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Helping children with ADHD thrive in the classroom
(University of Kentucky) Nearly 15 percent of Kentucky children are currently diagnosed with ADHD, the highest rate in the nation. While medicine alone doesn't necessarily lead to improved academic performance in the long run, a new intervention developed by UK professors is aiming to do just that. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not all STEM teachers work in a classroom
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Maroso, M. Tags: twil Source Type: news

From school star to star MP
Rosie Duffield is still in shock. It never occurred to her that when she stood as a Labour candidate in the very safe Tory parliamentary seat of Canterbury earlier this year, that she might end up as an MP. The seat had never been held by Labour. But win she did. And she’s taking her new life in her stride – despite working six or seven days a week, staying up to all hours of the night to be present for votes in the House of Commons, and juggling a hundred different things at once. After all, it’s much like being a single parent, a teaching assistant and a UNISON member, a combination that Rosie knows all...
Source: UNISON Health care news - November 6, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Ali Worthy Tags: Magazine school support staff schools stars in our schools Source Type: news

Tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology
The University of Washington Tacoma invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology in the Division of Sciences and Mathematics within the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (SIAS). This is a full-time position with a nine-month service period. The successful candidate will be an intellectually expansive scholar with a proven record in cellular biology, cellular physiology, or related field, with biomedical applications. They will also have a demonstrated commitment to creating an inclusive classroom and laboratory environment with diverse and underreprese...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

Universities drive innovation in the classroom
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) The current issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors ® (19.2) examines innovation from the university perspective, highlighting what the most innovative institutions and educators worldwide are doing to prepare future engineers and industry leaders to effectively manage IP to grow their companies and the global economy as a whole. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Does your child have walking pneumonia?
Classrooms are not only great settings for learning, they?re also the right environment for the spread of infections among students. Walking pneumonia is one of the illnesses that increases in fall when kids are together in classrooms. That's because walking pneumonia is contagious and spread when a student comes in contact with a classmate who [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 27, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Auburn University dedicates new school of nursing building
Auburn University has officially commemorated its new School of Nursing building. Construction on the 89,000-square-foot building began in spring 2016. It's the first building at Auburn to provide a home for all nursing classes, offices, active learning centers and simulation labs. Previously, nursing classes were spread among the several large classrooms. "The new building se rves as a proud place that we can call home,” said Ashley Westberry, senior in the School of Nursing. “It will bring… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

Mass lobby of parliament against cuts to school funding
Over a thousand parents, teachers, school support staff and head teachers will be attending the School Cuts mass lobby of Parliament this Tuesday, 24 October. They will bring the message to MPs that schools are seriously underfunded, which is having a negative impact on children and young people’s education. This situation must change. The majority of constituencies (400) in England and Wales will be represented. Many more who cannot attend on the day will be lobbying MPs in their constituencies. We will be asking MPs to join us in demanding that the Chancellor releases more funds for our schools to ensure every chil...
Source: UNISON Health care news - October 23, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release education lobby public services school workers teaching assistants Source Type: news

