You know, it’s ironic is...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 28, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates colitis constipation gallstones Gliadin grain-free grains IBS Inflammation irritable bowel lectins obstipation wheat belly Wheat Germ Agglutinin Source Type: blogs

Is glyphosate the REAL problem in wheat?
There’s an argument that has been batted around in online conversations, one that I thought that, because it was so patently absurd and so readily disproven, it would simply disappear into the blogosphere . . . but it hasn’t. So let’s talk about this idea. The idea goes like this: Because glyphosate is liberally applied to wheat, including its application as a desiccant and for weed control pre-planting, during maturation, and pre-harvest, the high concentrations of this herbicide in wheat products are the cause for all the problems that emerge with wheat consumption. It means that, minus glyphosate, whea...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates gluten-free glyphosate grain-free grains Inflammation roundup undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

“ I don ’ t have a gallbladder – can I still follow the Wheat Belly high-fat lifestyle? ”
This question comes up with some regularity, so I thought I’d finally post a response here on the Wheat Belly Blog. It doesn’t help that general surgeons who perform cholecystectomies are among the most desperately ignorant on diet and health and commonly tell their patients that, after removing the gallbladder, they must adhere to a low-fat diet—yes, the diet that pushes you closer to type 2 diabetes, contributes to high triglyceride levels and fatty liver, heart disease, dementia and other health problems. So can you include plenty of fats and oils in your diet after you’ve lost your gallbladder? ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora dysbiosis grain-free prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal Source Type: blogs

Sorting out the health effects of alcohol
When it comes to your beverage of choice, alcoholic beverages are unique. For millions, they are a regular part of the dining experience. They’re often an important component of social events, celebrations, and milestones; we toast people, events, and memories with alcohol. They play a key role in many religious traditions. And, of course, the alcoholic beverage industry is a major economic force, responsible for more than $220 billion in sales annually in the US. And all of this is true despite the well-known and well-publicized risks of drinking too much alcohol. The negative effects of alcohol It should be a surpr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Alcohol Health Source Type: blogs

The Most Expensive Drugs in America: Interview with GoodRx Co-Founder/Co-CEO Doug Hirsch
United States healthcare policy is currently in the spotlight as the Trump administration seeks to weaken Obamacare with actions such as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which removes the individual mandate that required individuals to carry health insurance. Another focus of the current administration’s plan is to lower drug prices with strategies like preventing brand-name drug manufacturers from blocking the entry of cheaper generics and creating incentives for cheaper drugs. While the results of this strategy have yet to play out, they do beg the question, how expensive are medications in the United States? For that an...
Source: Medgadget - June 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Net News Public Health Society Source Type: blogs

Chest pain, Ventricular Paced Rhythm, and a Completely Normal Angiogram 3 Months Prior.
One of our graduates, Rochelle Zarzar, who is now an education fellow, sent me this from one of the hospitals she works at now:An elderly woman presented with chest pain.  She had been nauseous the night before and did not feel well, then awoke 2 hours prior with chest pain.She had had a completely normal angiogram 3 months prior.Here is that angiogram report:The left main coronary artery is normal.Left anterior descending is a type 3 vessel and is normal.Left circumflex is nondominant and normal.The right coronary artery is dominant and normal.The nurses immediately recorded an ECG.  This was 2 hours after the o...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - May 29, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 41-year-old woman with burning epigastric and chest pain
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 41-year-old woman is evaluated in follow-up after presenting to the emergency department 1 week ago for burning epigastric and chest pain. In the emergency department, a complete blood count and liver chemistry studies were normal, but a radiograph of the chest and upper abdomen demonstrated calcified gallstones. The pain resolved with administration of a liquid antacid, and omeprazole was started. The pain had been present intermittently for approximately 6 months prior to the emergency department vis...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

“ Rice ” Pudding
Every once in a while, I missing having some rice pudding. Even though rice does not contain a damaging prolamin protein like the gliadin protein in wheat or the zein in corn, it still contains a mixture of unhealthy components. Wheat germ agglutinin, for instance, the very same protein in wheat, is also in rice, ready to exert its gastrointestinal toxic effects such as direct inflammatory injury to the intestinal lining, blocking the hormone cholecystokinin and thereby causing bile stasis that leads to gallstones, and blocking release of pancreatic enzymes and thereby disrupting the process of normal digestion. Rice also ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 30, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Recipes Wheat Belly Lifestyle Cauliflower gluten-free grain-free low-carb Source Type: blogs

