Lyme Disease Found In More Than A Third Of Maine Deer Ticks

ORONO, Maine (AP) — More than a third of the deer ticks submitted to a Maine lab last year tested positive for Lyme disease, a surveillance report from the lab said. The report is from the University of Maine Tick Lab. The lab found that a smaller percentage of ticks tested positive for anaplasmosis and babesiosis, which are other tick-borne diseases. The tick lab’s manager, Griffin Dill, said the information will help authorities learn how fast the ticks are spreading in the state. The study is the first of its kind in Maine, the Bangor Daily news reported. The report found that just shy of 39% of deer ticks tested positive for Lyme. The data also show ticks were more frequently found higher on the bodies of children than adults. Lyme disease can cause symptoms such as neck stiffness, joint pain and irregular heartbeat. (© Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Deer Ticks LYME DISEASE Maine news Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 23 September 2020Source: Anaesthesia Critical Care &Pain MedicineAuthor(s): Vincent Laudenbach, Aude Charollais, Sophie Radi, Marie-Hélène Stumpf, Anne Vincent, Ingrid Kaltwasser, Tiphaine Tomczyk, Jacques Benichou, Philippe Leroux, Stéphane Marret
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: SO remains a threatening clinical diagnosis that poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. It can be triggered post-traumatic, but also any intraocular surgery. This should be taken into account when assessing the indication for intraocular eye surgery, especially in eyes with reduced visual outcome. PMID: 32967030 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Klinische Monatsblatter fur Augenheilkunde - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Klin Monbl Augenheilkd Source Type: research
Abstract The case involved a man in his forties. While working at the restaurant that the patient runs, the patient experienced a stab-like pain on the left shoulder and developed systemic pruritic eruptions. He was diagnosed with anaphylaxis upon visiting our emergency department. Conjunctival hyperemia, lip swelling, cold sweats, and nausea presented later. A cap fluorescence enzyme immunoassay using the serum of the patient showed specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) positivity for wasps; therefore, we hypothesized that he had anaphylaxis caused by the insect's sting. Insects of the same species as that by which the...
Source: Arerugi - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Arerugi Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that Cernilen-flogo® treatment after PVP is effective and minimize patient's pelvic discomfort showed by lower VAS level resulting in better postoperatively patient's quality of life (QOL). PMID: 32965002 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Serum level of miR-492 remarkably increases in the acute phase of AMI, which may be used as an effective biomarker for diagnosing AMI. PMID: 32964994 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The modified single-incision thoracoscopic Nuss procedure is both safe and effective for pectus excavatum correction with non-recurrence after two years. PMID: 32964990 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
Authors: Di Paolo C, Papi P, Falisi G, Pompa G, Santilli V, Polimeni A, Fiorini A Abstract OBJECTIVE: The possible relationship between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and body posture is still controversial. Rasterstereography has been introduced as a radiation-free, reliable and non-invasive method to analyze three-dimensional spinal posture. The aim of this case-control study is to evaluate, through rasterstereography, body posture parameters in a group of patients with reducible unilateral dislocation of the articular disc, compared to healthy volunteers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Rasterstereographic recordi...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
Authors: Ishikura M, Endo A, Sakamoto T, Tanabe J, Okazaki K, Ouch T, Watanabe N, Tanabe K Abstract A 19-year-old-man was admitted to our hospital with intermittent chest pain. The day before admission, he had been diagnosed with enteritis and prescribed clarithromycin. He had experienced severe chest pain three times after taking clarithromycin; thus, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was suspected. Emergent coronary angiography showed normal coronary arteries; however, the result of a subsequent acetylcholine provocation test was positive. We diagnosed him to have ACS caused by coronary vasospasms and suspected clari...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Peñailillo, L, Aedo, C, Cartagena, M, Contreras, A, Reyes, A, Ramirez-Campillo, R, Earp, JE, and Zbinden-Foncea, H. Effects of eccentric cycling performed at long vs. short muscle lengths on heart rate, rate perceived effort, and muscle damage markers. J Strength Cond Res 34(10): 2895–2902, 2020—It is possible that the magnitude of muscle damage in eccentric cycling is dependent on seat position that could affect the muscle length changes during eccentric contractions. However, no previous study has investigated the effect of seat position on muscle damage and metabolic demand in eccentric exercise. Thus...
Source: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
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