DISTRACTED: Phone use blamed for lower academic performance as students struggle to concentrate
(Natural News) Whatever you do or wherever you go, there is a high chance that you will see a person looking down on a glowing screen. Apparently, this is also prevalent in classrooms. Phone use during class lectures distracts students and makes it harder for them to concentrate, resulting to lower academic performance, a study... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teacher support, peer acceptance, and engagement in the classroom: a three-wave longitudinal study in late childhood - Weyns T, Colpin H, De Laet S, Engels M, Verschueren K.
This study aims to provide a detailed picture of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Study: Farsighted kids have trouble paying attention
A new study says farsightedness affects young children's ability to pay attention in school, which could put them at risk of falling behind in the classroom. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Farsighted Kids Have Trouble Paying Attention
TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 -- Farsightedness affects young children's ability to pay attention in school, which could put them at risk of falling behind in the classroom, a new study suggests. " We knew from our previous work that preschool and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kids that wiggle when engaged in challenging mental activities are often labeled "ADHD" and drugged with mind-altering medications
(Natural News) Many a parent of a child who’s been diagnosed with ADHD has stared in bewilderment as their child sits dead still for hours watching a movie. No wiggling, no chatting, no getting up and down every few minutes – just total focus and concentration. Put that child in a classroom environment and you... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Are the Health Needs of Incarcerated Youth?
Discussion In the US during 2011, ~60,000 youth were incarcerated at some time in a correctional facility. Boys are detained more than girls (86% vs 14% respectively in the US, 95% male in the United Kingdom in 2014) but girls have more health issues. There are racial and ethnic differences with 38-40% of detainees being black, 23% being Hispanic/Latino and 32% being white, and 5% other. For detained youth, 5% are for violent crimes, 22% for non-violent property crimes and the majority of the rest are for non-violent offices such as substance use. The average length of detainment is 3-4 months and unfortunately the rates o...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - October 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

‘Teaching kitchen’ cooks up basics for health sciences students at UCLA
Spinach, eggs, tomatoes, skillets and spatulas are not typically in a health professional ’s toolkit. But for some UCLA students, they eventually might be.At UCLA Health Sciences, students are learning about nutrition and food preparation in what might seem an unlikely place — not a classroom but rather a kitchen in a store better known for high-end kitchenware: Sur La Table. The store is playing host to a so-called “teaching kitchen,” as part of a pilot program that teaches healthy eating and cooking skills to students in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UC LA, Fielding School of Public Healt...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Thousands march in Edinburgh to demand: Pay Up Now!
Edinburgh echoed to the demand “Pay Up Now!” at the weekend, as more than 5,000 public service workers marched through the Scottish capital. The march and rally was organised by UNISON as part of the union’s Pay Up Now! campaign, which is keeping pressure on both the Scottish and Westminster governments to end the pay cap and give all workers a decent pay rise. Workers providing pubic services have seen their pay held back across the UK for almost a decade. Public sector pay rose by just 4.4% between 2010 and 2016, while the cost of living rose by 22%. The Scottish government has said it is scrapping the ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - October 10, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article News campaign dave prentis demonstration pay pay up now Scotland Source Type: news

Stigmas around periods is prompting boys to mock girls
According to Plan International UK, periods should be taught in classrooms to both boys and girls. This comes after research reveals some males believe periods should not be mentioned. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genomic Health Literacy
Part 2 of our Health Literacy Month series- Genetics has become more prominent in the news in recent years. Sometimes it looks like great scientific advancement and other times it can look a little unsettling and seem like something out of science fiction. Genomic health literacy is becoming increasingly important as precision medicine, pharmacogenomics, and direct-to-consumer genetic testing and other genetic associated topics are emerging at the intersection between health and genetics, and consumers need access to information about these and other related topics in a manner that is understandable. It has been noted that...
Source: Dragonfly - October 9, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health genetics genomics Source Type: news

South Africa: The ABCs of Autism in the Classroom - 'He Only Wants to Eat Sandwiches With Cheese'
[Bhekisisa] Autistic children experience the world differently, but this doesn't stop them from learning. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 6, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Inside a Changing First-Grade Classroom in the 1970s
When first-grade teacher Bill L’Orange invited LIFE into his classroom 45 years ago, he offered the magazine’s readers a glimpse into a world that few would have otherwise had access to — the world of the child, so foreign to many adults, as well as the world of a male elementary-school teacher. At the time, a male elementary-school teacher (like a female college professor, as one education expert put it) was rare enough to be considered newsworthy. L’Orange, whose profession is feted each Oct. 5 on UNESCO’s World Teachers’ Day, taught a group of 28 students in a Chicago suburb. When he ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lily Rothman and Liz Ronk Tags: Uncategorized 1972 Education Elementary School Leonard McCombe LIFE Magazine photography Source Type: news