Uncontrollable itching – the denouement
The emergency department ordered a CT scan that showed a dilated common bile duct, no pancreatic masses, a mass in the duct – stone versus other. Twelve hours after admission, he developed a temperature of 101 and a repeat CBC showed an elevated WBC with left shift. Therefore, GI did an ERCP the next day – revealing a large gallstone – not easily removable.  The placed a stent and drained pus. So this man had painless jaundice from a common duct stone. As an intern in 1976 I had a patient with ascending cholangitis.  His internist told me that he had pancreatic cancer, but had declined surgery.&...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - March 21, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Uncontrollable itching – part II
As we heard the history we stopped, prior to hearing the exam and labs, and developed a differential diagnosis.  With the combination of itching, probable jaundice and pale stools we assume either intrahepatic or extrahepatic obstruction.  Our differential diagnosis with commentary:   Primary biliary cirrhosis – much more common in women then men – but does often present at this age with uncontrollable itching Primary sclerosing cholangitis – no history of ulcerative colitis or diarrhea symptoms, but still possible Gallstone – not all common duct stones cause pain Cholangiocarcinoma ...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - March 20, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

“ I have a wheat intolerance ”
I hear this comment with some regularity when, for instance, someone recognizes me as the author of the Wheat Belly series. This is a step in the right direction. But saying that you have a wheat intolerance is like saying “I have a tobacco intolerance.” The impact of tobacco smoking on health ranges from mild impairment, to incapacitating diseases such as chronic lung disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms, to death. A rare person escapes the ravages of years of smoking, but most people develop at least one, if not half-a-dozen, health problems from cigarettes. And so it goes with wheat: It’s a rare pers...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten gluten-free grain grain-free grains health Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Five Radiology Artificial Intelligence Companies That Somebody Should Build and Invest In
By HUGH HARVEY I’ve previously written comprehensively on where to invest in Radiology AI, and how to beat the hype curve precipice the field is entering. For those that haven’t read my previous blog, my one line summary is essentially this: “Choose companies with a narrow focus on clinically valid use cases with large data sets, who are engaged with regulations and haven’t over-hyped themselves …” The problem is… hardly any investment opportunities in Radiology AI like this actually exist, especially in the UK. I thought it’s about time I wrote down my ideas for what I...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Investing Radiology Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 216
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blogJust when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 216. Question 1Where was this photo taken and what is the significance of this “Trauma Room 1”? By Jpotter1138 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27892379+ Reveal the Funtabulous Answerexpand(document....
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five aspirin Baxter burns Charles Frederic Gerhardt Charles Frederick morris saint Charles Rufus Baxter Jack Ruby JFK John Connally john f kennedy Lee Harvey Oswald Lewis Macken occam's razor parkland formula Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 210
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 210. Question 1 Burger King in Japan released the “Kuro Burger” in 2014, what ingredient did they use that could be found in an emergency department to make the burger black? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('dd...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five charcoal Curtis eye of the medicine man Fitz-Hugh fitz-hugh-curtis folie a deux rigler's triad Source Type: blogs

Naturopaths: Able to turn even Epsom salt potentially deadly
Naturopathy and naturopaths are a fairly frequent topic on this blog —and for very good reason. If there is an example of a pseudomedical " discipline " that has been gaining undeserved " respectability, " it's naturopathy. It's licensed in all too many states, and physicians who have fallen under the spell of so-called " integrative medicine, " a specialty that rebrands science-based lifestyle medical interventions as somehow " alternative " or " integrative " and uses them as a vessel to " integrate " quackery into medicine, seem to have a special affinity...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 6, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

Work History
I always find myself asking a new patient what they do or, for the elderly, what they did for work. All this stuff about heart caths and gallstones and knee scopes and the gout acting up is numbing and disconnecting. Abstract collections of fact. Case studies in a stack of medical journals. Where am I? What is this place? Why are we in this room together? Why are we sharing this space?If you aren't a doctor you wouldn't know exactly what I mean.The contrived forced intimacy. One on one, the one way sharing of embarrassing secrets and frailties. Enough of the unmentionables. Let's dis...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - September 10, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

