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This Could Be The Worst Tick Season In Years. Here's What You Need To Know.
Tick season is upon us, and it’s shaping up to be a real doozy. Scientists predict 2017 will bear the highest number of ticks in recent years, with a jump in reported cases of tick-borne illnesses in some regions of the U.S. Ticks are thriving thanks to a recent explosion of the white-footed mice population, which carry Lyme disease, Powassan virus and other tick-borne illnesses. Meanwhile, warmer winters caused by climate change are allowing ticks to remain active longer and carry diseases into new regions of the U.S. Experts suggest people living in regions where these diseases are most prevalent ― the North...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

UMass Amherst tick testing lab joins national ecology tracking project
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) The LMZ at UMass Amherst earned a two-year, renewable contract for up to $112,000 per year to test several thousand ticks for six bacterial and one protozoan pathogen using DNA-based assays. UMass Amherst microbiology professor and LMZ director Stephen Rich says these tests will detect the pathogens that cause Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis and Babesiosis, among others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How ‘stealth warrior’ bacteria turn a tick’s gut microbes against itself
Before infecting humans, tick-borne bacteria or viruses first have to get past a tick ’s defenses to colonize it. How this occurs is not well understood. To investigate, Yale researchers studied a model of the second-most-common tick-borne infection in the United States, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, which can cause headaches, muscle pain, and even death. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - January 17, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

How 'stealth warrior' bacteria turn a tick's gut microbes against itself
(Yale University) Before infecting humans, tick-borne bacteria or viruses first have to get past a tick's defenses to colonize it. How this occurs is not well understood. To investigate, Yale researchers studied a model of the second-most-common tick-borne infection in the United States, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, which can cause headaches, muscle pain, and even death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

RECOMMENDATIONS AND REPORTS: Diagnosis and Management of Tickborne Rickettsial Diseases: Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Other Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses, Ehrlichioses, and Anaplasmosis — United States: A Practical Guide for Health Care and Public Health Professionals
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - May 13, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Healing, and Human Touch
Early this summer, I spent several days in a hospital bed, tethered to an IV, with what proved in retrospect to be anaplasmosis (a nasty bit of tick-borne business), complicated by viral meningitis. The latter was likely due to the immunosuppression of the primary infection. It was all rather unpleasant. Among other things, I had a constant, moderate headache punctuated by crushing head pain- easily, the worst headaches I've ever experienced. I was given narcotics when the pain was at its worst, and they didn't do much for me, despite their two distinct advantages. The first is that these drugs are genuinely effective at t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ticks can transmit a new Lyme-like disease
There are several good reasons to keep ticks off your body. One is that they are creepy and suck your blood. Another is that they can transmit 14 different diseases—not just Lyme disease. A report published online this week in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine describes the newest tick-borne disease in North America, which is caused by a bacterium known as Borrelia miyamotoi. The microbe was first identified in Japan in 1995. The first report of it infecting humans came from Russia in 2011. Cases began appearing in the northeastern United States in 2013. Borrelia miyamotoi is a spiral-shaped bacterium that is r...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - June 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Howard LeWine, M.D. Tags: Health Prevention Borrelia miyamotoi Lyme disease ticks Source Type: news

The List Of Tick-Transmitted Diseases Is Growing
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lyme disease makes the headlines but there are plenty of additional reasons to avoid tick bites. New research highlights the latest in a growing list of tick-borne threats — a distant relative of Lyme that's easy to confuse with other illnesses. Monday's study suggests a kind of bacteria with an unwieldy name — Borrelia miyamotoi — should be on the radar when people in Lyme-endemic areas get otherwise unexplained summertime fevers. It's one of several recently discovered diseases linked to ticks in different parts of the country, a reminder to get tick-savvy no matter where you li...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

“Orange” You Glad You Checked the Buffy Coat?
The incidence of tick-borne human infectious syndromes has dramatically risen in the last 2 decades, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The importance of a rapid and accurate diagnosis to distinguish anaplasmosis from other febrile illnesses is paramount for the prompt administration of appropriate antibiotics and is imperative for the successful treatment of the tick-borne infections. We summarize the current literature describing the biology, clinical presentation, and epidemiology of human granulocytic anaplasmosis. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 14, 2015 Category: Microbiology Authors: Joseph D. Cooper, Dan Dometita, Anjum Hasan, Patrick Dorion, Donna M. Wolk, Raquel M. Martinez Source Type: news

Small, fast, and crowded: Mammal traits amplify tick-borne illness
In the U.S., some 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease annually. Thousands also suffer from babesiosis and anaplasmosis, tick-borne ailments that can occur alone or as co-infections with Lyme disease. In our struggle to manage the ever-growing list of tick-borne diseases, we need to understand which animals magnify human disease risk. New results suggest when generalist pathogens emerge, small mammals with large populations and a fast pace of life warrant careful monitoring. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers take steps toward development of a vaccine against tick-transmitted disease
(Virginia Commonwealth University) Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers have made an important advancement toward developing a vaccine against the debilitating and potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 29, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Harsh Winter Does Little To Ease Lyme Disease Woes
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The harsh winter did nothing to cull the nationwide tick population, and health officials are primed for a warm season that could see the number of Lyme disease cases rise. In northern New England, the increase in cases of Lyme correlates with a growing population of deer ticks, which transmit the disease, state epidemiologist Stephen Sears said. In Maine and elsewhere, heavy snow acted as an insulating blanket that protected ticks from winter’s cold, state entomologist Charlene Donahue said. Nationwide, the number of cases of Lyme disease has held relatively steady over the past few year...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 11, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kckatzman Tags: Health Local News CBS Boston LYME DISEASE ticks WBZ Source Type: news

How Do Tick-Borne Diseases Evade The Tick's Immune System?
Ticks, blood-sucking arthropods that occur across the world, can transmit viruses, bacteria, and protozoa that threaten the health of their vertebrate hosts. Dangerous diseases transmitted by ticks include Lyme disease, which attacks humans in Europe and the USA and is caused by Borrellia bacteria; babesiosis, caused by the protozoan Babesia (a relative of the malaria parasite) that infects pets, cattle, and sometimes humans; and anaplasmosis, caused by the Anaplasma bacterium, which can have serious effects on cattle... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

Encephalitis In New York State And Black-Legged Ticks Linked
The number of tick-borne illnesses reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the rise. Lyme disease leads the pack, with some 35,000 cases reported annually. In the Northeast, the black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) that spread Lyme disease also infect people with other maladies, among them anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and - as a new paper in the journal Parasites and Vectors reports - Powassan encephalitis. Powassan encephalitis is caused by Powassan virus and its variant, deer tick virus... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news