Crossfire on compulsory campus carry laws: when the First and Second Amendments collide - Lewis SK.
The issue of whether concealed handgun licensees ("CHLs") should be permitted to carry firearms inside higher education academic buildings (including classrooms) has been vociferously debated over the past decade. Yet, despite the numerous voices expressin... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The 10 Deadliest Mass Shootings in Modern U.S. History
With 59 people killed, Sunday night’s mass shooting in Las Vegas marked the deadliest in modern U.S. history — and the death count is more likely to rise. Shooter Stephen Backer’s rampage at the Route 91 Harvest Festival outside the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino was not the deadliest shooting in U.S. history. That unfortunate title goes to the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre left more 200 Native Americans dead. But it’s the deadliest of the modern era. As mass shootings seemingly become more common, here are the ten deadliest shootings in modern U.S. history. 1. Las Vegas Shooting — At least 59 de...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized Crime onetime tragedy Source Type: news

Behavior at School
Josie Dawe, CPNPFrom the Desk of Josie Dawe, CPNPBehavior Concerns in the Classroom?It is that time of year when parents are meeting with teachers to discuss children's classroom behaviors. Variation in normal behavior and true behavioral problems is not always clear because " normal " depends upon the child's level of development, which can vary greatly among children of the same age. Additionally, children have individual variation of temperament, development and behavior.When Should Parents Seek Help?Your child's behavior impacts their social life.It is important for kids to have positive social interactions. ...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - October 3, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Healthy Habits Source Type: news

Global research team fills language gap in plant science
(Washington State University) To keep pace with the fast-evolving study of cellular plant science, an international team of researchers has created terminology and definitions likely to become everyday language in laboratories and university classrooms worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oregon university now pushing "fat studies" course that claims "weightism" is the new civil rights battleground
(Natural News) Overweight and obese women – and especially brown or black ones who are lesbian or identify as being gender abnormal – have a new safe space at Oregon State University (OSU). It’s in the classroom of Patti Lou Watkins, an associate professor of clinical psychology who will reportedly be teaching a new course... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teachers' self-efficacy at maintaining order and discipline in technology-rich classrooms with relation to strain factors - Elstad E, Christophersen KA.
Teachers' operational control is challenged by pupils' access to computers with internet in the classroom. The teacher's control of operations will be diminished in a technology-rich classroom. Professional growth is conditioned by teachers' experience of ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Teen Charged With Murder After Student Is Stabbed to Death Inside Classroom
(NEW YORK) — A high school student who hadn’t been getting along with two classmates suddenly attacked them with a switchblade during history class Wednesday, killing one boy and gravely wounding another, police said. Fifteen to 20 students witnessed the attack. After leaving the classroom, 18-year-old Abel Cedeno handed the bloodied knife to a school counselor he met in the hall, then went to an assistant principal’s office and quietly waited for authorities to arrive, police said. The dead student, identified as Matthew McCree, 15, was stabbed in the chest. A 16-year-old was stabbed in the chest and sid...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colleen Long and Karen Matthews / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW New York onetime Source Type: news

Teacher Reprimands Kneeling 6-Year-Old: ‘We Stand for the Pledge’
A 6-year-old student joined in the high-profile NFL protests of racial injustice by kneeling for the Pledge of Allegiance in his classroom, and his mother says the school should not have publicly reprimanded him. The boy’s mom, Eugenia McDowell, told ABC News that a teacher sent her a text message on Monday, saying her son had taken a knee during the pledge and that she had instructed him to stand to show respect for the flag. McDowell was not pleased with the response because the admonishment encroached on her son’s freedom of speech she said, showing ABC News the text. “I knew where he had seen [kneeli...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julia Zorthian Tags: Uncategorized NFL protest onetime Source Type: news