This is your brain on alcohol
It’s no secret that alcohol affects our brains, and most moderate drinkers like the way it makes them feel — happier, less stressed, more sociable. Science has verified alcohol’s feel-good effect; PET scans have shown that alcohol releases endorphins (the “pleasure hormones”) which bind to opiate receptors in the brain. Although excessive drinking is linked to an increased risk of dementia, decades of observational studies have indicated that moderate drinking — defined as no more than one drink a day for women and two for men — has few ill effects. (A drink equals 1.5 ounces of 80...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Beverly Merz Tags: Addiction Brain and cognitive health Healthy Eating Heart Health Memory Source Type: blogs

Detecting and Treating Weight Loss in Seniors
Conclusion While many people may believe that losing body mass is a natural part of the aging process, it can be a rather serious issue. Dealing with weight loss in the elderly in a timely manner is crucial. Otherwise, weight loss can lead to other health issues or even death. Do you or someone you know have experience dealing with unintentional weight loss? Let us know in the comments section. (Source: Shield My Senior)
Source: Shield My Senior - May 17, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Vin Tags: Senior Safety Source Type: blogs

Lessons learned from constipation
Here’s an excerpt from Wheat Belly Total Health about constipation. As uninteresting as it can seem at first glance, constipation can offer useful insights into diet and health, but not simple-minded insights like “get more fiber.”   A condition as pedestrian as constipation serves to perfectly illustrate many of the ways in which grains mess with normal body functions, as well as just how wrong conventional “solutions” can stray, Keystone Kops of health stumbling, fumbling, and bumping into each other, but never quite putting out the fire. Drop a rock from the top of a building and it pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 21, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel health cellulose constipation fiber grains prebiotic Source Type: blogs

We Had You at Ultrasound, Part I
We know we don't need to remind you of the sheer power of ultrasound and its usefulness in the emergency department. Not a day goes by that the ultrasound isn't wheeled to the patient's bedside for a FAST exam, a quick gallstone check, or to rule out retinal detachment. The uses for ultrasound are endless.The first part of this series looks at the basic functionality of the machine and how to look for foreign bodies in the extremities. Even if you choose not to adopt this practice, it may inspire you to learn more about the uses of ultrasound.This is by no means a full online course! We don't intend for this blog to minimi...
Source: The Procedural Pause - March 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly: Self-Directed Health?
Director chair, film slate and load horn. Here’s a proposal for you: If, by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle, a long list of conditions are reduced or reversed at no risk, almost no cost, reversing even chronic and potentially fatal conditions . . . does that mean that the notion of self-directed health might be on the horizon, i.e., putting control over health back in our own hands? I think it does. No, we will never implant our own defibrillators or take out our own gallbladders. But so many chronic health conditions afflicting modern humans recede that I believe that it is entirely reasonable to start talking a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 16, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle arthritis autoimmune diabetes eating disorder gluten grains Inflammation joint Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Ann still going strong
Ann provided these photos, a “before” on the left and her most recent update on the right. “That’s a picture 5 years ago that was not at my heaviest. I was about 300 pounds in the picture.” You may remember Ann from two previous Wheat Belly Blog posts: April, 2015 and a June, 2015 update. Ann began her Wheat Belly journey in October, 2014 after being put on a waiting list for gastric bypass surgery while plagued with rheumatoid arthritis, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), migraine headaches, chronic hives, asthma, chronic pain and other conditions. She did n...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 25, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories autoimmune gluten grains Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Making a bad thing good
One of my daughter’s favourite TV shows is Rastamouse, a Jamaican rodent who, along with a posse of friends, solves crimes during the day then relaxes by playing Rasta music in the evening. Each episode is built around the theme of redemption; a character will err with an adverse consequence, but will then be given the opportunity to “make a bad thing good”, and there is always a resolution. This year in my state there was a doctor suicide cluster. Four of my colleagues took their own lives. I can only interpret this to mean that something is sick in our great and noble profession. When I heard that a sof...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 3, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kristin Boyle Tags: Literary Medicine beyondblue depression Source Type: blogs

