Coronapod: Why COVID antibody treatments may not be the answer

In the early days of the pandemic, researchers raced to identify the most potent antibodies produced by the immune system in response to SAR-COV-2 infection and produce them in bulk. The resulting ‘monoclonal antibodies’ have since been tested in a variety of settings as treatments for COVID-19.But despite promising clinical trial results and several therapies having already been approved, antibody therapies have not yet played a large role in the fight against COVID-19. In this episode of Coronapod, we ask why.News: COVID antibody treatments show promise for preventing severe diseaseNews: Antibody therapies could be a bridge to a coronavirus vaccine — but will the world benefit?Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Source: Nature Podcast - Category: Science Authors: Source Type: podcasts

Related Links:

This blog is closed. You can catch up with all our coverage of the pandemichere.11.51pmBSTHere ’s a roundup of the latest developments:11.30pmBSTMexico ’s health ministry reported 6,506 new confirmed cases of Covid-19 in the country and 245 more fatalities, bringing its total to 2,861,498 infections and 241,279 deaths.The government has said the real number of cases is likely significantly higher, and separate data published recently suggested the actual death toll is at least 60% above the confirmed figure, Reuters reports.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news
The narrative of a dangerously ignorant minority may appeal, but it is not good for democracyThe Covid-19 pandemic was the perfect disaster for our cultural moment, because it made other people being wrong on the internet a matter of life and death.My use of the past tense here is aspirational. The emergence of the more contagious Delta variant threatens to undo a lot of progress – particularly here in the US, where active cases of coronavirus infection are up 149% from two weeks ago. Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that fully vaccinated people return towearing masks indoors in p...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases US news US politics Vaccines and immunisation Society World news Science Health Source Type: news
MONDAY, Aug. 2, 2021 -- More " pain and suffering " is coming as coronavirus cases climb in the United States, Dr. Anthony Fauci warned Sunday, but additional lockdowns are unlikely because enough Americans are now vaccinated to avoid the level of...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Getting the kids ready to go back to school each fall is stressful enough in a normal year, never mind in the midst of a pandemic. Between the more transmissible Delta coronavirus variant, rising cases across the country and new masking guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there’s a lot for parents to navigate as they plan for schools to reopen this August and September. On the whole, experts seem to agree it’s time to get kids back into their classrooms. Remote learning set many children—especially students of color—back academically, cut them off from essential ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
ABSTRACTThe COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, has triggered a worldwide health emergency. Here, we show that ferritin-like Dps from hyperthermophilicSulfolobus islandicus, covalently coupled with SARS-CoV-2 antigens via the SpyCatcher system, forms stable multivalent dodecameric vaccine nanoparticles that remain intact even after lyophilisation. Immunisation experiments in mice demonstrated that the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) coupled to Dps (RBD-S-Dps) elicited a higher antibody titre and an enhanced neutralising antibody response compared to monomeric RBD. A single immunisation with RB...
Source: FEBS Letters - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: RESEARCH LETTER Source Type: research
If Britain really wants to keep everyone safe, we should be worrying about the lack of supplies to poorer nationsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverage“I was thinking this morning that it is a bit like a race,” Sajid Javidsaid last Wednesday when commenting on Britain ’s vaccine rollout. “The older adults have done their bit. Now we need them to help us start winning in that race. We have passed the baton to younger people, and are saying: ‘Please help us.’”It seems the health secretary would have you believe young people are now solely responsible for t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Science UK news Young people Vaccines and immunisation Health Global development Source Type: news
AbstractCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new species of β-coronavirus genus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The COVID-19 pandemic, which started in late 2019 and continues as at mid-2021, has caused enormous damage to health and lives globally. The urgent public health need has led to the development of vaccines against COVID-19 i n record-breaking time. The COVID-19 vaccines have been widely rolled out for the masses by many countries following approval for emergency use by the World Health Organization and regulatory agencies in many countries. In additi...
Source: Drugs and Therapy Perspectives - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was a pandemic.1 Since then, the disease has reached a 1% to 3% estimated overall mortality rate.2 COVID-19 severity ranges from asymptomatic to acute respiratory distress syndrome and possible death due to multiorgan failure.2 Therefore, to ameliorate the resultant poor health and social and economic consequences, prophylactic vaccines were developed. On December 11, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued the first emergency use authorization of Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA vaccine (BNT162b2) for COVID-19 prevention.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
ConclusionA better understanding of S protein features, structure and mutations facilitate the recognition of the importance of SARS-CoV-2 S protein in viral infection, as well as the development of therapies and vaccines. The efficacy and safety of these therapeutic compounds and vaccines are still controversial. However, they may potentially reduce or prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection, leading to a significant reduction of the global health burden of this pandemic.
Source: Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Latest updates:UK reports 65 further deaths;US chief medical adviser says US won ’t return to lockdowns despite rising Delta threatNHS in England urged to redistribute near-expiry vaccines as take-up slows among youngUber and Deliveroo discounts to lure young in England to get jabbedHerd immunity: could Covid be on the run in the UK?Florida records largest one-day case total since start of pandemicAustralian Sky News banned from YouTube for seven days over Covid disinformation11.39pmBST11.29pmBSTMexico ’shealth ministry has reported 6,740 new confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 128 more fatalities, Reuters reports....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases World news UK news Boris Johnson Source Type: news
More News: Clinical Trials | Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Pandemics | Podcasts | Science | Vaccines