A 15-Year-Old Boy Was Stabbed to Death Inside a School Classroom
(NEW YORK) — A high school student attacked two classmates inside a school classroom Wednesday, fatally stabbing a 15-year-old boy and critically injuring a 16-year-old boy, police said. The melee unfurled around 10 a.m. on the fifth floor of the Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation, a middle and high school in the Bronx. Angry parents, some in tears, gathered outside the school demanding they be allowed to pick up their children. Police and emergency crews swarmed the school, located in a large red brick building that also houses a public elementary school. Rita Taylor, the mother of a 5-year-old student,...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colleen Long / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW Crime onetime Source Type: news

How College Students Should Prepare for Our Automated Future
Economists across the political spectrum agree that the single biggest threat to future job growth is neither immigration nor trade — it’s the artificial intelligence revolution already underway.Studies by Oxford University, McKinsey and Pricewaterhouse Coopers forecast that up to 50% of current jobs could be replaced by smart machines within the next 20 years. Already, more than 5 million U.S. factory jobs have been lost to automation since 2000. It’s become clear: If a job can be automated in the future, it will be. What’s less clear is how educational institutions — the incubators of human ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joseph E. Aoun Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Source Type: news

EMS Crews in St. Louis Area Compete in Warrior Challenge
St. Louis, Mo. (KSDK) - It was one part training exercise, one part friendly competition. Dozens of first responders from the St. Louis area competed in the second annual EMS Warrior Challenge, hosted by their supervisors through SSM Health. “It’s a skills challenge where we are testing not only physical, but mental abilities, and obstacles and different training aspects,” explained Dr. Justin Rapoff, who oversees the regional SSM Health EMS teams. Rapoff designed the course for the competition, which was held at Hidden Valley Ski Resort earlier this month. Teams of two from different ambulance distr...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer Meckles, KSDK Tags: Training News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

‘The Worst Thing I’ve Ever Seen.’ Time Is Running Out In the Search for Survivors of Mexico Quake
(MEXICO CITY) — Search teams are still digging in dangerous piles of rubble hoping against the odds to find survivors at collapsed buildings, while officials say they have so far cleared only 103 of Mexico City’s nearly 9,000 schools to reopen Monday. The need to inspect 98% of the capital’s public and private schools nearly a week after a magnitude 7.1 earthquake killed at least 182 people in the city and 138 in nearby states was a stark indicator of just how long the path back to normalcy will be. Federal Education Secretary Aurelio Nuno said Sunday that it could take a couple more weeks to inspect all ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Verza / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime Source Type: news

Group project? Taking turns, working with friends may improve grades
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led study of college students has found that the social dynamics of a group, such as whether one person dominates the conversation or whether students work with a friend, affect academic performance. Put simply, the more comfortable students are, the better they do, which yields benefits beyond the classroom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

‘I Had a Right to Be at Central’: Remembering Little Rock’s Integration Battle
It was late September 1957, and students at Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas had been in class for three weeks. Everyone, that is, but 14-year-old Carlotta Walls and eight other teenagers who were to be Central High’s first black students. They had been prevented from entering the school by an angry mob of citizens, backed up by a group of Arkansas National Guardsmen. But on Sept. 25, under escort by federal troops, Carlotta and her classmates walked up the front steps of Central High and into history. They became the highest-profile black students in the United States to integrate a formerly all-white sch...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lina Mai Tags: Uncategorized Civil Rights Education segregation Source Type: news

Mexico Struggles to Find the Missing as Death Toll From Earthquake Rises to 273
(MEXICO CITY) — As painstaking attempts to reach survivors in quake-ravaged buildings across Mexico City stretched into a third day Thursday, desperation mounted among loved ones who earlier had high hopes for quick rescues and some complained they were being kept in the dark about search efforts. And what many had clung to as the unlikely triumph of life over death was revealed to be a case of some very high-profile misinformation: A top navy official announced there were no missing children at a collapsed Mexico City school where the purported plight of a girl trapped alive in the rubble had captivated people acros...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Verza & Peter Orsi / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime Source Type: news