Stomach Pain: It Continues – Part II
Part I can be found by clicking here: Stomach Pain: It Starts – Part I. ***** We sat quietly waiting in the waiting room. Again, we found ourselves in an odd position of being on the patient end of things. Allison, my wife, is a registered nurse. At the time she was working as an RN on a cardiac unit and I was at the end of my second year of Internal Medicine residency. Also, before this GI appointment, Allison had made a 2nd visit to the LLUMC ED. On that second visit they had decided to admit her to the Family Medicine service since her primary doctor was from the Family Medicine service. They did what they could ...
Source: JeffreyMD.com - February 23, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Dr. Jeff Tags: My Life abdominal pain EGD esophagogastroduodenoscopy gastroenterology HIDA scan stomach pain thewife Source Type: blogs

Wheat: the silent killer
I’ll hear this comment with some frequency: “Go wheat-free for 4 weeks. If you feel no better, you can go back to it.” While consumption of modern wheat can indeed yield health conditions with overt symptoms, such as joint pain, skin rashes, and pain and explosive diarrhea from irritable bowel syndrome,  many of its effects are silent and do not result in any perceived symptoms. The changes that underlie autoimmunity, for instance, that lead to multiple sclerosis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, pancreatic beta cell destruction leadi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 15, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmunity blood sugar cancer gluten Inflammation wheat Source Type: blogs

Rare Diseases Account for Subsets of Common Diseases
In June, 2014, my book, entitled Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs: Keys to Understanding and Treating the Common Diseases was published by Elsevier. The book builds the argument that our best chance of curing the common diseases will come from studying and curing the rare diseases. One of the key messages of the book is that common diseases are complex, with multiple causes, lots of associated gene variations, many different aberrant pathways, and affecting heterogeneous populations (e.g., subsets of people who seem to have clinically distinctive forms of the same disease, or subsets of people who respond quite differently t...
Source: Specified Life - June 22, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: cellular pathways common genetic disease complex diseases disease pathways heterogeneous subsets of disease orphan diseases orphan drugs rare diseases Source Type: blogs

Glands and Grains
We live in a world in which endocrine disruption–the disruption of endocrine gland function–is a growing health threat. Endocrine disruption can take many forms. It can take the form of thyroid disease provoked by industrial chemicals, such as perchlorates, the residues of synthetic fertilizers in produce. Or it could be provoked by the polybrominated dipheyl ethers flame retardants in your carpeting. Or it could be the triclosan in your antibacterial soap and hand sanitizer. It can also take the form of causing young girls to experience menstrual cycles and breast growth prematurely due to exposure to estrogen...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 19, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Health Destruction by Wheat Endocrine Gliadin Thyroid Source Type: blogs

Deglutenize your brain
A recent study from Monash University in Australia has the media declaring that gluten is good for everybody, harmful only to those with celiac disease.   Is this true? Has gluten from wheat, rye, and barley been exonerated? Should we go back to the supermarket and resume buying bread, rolls, bagels, and pasta? In this small study, 37 people with presumed “non-celiac gluten sensitivity,” NCGS, or celiac disease-like symptoms in the absence of the intestinal destruction or antibody abnormalities (e.g., transglutaminase antibodies), demonstrated no unique response to purified gluten protein. The investigato...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 21, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Gluten sensitivity Gluten-free Source Type: blogs

Deglutenize Your Brain
A recent study from Monash University in Australia has the media declaring that gluten is good for everybody, harmful only to those with celiac disease. Is this true? Has gluten from wheat, rye, and barley been exonerated? Should we go back to the supermarket and resume buying bread, rolls, bagels, and pasta? In this small study, 37 people with presumed “non-celiac gluten sensitivity,” NCGS, or celiac disease-like symptoms in the absence of the intestinal destruction or antibody abnormalities (e.g., transglutaminase antibodies), demonstrated no unique response to purified gluten protein. The investigators, fol...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 21, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Gluten sensitivity Gluten-free Source Type: blogs

