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Bibimbap, The Delicious Dish That You're Probably Too Afraid To Pronounce
If you've ever refrained from ordering something because you didn't know how to pronounce it, we totally feel you. But no one should be deprived of the deliciousness that is bibimbap for fear of embarrassment. Once and for all, it's pronounced "bee-beem-bahp," but it might as well be called "beautiful bowl of YUM." The secret to making the perfect bowl of this healthy Korean classic is variety. Listen to your taste buds and don't be afraid to go a little crazy. Start with a base layer of warm white rice. Then add shredded cucumber, carrot, zucchini, kimchi and bean sprouts -- season or s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eat The Enemy: As Jellyfish Bloom, So Do Appetites Overseas
This story is part of "Eat The Enemy," a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table. Not all invasive species are edible, and some included in this series can be dangerous, including lionfish and wild boar. Please take caution when foraging or hunting for your own food. It's no secret that climate change is a problem for ocean dwellers. Coral reefs are suffering, mollusks are losing their skeletons and fish really don't like it hot. The seas are changing. Yet for one gelatinous creature, the deader the oceans get, the bet...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eat The Enemy: As Jellyfish Bloom, So Do Appetites Overseas
This story is part of "Eat The Enemy," a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table. Not all invasive species are edible, and some included in this series can be dangerous, including lionfish and wild boar. Please take caution when foraging or hunting for your own food. It's no secret that climate change is a problem for ocean dwellers. Coral reefs are suffering, mollusks are losing their skeletons and fish really don't like it hot. The seas are changing. Yet for one gelatinous creature, the deader the oceans get, the bet...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news