The goalie fighting to save dreams
There can’t be many young people whose daily educational experience includes encountering a bona fide national hero. But for those at the Canolfan yr Afon Pupil Referral Unit, in Ebbw Vale, that’s been the case for the last four years as they’ve been ably assisted by former Everton football icon Neville Southall MBE. Not that the record cap holder – he played 92 times between the sticks for the Welsh national football team – cares if his reputation precedes him. His sole vocation these days is to play at least some part in helping these complex-needs youngsters live a life that can give them t...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 21, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Demetrios Matheou Tags: Magazine cymru/wales education services unison in schools Source Type: news

Rescuers Race to Free Survivors Trapped After Mexico Earthquake
(MEXICO CITY) — The wiggling fingers of a young girl trapped in the rubble of her collapsed school in Mexico City raised hopes among hundreds of rescuers working furiously Wednesday to try to free her — a drama that played out at dozens of buildings toppled by the powerful earthquake that killed at least 223 people. But it was the ongoing rescue at the Enrique Rebsamen school, where 25 people including 21 children perished, that was seen as emblematic of Mexicans’ rush to save survivors before time runs out. Helmeted workers spotted the girl buried in the debris early Wednesday and shouted to her to move ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Sherman, Peter Orsi & Mark Stevenson / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime Source Type: news

Mexicans Dig Through Collapsed Buildings as Quake Kills 225
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Police, firefighters and ordinary Mexicans dug frantically through the rubble of collapsed schools, homes and apartment buildings Wednesday, looking for survivors of Mexico's deadliest earthquake in decades as the number of confirmed fatalities stood at 225. Adding poignancy and a touch of the surreal, Tuesday's magnitude-7.1 quake struck on the 32nd anniversary of the 1985 earthquake that killed thousands. Just hours earlier, people around Mexico had held earthquake drills to mark the date. One of the most desperate rescue efforts was at a primary and secondary school in southern Mexico City, wher...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher Sherman, Peter Orsi and Mark Stevenson, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

‘We Can Hear Small Noises.’ Rescuers Search for Survivors at Elementary School Destroyed by Mexico City Earthquake
(MEXICO CITY) — The three-story school structure had pancaked into a pile of concrete slabs. The bodies of 21 children and four adults had been pulled out. But still sounds came from the collapsed structure early Wednesday — nobody knew if they were survivors pounding for help, or simply the noises of shifting rubble. After a wing of the Enrique Rebsamen primary and secondary school collapsed in Tuesday’s magnitude-7.1 earthquake, rescuers dug at the pile of rubble and soldiers wedged in wooden beams to try to prevent it from crumbling further. Then a group of them decided to head in. Pedro Serrano, a 29...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Stevenson / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico City onetime Source Type: news

' Green Schoolyards' May Bring Better Health to Kids
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 -- A " green schoolyard " might boost the health of children in your community, researchers report. " Green schoolyards can include outdoor classrooms, native gardens, storm water capture, traditional play equipment, vegetable... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Mexicans Dig Through Rubble Seeking Survivors as Quake Kills at Least 217
(MEXICO CITY) — Police, firefighters and ordinary Mexicans dug frantically through the rubble of collapsed schools, homes and apartment buildings early Wednesday, looking for survivors of Mexico’s deadliest earthquake in decades as the number of confirmed fatalities stood at 217. Adding poignancy and a touch of the surreal, Tuesday’s magnitude-7.1 quake struck on the 32nd anniversary of the 1985 earthquake that killed thousands. Just hours earlier, people around Mexico had held earthquake drills to mark the date. One of the most desperate rescue efforts was at a primary and secondary school in southern Me...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Sherman and Peter Orsi / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime Source Type: news

Technology in the classroom: Robots could replace teachers in 10 years
(Natural News) Classroom teaching will primarily be handled by adaptable robots rather than humans within 10 years and will alter human life as we know it in the process. That is the prediction of historian Sir Anthony Seldon, vice chancellor of the University of Buckingham in the U.K., which he made at the recent British... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

44-Year-Old Man Found Guilty of Slashing His Teen Wife to Death at College
(SAN DIEGO) — A man who admitted brutally stabbing his estranged wife in a restroom at San Diego City College turned to thank the jury after he was found guilty of murder, according to a newspaper report. After the verdict was read and jurors were filing out of the courtroom on Friday, Armando Perez stood a few feet away from them and said, “Thank you” in a loud, clear voice, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported. His attorney, Barton Sheela, told the newspaper that Perez had asked him earlier if would be OK to express appreciation to the jurors for their verdict in the grisly killing of Diana Gonzalez, a ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized APW Crime onetime Source Type: news

Review: Sure, the iPhone X Is Exciting. But Don ’t Overlook the New iPhone 8
The good: More storage space, slightly faster camera, improved screen, wireless charging The bad: It doesn’t feel radically different from the iPhone 7 Who should buy: Those upgrading from an older model like the iPhone 6s who don’t want to spend $999 on the iPhone X When Apple unveiled the iPhone 7 in 2016, all anyone could talk about was that it wouldn’t have a headphone jack. Then on September 12 this year, Apple announced it was nixing another iPhone staple — the Home button. But there’s a crucial reason things are different this year. For the first time in its history, Apple announced thr...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Eadicicco Tags: Uncategorized Apple iPhone 2017 iPhone 8 iPhone 8 Plus Smartphones Source Type: news

Deadline Approaching: Enter the 2017 Faces of Biology Photo Contest
Enter the Faces of Biology Photo Contest for your chance to win $250 and to have your photo appear on the cover of the journal BioScience. The competition, sponsored by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), recognizes scientists who use imagery to communicate aspects of biological research to the public and policymakers. The theme of the contest is “Faces of Biology.” Photographs entered into the competition must depict a person, such as a scientist, technician, or student, engaging in biological research. The research may occur outside, in a lab, at a natural history collection, at a fie...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 18, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

This Teacher Turned His Classroom Into a Magical Hogwarts Destination
School is officially back in session, but for some lucky Oregon students, they’ll be returning to their studies like wizards thanks to a teacher who transformed his classroom into a magical Hogwarts commonroom. Kyle Hubler, a math teacher at Evergreen Middle School in Hillsboro, Oregon, decorated his classroom like a Hogwarts study abode, complete with designated tables for the different houses, quills and inkwells, loads of books, a Pensieve, and a sign marking the door to enter as Platform 9 and 3/4. As if these details weren’t enough to summon the spirit of Harry Potter and the gang, according to The Huffing...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cady Lang Tags: Uncategorized Harry Potter hogwarts Newsfeed viral Source Type: news

School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS)
The School Health Policies and Practices Study* (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and practices at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Having the confidence to help
It’s a long way from Kenya to a primary school in the East Midlands, but for teaching assistant Hasmita Dhamelia it’s a journey that has reaped benefits for her and many around her. In a traditional terrace house in Leicester, her front room has a shrine to gods and figures from Hindu, Christian and Buddhist religious traditions, together with shelves of books that range from Oliver Twist through The Colour Purple to a collection of Italian recipes. And for our chat, Somali-style coffee with honey and ginger accompanies Jaffa Cakes. It’s all evidence of how in Hasmita’s life cultures cross-pollinate...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Magazine activists' learning East Midlands learning reps stars in our schools teaching assistants UNISON Learning Rep Source Type: news

1 Dead, 3 Injured in Washington State High School Shooting
ROCKFORD, Wash. (AP) — A shooter opened fire at a high school in a tiny town in Washington state Wednesday, killing one student, injuring three others and sending worried parents to the school in a frenzied rush, authorities said. Brian Schaeffer of the Spokane Fire Department told reporters that one child died at Freeman High School in Rockford, south of Spokane, while three injured victims were taken to a hospital and expected to survive. "The shooter has been apprehended and is taken into custody," he said. Schaeffer, who didn't release any information about a possible motive or the age of the suspect, s...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news