Gastrointestinal recovery after the wheat battle is won
Josie posted this comment that addresses the issue of bowel health recovery post-grain removal. I have been wheat-free for almost a year now and I no longer fall asleep during the day, and my mental fog has disappeared. My wheat-free life is great! However, I am experiencing major digestion problems. I went to see a dietitian and explained to her I do not eat wheat and try not to eat grains. She emphasized that I need fiber in my diet and based on my current food intake I was not receiving an adequate amount, which was most likely the cause of my digestion problems. She respects that I do not eat wheat, but is encouraging...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 26, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Bowel flora Gastrointestinal effects of wheat Source Type: blogs

Gastrointestinal Recovery After The Wheat Battle Is Won
Josie posted this comment that addresses the issue of bowel health recovery post-grain removal. “I have been wheat-free for almost a year now and I no longer fall asleep during the day, and my mental fog has disappeared. My wheat-free life is great! However, I am experiencing major digestion problems. I went to see a dietitian and explained to her I do not eat wheat and try not to eat grains. She emphasized that I need fiber in my diet and based on my current food intake I was not receiving an adequate amount, which was most likely the cause of my digestion problems. She respects that I do not eat wheat, but is enco...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 26, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Bowel flora Gastrointestinal effects of wheat Source Type: blogs

Diabetes Australia bungles dietary advice
A Wheat Belly Blog reader passed this exchange between his father and a dietitian representing the Australian Diabetic Association onto me. While nearly all of you are no strangers to the ignorance exhibited by defenders of the dietary status quo, it occasionally helps to hear their arguments articulated. You are readily reminded just how many “holes” there are in their arguments to consume more “healthy whole grains.” My father was a very serious diabetic, but I slowly got him off the wheat last December. Now his diabetes is the best it’s been in 20 years! He was so disappointed with Diabet...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 17, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Diabetes Source Type: blogs

31 Year Old Male with RUQ Pain and a History of Pericarditis. Submitted by a Med Student, with Great Commentary on Bias!
This was submitted by a fantastic medical student who wished to remain anonymous: A 31 year old male with a history of viral pericarditis one year ago presented with right upper quadrant pain. Here is his initial ED ECG:The R-wave in V4 extends to 33 mm, the computerized QTc is 372 msThe only available previous ECG is from one year ago, during the admission when he was diagnosed with pericarditis:1 year ago ECG, with clinician and computer interpretatioin of pericarditis What do you think? What do these EKGs show? What is your plan for this patient?Here was the story from my perspective, prospectively:I was shown this ECG ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - December 20, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Are You Still Living with a Dysfunctional Gallbladder?
I was looking back at old posts to this blog, and discovered that one of my very first posts was about flushing stones from the gallbladder, something I did for years, and then my experience with gallbladder surgery.  The gallbladder has much to do with food as it has a role in aiding in the digestion of certain foods, especially fats. First, it was humbling to see how many years had gone by since my first post to this blog..where does the time go?  The picture you see in this post shows actual gallstones that I flushed from my gallbladder, if you'd like to read my story, click this link which will lead you ...
Source: Happy Nutritionist's Nuggets - October 10, 2013 Category: Nutritionists and Food Scientists Tags: Gallbladder Surgery Gallbladder Cleanse Source Type: blogs

The saga of my pancreas..feet..microbiome ..blood.. liver - part 1
Well, this just keeps going - on and on and on.  I thought I would be able to write a post when it was all done.  But clearly not.  So below is part 1 of an ongoing tale about me - my microbiome - my pancreas - my feet - my liver - my blood - and more. Medical Record from my being admitted to the hospital in 1984. This particular saga started - I guess - in 1984.  That was when, at 15 years old, I came pretty close to dying before being diagnosed with type I diabetes. My immune system had betrayed me by killing the beta cells in my pancreas.  Thanks a lot immune system.  Anyway - this is ...
Source: The Tree of Life - August 30, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

