Shadow equalities minister pledges equalisation of hate crime law

Taiwo Owatemi MP, the shadow minister for women and equalities, and herself a UNISON member, spoke to the union’s LGBT+ conference virtually this afternoon (pictured), taking the opportunity to announce that a future Labour government would equalise hate-crime legislation to ensure that all such crimes see sentencing affected by the motive. The trained pharmacist whose worked in the NHS, thanked UNISON members for all they’ve done during the pandemic. And she looked back at the important role played by trade unions organising for LGBT+ equality. However, she stressed that there is still inequality. For example, Ms Owatemi cited research has shown that it is more difficult for LGBT+ people to take time off work for family-related issues, while public services that are ‘lifelines’ to LGBT+ – such as advice lines, HIV/Aids testing, LGBT+ youth workers and more – are being cut by the government. In a Q&A session, she also reiterated her faith in the parliamentary system, noting that the faults of the present government do not mean that it is an inherently bad system. In debates today, Neil Adams, speaking on behalf of the disabled caucus, introduced a motion stressing that working from home can be a reasonable adjustment. Graeme Ellis from the national disabled members’ committee noted: “It is important that the right to work from home is properly funded.” And he highlighted how general secretary Christina McAnea had helped to...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Article News 2021 National LGBT Conference equalities LGBT members Source Type: news

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By The Editorial Team, IntraHealth International Chemutai, a health worker at the Kaproron Health Center IV in Kween District, Uganda, stands in the operating room for maternal care, which officially opened in May 2020. Photo by Esther Ruth Mbabazi for IntraHealth International.December 21, 2021COVID-19 dominated the news cycle this year. The first large-scale global pandemic in 100 years has now killed more than5 million peopleworldwide since it began in 2020. Over 275 million people have been diagnosed with it. And at least115,000 health workers have lost their lives to the virus, though the number is likely muc...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: HIV & AIDS COVID-19 Maternal, Newborn, Child Health Mental Health Noncommunicable Diseases 2021 Year of the Health and Care Worker Health Workforce Systems Health Workers Source Type: news
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Source: AIDS Research and Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Girls at Malual Agai School in South Sudan are having a lesson about menstrual hygiene. The school is one of the beneficiaries from Multi-Year Resilience Programme (MYRP) funded by Education Cannot Wait (ECW). The fund aims to keep girls at school by supporting them and providing them with dignity kits. Credit: ECWBy Charlton DokiJuba, South Sudan, Nov 10 2021 (IPS) Ayom Wol sits under a tree in South Sudan in the scorching midday sun. He is a newly-trained teacher, preparing for tomorrow’s lessons. His school principal says he has to prepare while at school because there is no electricity at home. The 29-year-old Wo...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa COVID-19 Development & Aid Education Education Cannot Wait. Future of Education is here Featured Gender Headlines Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations ​ #EducationCannotWait​ #EducationInEmergencies​ Source Type: news
a Ielpo The pandemic emergency of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) shed light on the need for innovative aids, devices, and assistive technologies to enable people with severe disabilities to live their daily lives. EEG-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) can lead individuals with significant health challenges to improve their independence, facilitate participation in activities, thus enhancing overall well-being and preventing impairments. This systematic review provides state-of-the-art applications of EEG-based BCIs, particularly those using motor-imagery (MI) data, to wheelchair control and movement. It p...
Source: Sensors - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Yasmine Sherif in Lebanon with Palestine refugee children. Credit: Education Cannot Wait (ECW)By Nayema NusratNEW YORK, Jun 19 2021 (IPS) With financing, the number of out-of-school refuges could be reduced to zero, Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot Wait (ECW) says, as the world commemorates World Refugee Day. In a wide-ranging exclusive interview with IPS in New York, Sherif shared her vision for a world where dignity and the right to believe in better prospects are returned child refugees – something, she says, can be delivered through education. “When you sit down and listen to young refugees in ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Climate Change Education Education Cannot Wait. Future of Education is here Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Trade & I Source Type: news
Health and safety “might not grab the headlines … but that work is vital”. Opening the weekend’s virtual conference for UNISON’s water, environment and transport service group (WET), Ruth Davies (pictured above), the chair of the service group executive, paid tribute to the members who have helped keep the country going in the pandemic. The virus has had a “devastating impact”, she noted. It has been like “nothing we’ve experienced before, and safety has had to be paramount”. But Ms Davies said that it was a “demonstration of the strength of our union and o...
Source: UNISON Health care news - Category: UK Health Authors: Tags: Article News 2021 Special WET Conference Source Type: news
When Ghenya Grondin starts rattling off the symptoms she still experiences a year after getting sick with what she believes was COVID-19, she has to pause to consult a list she keeps on her phone for occasions like this one. Exhaustion. Fevers. Headaches. Body aches. Chest pain and shortness of breath. Nausea and gastrointestinal problems. Dry eyes. Brain fog and memory loss—hence her need for a digital list, which goes on and on. While Grondin’s physical symptoms are bad enough to keep her mostly homebound and unable to do her work as a postpartum doula, the constant mental fogginess has hit her hard emotional...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Labour Poverty & SDGs Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
More than three decades after the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the first World AIDS Day on Dec. 1, 1988, the world’s leading global health organization faces another public health crisis in COVID-19. On this World AIDS Day, those who raised awareness of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, find devastating similarities and haunting differences in America’s response to both crises. In 1981, scientists recorded the first cases of a rare pneumonia, usually found among immunosuppressed patients, among a group of gay men in Los Angeles, and noticed more cases appearing among gay men in San Francisco and New ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature HIV/AIDS Source Type: news
Kayla Brim laughed when she learned it could take 10 days to get her COVID-19 test results back. “I thought, ‘Okay, well, within 10 days I should be fine,’” she remembers. That was on July 2. More than a month later, Brim is still far from fine. Prior to the pandemic, the 28-year-old from Caldwell, Idaho, juggled homeschooling her two kids with her work as a makeup artist—she was supposed to open her own salon in July. Now, she suffers daily from shortness of breath, exhaustion, excruciating headaches, brain fog, neuropathy, high blood pressure and loss of taste and smell. She feels like &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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