Acetazolamide Helps Treat Volume Overload in Heart Failure
MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2022 -- For patients with acute decompensated heart failure, the addition of acetazolamide to loop diuretic therapy yields an increased incidence of successful decongestion, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the New... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 29, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

ADVOR Backs Add-On Acetazolamide for Cutting Congestion in Decompensated HF
(MedPage Today) -- BARCELONA -- The addition of IV acetazolamide to loop diuretic therapy led to a greater incidence of successful early decongestion in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF), according to the ADVOR trial. The... (Source: MedPage Today Nephrology)
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - August 27, 2022 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Diamox Tablets and Injection (Acetazolamide Tablets and Injection) - new on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - June 1, 2022 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

How Common Are Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks After Minor Head Trauma?
Discussion Basilar skulls fractures are relatively common occurring in 4-20% of all skull fractures. Motor vehicle accidents, significant falls from heights and blunt trauma are the most common causes of basilar skull fractures. Basilar skulls fractures are even less common in children than adults. Complications can include meningitis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, cranial nerve injuries or even potentially death. With more significant trauma to the head and body, it is not surprising that complications are more likely. Nasoethmoid facial fractures have similar common mechanisms of injury including motor vehicle accid...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 15, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Half-Dose of Mountain Sickness Med Acetazolamide Works as Well as Full Dose
THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 -- A lower dose of a medication to prevent acute mountain sickness is as effective as the standard, higher dose, a new study finds. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) can cause headaches, gastrointestinal upset, fatigue,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Half-Dose of Mountain Sickness Med, Acetazolamide, Works as Well as Full Dose
THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 -- A lower dose of a medication to prevent acute mountain sickness is as effective as the standard, higher dose, a new study finds. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) can cause headaches, gastrointestinal upset, fatigue,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cutting the standard dose of medication for acute mountain sickness in half does not reduce its effectiveness
(Elsevier) A new study published in Wilderness& Environmental Medicine demonstrated that trekkers and climbers taking a lower dose of acetazolamide (62.5 mg twice daily) were no more likely to develop acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms than those who took twice that amount, which is the standard prophylactic dose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Diamox (acetazolamide)
Title: Diamox (acetazolamide)Category: MedicationsCreated: 3/2/2005 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/4/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - March 4, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Diamox Sequels (Acetazolamide XR) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - January 11, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Altitude sickness drug helps man, 48, lose 9.7lbs and overcome his fizzy drink addiction
The obese 48-year-old, from New York, would drink up to eight sugary sodas a day, which made up a staggering 42 per cent of his daily calorie intake. He was prescribed acetazolamide. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Managing the Toxic Chemical Release that Occurs During a Crush Injury
Conclusion Remember, crush injuries are a different form of trauma that require a very different mindset and approach to patient care. Local physiologic deterioration can begin very quickly, but systemic effects aren’t seen until the external pressure on the extremity or body part is released. The presentation of crush injuries can also be very clandestine, as in automobile accidents, due to local or central sensory neurological interruption and damage. Therefore, it’s essential to insist upon earliest possible access to the patient to assess the possible/probable extent of any crush injury and prepare/monitor the pati...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - October 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew Parrish, MD, EMT-P Tags: Trauma Exclusive Articles Source Type: news

Acetazolamide Injection (Acetazolamide Injection) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - February 15, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

What Clinical Signs Can Be Associated With Benign External Hydrocephalus?
Discussion Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the ventricles and/or subarachnoid spaces. External hydrocephalus is a communicating hydrocephalus often defined as the patient having a rapidly enlarging head circumference (HC) and enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces especially over the frontal lobes with normal or moderately enlarged ventricles. Benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) is a self-limited external hydrocephalus that occurs during infancy and resolves spontaneously in childhood, usually by age 2 years, that is felt to not cause significant problems. It was first described by...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - October 2, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

At What Height Do You Consider Preventative Treatment for Acute Mountain Sickness?
Discussion Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a well-known problem for some people who travel to high altitude, especially altitudes > 2500 m (~8200 feet). Symptoms include headache, nausea or emesis, shortness of breath, dizziness, fatigue, difficulty sleeping and poor appetite. The incidence in adults ranges from 25% at 2975 m to up to 75% at 5896 m. The incidence in children is less clear but it appears that children are more susceptible at 45% for 16-19 year olds for similar altitudes. Risk factors are numerous including age, gender, obesity, ascent rate, altitude for sleeping, previous exposure to high altitude, prev...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 21, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Diamox, Diamox Sequels (acetazolamide)
Title: Diamox, Diamox Sequels (acetazolamide)Category: MedicationsCreated: 3/2/2005 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/7/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - November 7, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news