Researchers ‘shocked’ to find Egyptian mummy was a pregnant woman

Archaeologists studying Warsaw ’s national collection of mummies expected to uncover a male priestPolish researchers examining an ancient Egyptian mummy that they expected to be a male priest were surprised when X-rays and computer tests revealed instead that it was a mummy of a woman who had been seven months pregnant.The researchers said on Thursday it was the world ’s first known case of such a well-preserved ancient mummy of a pregnant woman.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Archaeology Poland Egypt Egyptology World news Science Source Type: news

Related Links:

Since the first Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancer’s results were published, people have become more aware of the risks associated with prenatal exposure from diagnostic x rays. As a result, it has since been the subject of many studies. In this review, the results of recent epidemiological studies are summarized. The current international guidelines for diagnostic x-ray examinations were compared to the review. All epidemiological studies starting from 2007 and all relevant international guidelines were included. Apart from one study that involved rhabdomyosarcoma, no statistically significant associations were found...
Source: Health Physics - Category: Radiology Tags: REVIEW PAPERS Source Type: research
This study aimed to compare the dose and noise level of four tube voltages in abdominal computerized tomography (CT) examinations in different abdominal circumference sizes of pregnant women. Fetal radiation doses were measured with two anthropomorphic pregnant phantoms and real-time dosimeters of photoluminescence sensors using four tube voltages for abdominal CT. The noise level was measured at the abdomen of two anthropomorphic pregnant phantoms. In the large pregnant phantom, the mean fetal doses performed using 120 and 135 kV were statistically significantly lower than the lower tube voltages (P 
Source: Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics - Category: Physics Authors: Tags: J Appl Clin Med Phys Source Type: research
Ndiabou Niang was able to get access to prenatal care after her town’s mayor decided to finance the health membership of nearly 300 women and children. Courtesy: Réseau Siggil JigéenBy Neena BhandariSYDNEY, Australia, Jul 14 2020 (IPS) Pregnant with her second child, 30-year-old Ndiabou Niang was enduring pelvic pain, but couldn’t afford to access prenatal care in Diabe Salla, a village on the outskirts of the small town of Thilogne in north-east Senegal. Her husband was unemployed and her earnings of under CFAF 10,000 (17 USD) from selling seasonal fruits in the local market were insufficient to ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Gender Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Senegal Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) Women Deliver Source Type: news
Conclusion: This case report highlights two key points. Luckenschadel should be kept in mind when Chiari II malformation is diagnosed. Autopsy with radiographic assessment is very useful in revealing this congenital defect which may escape prenatal detection. PMID: 32096430 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Fetal and Pediatric Pathology - Category: Pathology Tags: Fetal Pediatr Pathol Source Type: research
ConclusionIn such cases, whenever the conventional imaging modalities like the X-rays such as intra oral peri-apical views and orthopantomograms are unavailable, or where use of ionizing radiation is a grave concern (especially in children and pregnant patients), ultrasonography offers a non-invasive diagnostic imaging method which helps in diagnosis of the condition and also helps in supplementing the clinical information, thereby helping in better understanding of the underlying condition.
Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA, MD Slumdog TB No one knows who gave Rahul Roy tuberculosis. Roy’s charmed life as a successful trader involved traveling in his Mercedes C class between his apartment on the plush Nepean Sea Road in South Mumbai and offices in Bombay Stock Exchange. He cared little for Mumbai’s weather. He seldom rolled down his car windows – his ambient atmosphere, optimized for his comfort, rarely changed. Historically TB, or “consumption” as it was known, was a Bohemian malady; the chronic suffering produced a rhapsody which produced fine art. TB was fashionable in Victorian Britain...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Saurabh Jha TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs
By AMEYA KULKARNI, MD When Samuel Morse left his New Haven home to paint a portrait of the Maquis du Lafayette in Washington DC, it was the last time he would see his pregnant wife. Shortly after his arrival in Washington, his wife developed complications during childbirth. A messenger took several days on horseback to relay the message to Mr Morse. Because the trip back to New Haven took several more, his wife had died by the time he arrived at their home.  So moved was he by the tragedy of lost time that he dedicated the majority of the rest of his life to make sure that this would never happen to anyone again. H...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Medical Practice Ameya Kulkarni Global Health Maternal mortality public health Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: Reproductive ToxicologyAuthor(s): Kai Craenen, Mieke Verslegers, Livine Craeghs, Roel Quintens, Ann Janssen, Amelie Coolkens, Sarah Baatout, Lieve Moons, Mohammed Abderrafi BenotmaneAbstractRecent studies highlighted a link between ionizing radiation exposure during neurulation and birth defects such as microphthalmos and anophthalmos. Because the mechanisms underlying these defects remain largely unexplored, we irradiated pregnant C57BL/6J mice (1.0 Gy, X-rays) at embryonic day (E)7.5, followed by histological and gene/protein expression analyses at defined days. I...
Source: Reproductive Toxicology - Category: Toxicology Source Type: research
Specially trained beagles could one day detect mesothelioma by scent, according to the lead researcher of a recent study detailing the dog breed’s stunning accuracy with lung cancer. Dr. Thomas Quinn, clinical professor at the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, believes the dogs could be equally effective with pleural mesothelioma, a rare cancer caused by asbestos exposure. “Absolutely, this could work with mesothelioma. There is no reason why it wouldn’t,” Quinn told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “That is another cancer with strong potential for this to work well.” Th...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Abstract BACKGROUND: Pediatric anesthesiologists are exposed to ionizing radiation from x-rays on an almost daily basis. Our goal was to determine the culture of safety in which they work and how they adhere to preventative strategies that minimize exposure risk in their daily practice. METHODS: After Institutional Review Board waiver and approval of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia's research and quality and safety committees, an electronic e-mail questionnaire was sent to the Society's physician, nontrainee members and consisted of questions specific to provider use of protective lead shielding, the rou...
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
More News: Computers | Egypt Health | Poland Health | Pregnancy | Science | X-Ray