Compounds in 'monster' radish could help tame cardiovascular disease
Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in the Sakurajima Daikon, or "monster," radish could help protect coronary blood vessels and potentially prevent heart disease and stroke. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - August 8, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Compounds in 'monster' radish could help tame cardiovascular disease
(American Chemical Society) Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in the Sakurajima Daikon, or 'monster,' radish could help protect coronary blood vessels and potentially prevent heart disease and stroke. The finding could lead to the discovery of similar substances in other vegetables and perhaps lead to new drug treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Radishes grow better when fertilized with African locust bean and Mexican sunflower, thought of as common weeds
(Natural News) The Tithonia diversifolia and Parkia biglobosa plants can influence the growth, yield, and vitamin C content of radish (Raphanus sativus L.), when used as green manure, according to researchers from the Landmark University in Nigeria, together with the Nigerian Energy Commission and the National Horticultural Research Institute. The study, published in the journal Agroforestry Systems,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Sushi Healthy? Here ’s Everything You Need to Know
Americans eat sushi in venues as varied as high-end restaurants and prepared foods sections of grocery stores — and many believe it’s a nutritious choice. But is sushi healthy? “Sushi has this halo of being healthy,” says Katherine Zeratsky, a registered dietitian nutritionist and associate professor of nutrition at Mayo Clinic. After all, traditional sushi has all the makings of a health food: it’s stuffed with fresh fish, wrapped in thin sheets of seaweed and presented in neat little rolls. But experts warn not to expect your weekly spicy tuna order to slim your waistline. One of the biggest...
Source: TIME: Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sophia Gottfried Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Is The ‘ Souping ’ Trend For You?
 By Lisa Drayer, CNN (CNN) — When I first heard of “souping,” it brought me back to my clinical days working in a hospital, where pureed soups and other easy to digest foods — also known as “full liquids” — would be prescribed for patients recovering from gastrointestinal surgery, or those who had difficulty chewing or swallowing. Then I reflected upon how much I regularly enjoy soup, especially for the comfort it provides on cold, dreary days — even though, thankfully, I have no health issues that would require such an easily digestible meal. Soup is often my go-to in t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Diets Source Type: news

Bibimbap, The Delicious Dish That You're Probably Too Afraid To Pronounce
If you've ever refrained from ordering something because you didn't know how to pronounce it, we totally feel you. But no one should be deprived of the deliciousness that is bibimbap for fear of embarrassment. Once and for all, it's pronounced "bee-beem-bahp," but it might as well be called "beautiful bowl of YUM." The secret to making the perfect bowl of this healthy Korean classic is variety. Listen to your taste buds and don't be afraid to go a little crazy. Start with a base layer of warm white rice. Then add shredded cucumber, carrot, zucchini, kimchi and bean sprouts -- season or s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eat The Enemy: As Jellyfish Bloom, So Do Appetites Overseas
This story is part of "Eat The Enemy," a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table. Not all invasive species are edible, and some included in this series can be dangerous, including lionfish and wild boar. Please take caution when foraging or hunting for your own food. It's no secret that climate change is a problem for ocean dwellers. Coral reefs are suffering, mollusks are losing their skeletons and fish really don't like it hot. The seas are changing. Yet for one gelatinous creature, the deader the oceans get, the bet...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eat The Enemy: As Jellyfish Bloom, So Do Appetites Overseas
This story is part of "Eat The Enemy," a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table. Not all invasive species are edible, and some included in this series can be dangerous, including lionfish and wild boar. Please take caution when foraging or hunting for your own food. It's no secret that climate change is a problem for ocean dwellers. Coral reefs are suffering, mollusks are losing their skeletons and fish really don't like it hot. The seas are changing. Yet for one gelatinous creature, the deader the oceans get, the bet...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news