The Pros and Cons of Red, White and Bubbly
We're pumped to present our favorite story of the week from our pals at POPSUGAR Fitness! After a long day, a glass of wine may just be what's in order, especially since so many studies have proven it to be so good for us. In fact, alcohol in general has certain health benefits, like reducing the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, as well as decreasing the risk of developing gallstones. However, all these happy benefits come with a huge caveat: they are only seen in moderate drinkers (which for women means one glass a day). Drinking too much alcohol can increase your risk of breast cancer as well as a host of oth...
Source: The ND Blog: Notes from the Nutritionista by Monica Reinagel, L.D.N., C.N.S. - July 31, 2013 Category: Nutritionists and Food Scientists Tags: Nutrition diet food food news wine Source Type: blogs

Causal Link Between Higher BMI and Gallstones
Elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of gallstone disease. Whether this reflects a causal association is unknown, according to the study’s abstract.Contributor: Debbie NicholsonPublished: Jul 16, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - July 17, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Is bear bile good for skin?
According to this study, it turns out that this ingredient is good for skin conditions like psoriasis (at least when taken orally.) In this day and age of animal-rights it would be crazy to think that any company would use bear bile as an ingredient, but one never knows. In fact perhaps we should launch an investigation into the ingredients used in the Bare Escentuals line! Image credit: http://pixabay.com (Source: thebeautybrains.com)
Source: thebeautybrains.com - June 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: thebeautybrains Tags: Questions Source Type: blogs

Self-Managing Cholesterol
By David Spero As a recent study indicates, reducing LDL (“bad" cholesterol) can help prevent complications in most people with diabetes. Why is LDL cholesterol a bad thing, and how do you get to a healthy level? First, what is cholesterol? Discovered in 1769 by analyzing gallstones, cholesterol is a fat-like organic chemical that is an essential part of animal cell membranes. Without it, cells won't function properly. Cholesterol is made into bile, which is needed for digesting fats. It is also helps produce the body's natural steroids, including our sex hormones and the vital stress hormone cortisol. Cholest...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - May 15, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

MRCP: Stop Already.
Conclusions MRCP has a high rate of false normal results compared with IOC and is not as accurate as more invasive techniques. There is no need for preoperative MRCP in patients with suspected choledocholithiasis caused by stones. MRCP (magnetic retrograde cholangiopancreatography)  is a costly imaging modality (although one would have no idea how much it costs due to pricing opacity and lack of published data---I spent 30 minutes googling "how much does an MRCP cost" without finding a reliable estimate, try it yourself).  I have found it to be one of the most overused studies in modern American medicin...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - March 23, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD Source Type: blogs

MRCP: Stop Already.
ConclusionsMRCP has a high rate of false normal results compared with IOC and is not as accurate as more invasive techniques. There is no need for preoperative MRCP in patients with suspected choledocholithiasis caused by stones.MRCP (magnetic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) is a costly imaging modality (although one would have no idea how much it costs due to pricing opacity and lack of published data---I spent 30 minutes googling "how much does an MRCP cost" without finding a reliable estimate, try it yourself). I have found it to be one of the most overused studies in modern American medicine.&n...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - March 23, 2013 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Pancreatitis Risks And A Pair Of Diabetes Drug
Yet another potentially worrisome sign for a pair of widely used diabetes drugs. A new study indicates that Merck’ Januvia and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s as Byetta can double the risk of developing pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas that is linked to cancer and kidney failure. This is the same issue that has plagued both drugs over the past few years. The study, which examined insurance records for more than 2,500 diabetics between February 2005 and December 2008, found that patients hospitalized with pancreatitis were twice as likely to be taking either of the drugs than a control group of Type...
Source: Pharmalot - February 26, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Ed Silverman Tags: Uncategorized Bristol Myers Squibb Byetta Diabetes Eli Lilly Januvia Merck Novo Nordisk Victoza Source Type: blogs

How To Dispose of Medical Waste? Take It Home and Frame It! (Picture)
I'm not sure what to think of this. A reader sent me a picture of their professionally framed gallbladder they saved after having it surgically removed for cholelithiasis.  As far as I'm concerned, it's medical waste.  Heck, it's  wrapped in plastic and even has a biohazard danger sticker attached to it! We can't eat or drink at the nurses station, but patients can  take their formaldehyde infested cancer causing  medical waste home with their discharge papers?  It says, "CAUTION, CONTAINS FORMALDEHYDE".  That looks like a warning to me!  I'm just waiting for the day a hosp...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - February 20, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs