Musing on “ the social ” in pain rehabilitation
What do we think about when we consider “the social” as a factor in pain rehabilitation? Do we think of socioeconomic status? Maybe employment status? Perhaps societal attitudes towards pain and recovery? Do we ask if the person has someone they trust in their life? Maybe we even discuss how a relationship is going, whether the person sees their friends and family? Have we forgotten that possibly the most potent influences on pain behaviour are the people around the person we’re seeing? It will be no surprise to anyone reading my work over the past 10 or more years (yes, really! it HAS been that lon...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - January 17, 2021 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Education Interdisciplinary teams Professional topics Research Science in practice family partners social spouses Source Type: blogs

Typical chest pain and hypotension, Activate the Cath lab?
I was texted this ECG with the info that the patient " clinically looked like he was having a myocardial infarction " :What do you think?There is atrial and ventricular pacing.  Both spikes are best seen in V1 and V2 (as always, if you click on the image, it enlarges).  The QRS is very very wide.  On the image below, I have drawn lines in every lead from the QRS onset (blue) and QRS end (red).  I measure the QRS duration at about 280 ms.  Of course, all ventricular paced rhythm is wide, but not often this wide.  One must always consider hyperkalemia when the QRS is very wide, but the...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 17, 2021 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Spinal Cord Stimulators Manage Pain without Tingling
Boston Scientific is releasing in the United States its Wavewriter Alpha line of spinal cord stimulators. The four Wavewriter Alpha pain management devices provide Bluetooth connectivity, allow patients to still be scanned under MRI, given certain precautions, and offer so-called Fast Acting Sub-perception Therapy (FAST). FAST is exciting because it provides near immediate pain relief without causing paresthesia, a tingling sensations that patients commonly report when utilizing spinal cord stimulators. Paresthesia-free stimulation therapies are already in existence, but they take a few days or even weeks to finally st...
Source: Medgadget - January 15, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Orthopedic Surgery Pain Management bostonscientific paresthesia Source Type: blogs

The Benefits of Regular Exercise during a Pandemic
We all have become a little lazy and are inactive in terms of activities due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Covid-19 pandemic has disturbed several aspects of our lives. Working from home, online training, and government limitation on gyms has led to a situation where we don’t know where and when to exercise to stay healthy. One more point we like to mention over here is that it is tempting for each one of us to stay away from the healthy routine. But as per medical science and fitness enthusiast, it is always crucial, in normal and abnormal circumstances, to follow a healthy routine for physical and mental well-being....
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Falconer Tags: featured health and fitness motivation productivity tips psychology self-improvement covid_19 exercise pandemic self improvement Source Type: blogs

A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words: How Photography Can Help Your Mental Health
When you look at a photograph, what do you see? Pictures have the unique ability to say the words left unspoken, and taking them can be beneficial for your mental health. Even parents on a busy schedule can benefit from snapping a few photos each day to relax. Hobbies offer the opportunity to enhance your life in ways you’ve never imagined. Keep reading to discover six ways photography can help your mental health. 1. Express Yourself Humans tend to bottle up their emotions and lock them deep within. Unfortunately, burying your feelings does not make them disappear. Over time, these feelings influence your...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Landis Tags: career creativity featured happiness psychology self-improvement mental health photography pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

CBD and other medications: Proceed with caution
Products containing cannabidiol (CBD) seem to be all the rage these days, promising relief from a wide range of maladies, from insomnia and hot flashes to chronic pain and seizures. Some of these claims have merit to them, while some of them are just hype. But it won’t hurt to try, right? Well, not so fast. CBD is a biologically active compound, and as such, it may also have unintended consequences. These include known side effects of CBD, but also unintended interactions with supplements, herbal products, and over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications. Doubling up on side effects While generally considered ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katsiaryna Bykov, PharmD, ScD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Marijuana Medical Research Safety Source Type: blogs

Radical? Radical!
Welcome to 2021! An interesting start to the year for my US friends, more of the same for my UK and European friends, and life in NZ and Australia goes on with an added dash of uncertainty because of the new! improved! more contagious Covid19! I’ve had a few weeks away from my usual Monday morning writing routine, but I return to the blog today with a lovely book I’ve reviewed. There’s no secret about my personal preference for ACT both for living and flourishing in daily life, and for those of us living with persistent pain. Today’s book review is about Radical Relief: A guide to overcome chroni...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - January 10, 2021 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Book reviews, site reviews Chronic pain Coping Skills Coping strategies Science in practice Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 11th 2021
This study demonstrates the potential of a natural (o-Vanillin) and a synthetic (RG-7112) senolytic compounds to remove senescent IVD cells, decrease SASP factors release, reduce the inflammatory environment and enhance the IVD matrix production. Removal of senescent cells, using senolytics drugs, could lead to improved therapeutic interventions and ultimately decrease pain and a provide a better quality of life of patients living with intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain. From Ying Ann Chiao of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation: Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in aging and cardiovasc...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 10, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

ECG with Aslanger's Pattern. CT Pulmonary Angiogram Reveals LAD Ischemia (Septal Transmural). But this is not Contradictory.
A 52 y.o. male presented with persistent central chest pressure, without radiation, SOB or diaphoresis, which began at rest approximately one hour prior to arrival.  He had never had pain like this before.  He felt slightly nauseous earlier but no vomiting.  He is denying any back pain or abdominal pain.  An ECG was recorded during pain:What do you think?This shows significant ST depression in I, II, and V4-V6, with reciprocal ST Elevation in aVR.  This suggests diffuse subendocardial ischemia.  However, along with that subendocardial ischemia, there is also STE in lead III with...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 4, 2021 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Olanzapine FTW for Nausea Outside of CINV
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A few months agoan interesting olanzapine study was published which I have been meaning to write a post about. It's important because while olanzapine has really established itself in the last decade as a highly effective antiemetic for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and is now in multiple CINV guidelines (eg Antiemetics: ASCO Guideline), etc, we don't have a lot of data for its efficacy for nausea outside of CINV, and so a well-done RCT is welcome.The study is amulti-center, US, adult, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of olanzapine for nausea in advanced cancer pat...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - January 1, 2021 Category: Palliative Care Tags: anorexia cachexia nausea olanzapine rosielle Source Type: blogs

Medgadget ’s Best Medical Technologies of 2020
In conclusion, 2020 will certainly be remembered for a world stopped by an pandemic. It will also stand out as a time when people came together to innovate, adapt, and improve the world around them. We wish you all a happy New Year and look forward to better times ahead, together. Flashbacks: Medgadget’s Best Medical Technologies of 2019; 2018; 2017; 2016; 2015 (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - December 30, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

How To Keep Your Brain Active At Any Age
There are 80 to 100 billion neurons in a human brain, leading to a complex network of hundreds of trillions of synapses that enable brain cells to communicate with each other. With all that complexity, the process of work of our mind remains a mystery. One of the biggest impacts of aging is the thinning of the frontal cortex that contributes to the formation of memories and concentration. To keep your mind clear and memory sharp, you should follow simple steps.   Move. Yes, it’s that simple. As we age, our brain cells, or neurons, lose the tree-branch-like connections between them. Quite literally, over ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - December 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Falconer Tags: featured health and fitness meditation psychology self-improvement apps brain health concentration pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Going After Scapegoats Is Easier Than Confronting The Truth
Jeffrey A. SingerYesterday the Department of Justicefiled suit against the giant retailer Walmart, accusing it of fueling the opioid crisis by encouraging its pharmacists to fill prescriptions –legally written by health care practitioners licensed by the Drug Enforcement Administration–they should have suspected of being inappropriately prescribed.The Justice Department seems uninterested in the fact that there isno correlation between the number of opioid prescriptions and the non ‐​medical use of prescription pain reliever or the development of opioid use disorder. And while the number...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 23, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Do pro-inflammatory diets harm our health? And can anti-inflammatory diets help?
This study also showed that pro-inflammatory diets were associated with a poor cholesterol profile. This finding was also seen in other another study, also published in JACC, which found that pro-inflammatory foods had a harmful effect on cholesterol levels while some anti-inflammatory foods had favorable effects. What foods are pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory? Foods with a higher pro-inflammatory potential are red meat, processed meat, and organ meat; refined carbohydrates such as white bread, white rice, and many desserts; and sweetened beverages including colas and sports drinks. Foods that have a higher anti-inf...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Food as medicine Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

The health effects of too much gaming
It is estimated that 164 million Americans — half of our population — play video games, also known as gaming. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t just teens who play games. According to a recent survey, only 21% of gamers were under 18 years old. While gaming can be a fun distraction or hobby (and is even becoming a competitive sport on many college campuses), there are health risks that come from too much gaming. What are these harms, and what can be done about them? Is there anything good about gaming? Before discussing the harms of gaming, it is only fair to mention the benefits. Aside from being ente...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Addiction Adolescent health Back Pain Behavioral Health Eye Health Mental Health Safety Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer ’ s Case Study
Chronic loneliness is on the rise. But how can this be when we’re more connected now than ever? In today’s show, Dr. J.W. Freiberg, a social psychologist-turned-lawyer, explains that loneliness is not an emotion like happiness or anger. It’s a sensation like hunger or thirst.  Join us for an in-depth discussion on the cost of feeling disconnected even when we’re surrounded by people. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Loneliness’ Podcast Episode J.W. Freiberg studies chronic loneliness through the unique lens of a social psychologist (PhD, UCLA) turned lawyer ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Psychology The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

“VRx”: A Medgadget Book Interview with Author Dr. Brennan Spiegel
In the recently released science-fiction novel Ready Player Two, protagonist Wade Watts spends the majority of the book inside a virtual reality universe called the “OASIS”. Though the OASIS is merely a simulation consisting of computer-generated imagery, immersive sound, and gesture-based interaction, it has a profound impact on reality. It’s a place where one loses the sense of time, both physical and emotional pain is identified and eased, and users can confront and overcome their deepest longings and fears. The OASIS may be fictional, but some of its seemingly therapeutic effects are factual, b...
Source: Medgadget - December 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Common cold, flu, or coronavirus?
  In the early days of the outbreak, the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) was repeatedly compared to the flu (influenza) and even to the common cold (rhinoviruses, et al). This was due to an initial impression of shared symptoms. The differences between these conditions are particularly important as we kick off National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) and the ‘flu season’. So, how can we tell which of these diseases we are dealing with in a given patient?     Common cold Let’s start with the common cold, a condition that can be caused by over 200 different strains of viruses.  On avera...
Source: GIDEON blog - December 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Diagnosis Identify News Source Type: blogs

How to be sick: challenges faced by those with chronic pain and illness [PODCAST]
“I write in my book,‘I know from experience that nothing positive comes from directing blame at yourself.’ When it comes to chronic illness (which includes chronic pain), it ’s crucial to remember that you are not the enemy. Anyone can get sick, physically or mentally, and anybody can develop chronic pain. I just got an […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 7, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/the-podcast-by-kevinmd" rel="tag" > The Podcast by KevinMD < /a > < /span > Tags: Podcast Patients Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Click Therapeutics raises $30 million in debt to advance commercialization of smoking cessation app Clickotine
Click Therapeutics Secures $30M in Growth Capital from K2 HealthVentures to Expand Operations (press release): Click Therapeutics, Inc. (“Click”), a leader in Digital Therapeutics solutions as prescription medical treatments, today announced $30 million in debt financing from K2 HealthVentures (K2HV), a healthcare-focused specialty finance company, to accelerate commercialization of its leading smoking cessation solution, Clickotine, and to advance its pipeline of clinically-validated digital therapeutics… Click Therapeutics has recently announced the achievement of key corporate milestones, including se...
Source: SharpBrains - December 4, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation Click Therapeutics Clickotine digital therapeutics K2 HealthVentures medical treatments neurotechnologies non-invasive neurotechnologies prescription Source Type: blogs

21st century outbreaks
  Which diseases have generated the highest number of cases from outbreaks during the first two decades of the 21st century?  In this blog, we can use GIDEON’s data to find out. ‘Disease outbreak’ is a scary term for many, but every year we suffer dozens, if not hundreds, of localized and international disease outbreaks across the world. While these outbreaks are always significant to those affected, they rarely generate headlines,  and can sometimes go unnoticed outside of the Healthcare Industry. An “outbreak” is often defined as an increase in case numbers for a particular di...
Source: GIDEON blog - December 3, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Treating neuropathy: Which medication is best?
Imagine experiencing burning, tingling, and numbness in your legs day in and day out, getting worse over time — and your doctors can’t find a reason for it. That’s the situation for millions of people who suffer from idiopathic sensory polyneuropathy. The term “idiopathic” means that no cause can be identified; “sensory” refers to the type of nerve, in this case those carrying nerve signals such as pain or temperature; “poly” means “many” and “neuropathy” means nerve disease. So, this is a condition of unknown cause that damages multiple nerves; ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Neurological conditions Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Top 10 most prominent diseases of the 21st Century
Which diseases have generated the highest number of cases from outbreaks during the first two decades of the 21st century?  In this blog, we can use GIDEON’s data to find out. ‘Disease outbreak’ is a scary term for many, but every year we suffer dozens, if not hundreds, of localized and international disease outbreaks across the world. While these outbreaks are always significant to those affected, they rarely generate headlines,  and can sometimes go unnoticed outside of the Healthcare Industry. An “outbreak” is often defined as an increase in case numbers for a particular disease i...
Source: GIDEON blog - December 1, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Bias: Is pain all the same?
The topic of how we define pain, and how humans respond to pain has come up for me as I mull over the IASP definition of pain. The current (new) definition is this: An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with, or resembling that associated with, actual or potential tissue damage. Six key notes: Pain is always a personal experience that is influenced to varying degrees by biological, psychological, and social factors.Pain and nociception are different phenomena. Pain cannot be inferred solely from activity in sensory neurons.Through their life experiences, individuals learn the concept of pain.A...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - November 29, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Education Education/CME Pain conditions acute pain function IASP definition maldynia metaphor pain definition persistent pain purpose Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 30th 2020
We examined specific aspects of metabolism in male PolG+/mut mice at 6 and 12 months of age under three dietary conditions: normal chow (NC) feeding, high-fat feeding (HFD), and 24-hr starvation. We performed mitochondrial proteomics and assessed dynamics and quality control signaling in muscle and liver to determine whether mitochondria respond to mtDNA point mutations by altering morphology and turnover. In the current study, we observed that the accumulation of mtDNA point mutations failed to disrupt metabolic homeostasis and insulin action in male mice, but with aging, metabolic health was likely preserved by counterme...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A woman in her 40s with acute chest pain
Case written by Neha Ray MD, Brandon Fetterolf MD, and Pendell Meyers MDA woman in her 40s with a history of rheumatoid arthritis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia presented to the ED with acute onset chest pain starting around 5am on the morning of presentation.  It woke her from sleep. The chest pain was midsternal, severe, sharp, and constant. On the previous night she had had a mild version of the same pain that she thought was heartburn (esophageal reflux). She reported some radiation to the left arm. She also reports 3 episodes of non-bloody vomiting over the course of the morning. She had a recent admission fo...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - November 29, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Weekly Overseas Health IT Links – 28 November, 2020.
 Here are a few I came across last week. Note: Each link is followed by a title and few paragraphs. For the full article click on the link above title of the article. Note also that full access to some links may require site registration or subscription payment. ----- https://mhealthintelligence.com/news/geisinger-tests-mhealth-platform-for-chronic-pain-treatment Geisinger Tests mHealth Platform for Chronic Pain Treatment The Pennsylvania health system is participating in a study that uses VR glasses and an mHealth platform to help patients manage acute and chronic pain at home. By Eric Wicklund November 19, 2020 -&nb...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - November 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Why learning about pain can help – an old study worth revisiting
If you’ve read my blog over the years you’ll see that I love a bit of history. Learning from older studies, and older opinions, can help us position our current thoughts in a larger context. Older studies can also highlight concepts that haven’t grabbed the attention nearly as much as more recent studies but still have value. Today’s post is about a studied published in 2004. It’s one I’ve often used to illustrate how influential our expectations or beliefs are when it comes to pain intensity and pain aversiveness/unpleasantness. Take 31 healthy undergraduate students (50% were wo...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - November 22, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Cognitive skills Coping strategies Education Research Science in practice Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 23rd 2020
In conclusion, the study indicates that HBOT may induce significant senolytic effects that include significantly increasing telomere length and clearance of senescent cells in the aging populations. Data on the Prevalence of Liver Fibrosis in Middle Age https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/11/data-on-the-prevalence-of-liver-fibrosis-in-middle-age/ Fibrosis is a consequence of age-related disarray in tissue maintenance processes, leading to the deposition of scar-like collagen that disrupts tissue structure and function. It is an ultimately fatal issue for which there are only poor treatment options a...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Treating the pain of endometriosis
Many women suffer through years of painful menstrual periods before they are able to get an answer about what’s causing them: a common and often undiagnosed condition called endometriosis. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a condition that occurs when tissue much like the tissue that lines a woman’s uterus — called the endometrium — starts to grow in other places inside the body. Most commonly, these growths are within the pelvis, such as on the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, the outer surface of the uterus, or the bladder. During the menstrual cycle each month, the tissue lining the uterus gro...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Pain Management Stress Surgery Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Being 75 Will Be Great, and the Younger You are Now, the Better It Will Be When You Get There
There is a certain constituency in this world of ours whose members look at the far side of middle age with a fatalistic gloom, envisaging the last, decrepit light before the darkness. The age of 75 stands out in the present discussion on this topic only for a noted op-ed touting a hoped end to life at that point. That voice isn't alone. Many people, perhaps even most people, express the desire to die on some schedule in late life, if asked. Perhaps a few years older than their peers, because hierarchy is important to we primates, but nonetheless, the present view is that after middle age we should be shutting up shop, tid...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Babies Relax When Listening To Unfamiliar Lullabies From Other Cultures
By Emma Young The controversial idea that there are universals in the ways we use music received a boost in 2018, with the finding that people from 60 different countries were pretty good at judging whether a totally unfamiliar piece of music from another culture was intended to soothe a baby or to be danced to. Now, new research involving some of the same team has revealed that foreign lullabies that babies have never heard before work to relax them.  Constance M. Bainbridge and Mila Bertolo from Harvard University led the new study, published in Nature Human Behaviour, on 144 babies with an average ag...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Babies Cross-cultural Developmental Music Source Type: blogs

A Recommended Tour of the State of Development of Senolytic Therapies
Today's article is a cut above the usual popular science standard in terms of detail and accuracy, capturing a snapshot of the present development of senolytic therapies. It is lengthy and touches on a range of present initiatives, companies, research programs, and clinical trials. Senolytics are one of the most important developments to emerge from the medical research community in quite a long time, in that they are the first rejuvenation therapy worthy of that classification. A senolytic treatment is one that selectively destroys senescent cells. These cells accumulate in old tissues, and while never rising to very larg...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 16, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Drug Makers and Distributors Commandeered by Cops
Jeffrey A. SingerIn the latest episode of “Cops Practicing Medicine,” a floor vote is scheduled in the House of Representatives for H.R. 3878, sponsored by Rep. David McKinney, (R-WV). Under current law, drug makers and distributors are required to report to the Drug Enforcement Administration any suspicious orders for controlled substances. H.R. 3878 would also require them to perform “due diligence” on their suspicions, document and report their due diligence to the DEA, and refuse to fill the order if their suspicions are not resolved by the due diligence.This amounts to the DEA commandeerin...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 16, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Hepatitis C
is a recently discovered disease. Harvey J. Alter identified the variant form of Hepatitis during the 70s, which then became known as a ‘non-A, non-B Hepatitis (NANBH)’. In the 1980s, Michael Houghton and his team isolated the genome of the new virus, and it was named ‘Hepatitis C’. Finally, in 1997 Charles M. Rice proved that the virus is a disease agent, capable of acting alone to cause Hepatitis. This year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine has been jointly awarded to Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton, and Charles M. Rice for the discovery of the virus. Their contributions (illustrated below) have ...
Source: GIDEON blog - November 10, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Becoming resilient
Rehabilitation professions are about helping people recover from illness to return to what matters in life. Sometimes as I read the myriad social media posts on ways to help people with pain, I wonder what kind of life rehabilitation professionals live themselves. Does our focus on what’s done during rehabilitation represent the way people live in everyday life? I suspect that because rehabilitation has emerged from a medical model, much of our expectations and the framework for our work has remained in a “fix-it” or “there you go, good as new” mindset. A kind of short-term, out the door an...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - November 8, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Resilience/Health Science in practice adaptability evolution flexibility pain rehabilitation rehabilitation theory Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 9th 2020
In this study, young adult mice were submitted to endurance exercise training and the function, differentiation, and metabolic characteristics of satellite cells were investigated in vivo and in vitro. We found that injured muscles from endurance-exercised mice display improved regenerative capacity, demonstrated through higher densities of newly formed myofibres compared with controls (evidenced by an increase in embryonic myosin heavy chain expression), as well as lower inflammation (evidenced by quantifying CD68-marked macrophages), and reduced fibrosis. Enhanced myogenic function was accompanied by an increased ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Freezing a Moment in Time: Snapshots of Cryo-EM Research
To get a look at cell components that are too small to see with a normal light microscope, scientists often use cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). As the prefix cryo- means “cold” or “freezing,” cryo-EM involves rapidly freezing a cell, virus, molecular complex, or other structure to prevent water molecules from forming crystals. This preserves the sample in its natural state and keeps it still so that it can be imaged with an electron microscope, which uses beams of electrons instead of light. Some electrons are scattered by the sample, while others pass through it and through magnetic lenses to l...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - November 4, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Molecular Structures Tools and Techniques Cellular Imaging Cellular Processes Cool Tools/Techniques Cryo-Electron Microscopy Research Roundup Source Type: blogs

SENS Research Foundation 2020 Year End Fundraiser: Donate to Fund the Foundational Science Needed for New Rejuvenation Therapies
We live in the early, formative years of the era of rejuvenation, in which medicine will target the mechanisms of aging, increasingly effectively as the years pass, in order to make the old physiologically young once again. The first, crude rejuvenation therapies worthy of the name are under development or already available to the adventurous. These are senolytic treatments that selectively destroy the accumulated senescent cells that contribute to aging. Senescent cells produce chronic inflammation, tissue dysfunction, and age-related disease. By removing even just a third to a half of senescent cells in just some tissues...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 2nd 2020
In conclusion, the circulating antibody repertoire has increased binding to thousands of peptides in older donors, which can be represented as an immune age. Increased immune age is associated with autoimmune disease, acute inflammatory disease severity, and may be a broadly relevant biomarker of immune function in health, disease, and therapeutic intervention. The immune age has the potential for wide-spread use in clinical and consumer settings. In Vivo Reprogramming Improves Cognitive Function in Old Mice https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/in-vivo-reprogramming-improves-cognitive-function-in-old-mic...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 1, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

On neurons, lifelong learning, meditation, humility, “empty brain calories” and more
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring 12 fascinating neuroscience findings and open questions–and the beautiful image above. #1. “With this image I want to illustrate the large advances made in imaging methods over the past century, allowing modern neuroscientists to look at neurons in ways that Cajal could have only dreamed of.” – Silvia Rodriguez-Rozada, Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Hamburg. Award-winning image shows neuroimaging progress in a century #2. One more reason why lifelong learning matters: Study: High Cognitive Reserve (CR) seen to significantly...
Source: SharpBrains - October 30, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: SharpBrains Monthly eNewsletter awe behavior-therapy brain-enhancement cognitive-bias FDA humility Lifelong-learning medication meditation Memory-Training mental health mindfulness Neurons neuroscience supplements virtual-r Source Type: blogs

The FDA clears AppliedVR headset to help treat fibromyalgia and chronic pain
Conclusions: High engagement and satisfaction combined with low levels of adverse effects support the feasibility and acceptability of at-home skills-based VR for chronic pain. A significant reduction in pain outcomes over the course of the 21-day treatment both within the VR group and compared with an audio-only version suggests that VR has the potential to provide enhanced treatment and greater improvement across a range of pain outcomes. These findings provide a foundation for future research on VR behavioral interventions for chronic pain. News in Context: FDA clears MindMaze GO neurorehabilitation platform, easing a...
Source: SharpBrains - October 22, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation AppliedVR back pain Breakthrough Device Designation chronic pain EaseVRx FDA fibromyalgia virtual-reality Source Type: blogs

Early, tight control of Crohn ’s disease may have lasting benefits
The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a remarkable organ: it resides on the inside of our bodies, but is regularly in contact with the outside world by virtue of what we ingest. It is quite incredible that the immune cells of the GI tract are not activated more regularly by the many foreign products it encounters every day. Only when the GI tract encounters an intruder that risks causing disease do the immune cells of the GI tract spring into action. That is, of course, under normal circumstances. In people with Crohn’s disease, the normally tolerant immune cells of the GI tract are activated without provocation, and th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Flier, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs

Opioid Policymakers Keep Tilting at Windmills, Striking Patients in the Process
Jeffrey A. SingerThe American Psychological Association Dictionary of Psychologydefines“denial” as “adefense mechanism in which unpleasant thoughts, feelings, wishes, or events are ignored or excluded from conscious awareness. It may take such forms as refusal to acknowledge the reality of a terminal illness, a financial problem, an addiction, or a partner ’s infidelity…”Many policymakers, including many in Congress, remain in a state of denial about the true cause of the overdose crisis:drug prohibition.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ’s October...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 15, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Stress and the heart: Lessons from the pandemic
This study is a cautionary tale regarding the impact of stress. It serves as a good reminder that we should all strive to minimize stress, even in these trying times, and improve how we handle it. Some practical tips for managing stress including choosing healthy foods, exercising regularly, getting enough sleep, and staying connected with friends and family. The post Stress and the heart: Lessons from the pandemic appeared first on Harvard Health Blog. (Source: Harvard Health Blog)
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alyson Kelley-Hedgepeth, MD Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Heart Health Stress Source Type: blogs

Fibromyalgia: Exercise helps — here’s how to start
If you have fibromyalgia and you’re in pain, exercising is probably the last thing you feel like doing. But experts say it’s actually one of the most effective strategies you can try to help manage this chronic pain condition. Yet many people with fibromyalgia already struggle to get through their regular daily activities. Adding exercise on top of that may seem insurmountable. And pain and exhaustion can make it difficult to start and stick with regular workouts. Getting started It’s natural to worry that any exercise will make your pain worse and leave you wiped out. But know that adding more physical a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Exercise and Fitness Fatigue Health Neurological conditions Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 610
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 610:Brachylaima cribbi, a parasitic trematode found only in Australia to date.B. cribbi infects land snails and slugs as first/second intermediate hosts, and employs a wide range of mammals, reptiles, birds and amphibians as definitive hosts. Thefirst human infectionswere published in 1996 by Dr. Andrew Butcher, who also wrote an excellentreview on this parasite. Dr. Butcher recently passed away, and so I am dedicating this post to him and his important work. Humans become infected after ingesting undercooked snails. The main symptoms that have been reported with infection are ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 12, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Neurostimulation of Tongue Relieves Tinnitus Symptoms
Tinnitus, the sensation of ringing in the ears, is one of the most common medical conditions. Approximately 15% of the population suffers from it, but the nature of this malady makes it difficult to study and find therapeutic options. Now, a multinational collaboration of researchers has shown that a neurostimulation system made by Neuromod Devices Limited, an Irish company, can significantly reduce the symptoms of tinnitus. The technology is based on a finding that stimulating the trigeminal nerve, which scientists believe is related to the auditory system, seems to have an effect on tinnitus. Coupling this effect wit...
Source: Medgadget - October 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: ENT Neurology Source Type: blogs

Will AI-Based Automation Replace Basic Primary Care? Should It?
By KEN TERRY In a recent podcast about the future of telehealth, Lyle Berkowitz, MD, a technology consultant, entrepreneur, and professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, confidently predicted that, because of telehealth and clinical automation, “In 10-20 years, we won’t need primary care physicians [for routine care]. The remaining PCPs will specialize in caring for complicated patients. Other than that, if people need care, they’ll go to NPs or PAs or receive automated care with the help of AI.” Berkowitz isn’t the first to make this kind of predictio...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech AI Ken Terry primary care Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 5th 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 4, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs