Monitoring early stage lung disease in cystic fibrosis

Purpose of review Early stage lung disease has long been synonymous with infancy and childhood. As diagnosis happens earlier and conventional management improves, we are seeing larger proportions of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) in adolescence and even adulthood with well preserved lung health. The availability of highly effective cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulator drugs for a large proportion of the CF population will impact even further. Transitioning into adult care with ‘normal’ lung function will become more common. However, it is crucial that we are not blasé about this phase, which sets the scene for future lung health. It is well recognized that lung function assessed by spirometry is insensitive to ‘early’ changes occurring in the distal, small airways. Much of our learning has come from studies in infants and young children, which have allowed assessment and optimization of alternative forms of monitoring. Recent findings Here, as a group of paediatric and adult CF specialists, we review the evidence base for sensitive physiological testing based on multibreath washout, lung imaging, exercise and activity monitoring, assessment of infection and quality of life measures. Summary We seek to emphasise the importance of further work in these areas, as outcome measures become widely applicable to a growing CF population.
Source: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: CYSTIC FIBROSIS: Edited by Peter J. Barry and Barry J. Plant Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Anti-staphylococcal antibiotic prophylaxis may lead to fewer children having isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, when commenced early in infancy and continued up to six years of age. The clinical importance of this finding is uncertain. Further research may establish whether the trend towards more children with CF with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after four to six years of prophylaxis, is a chance finding and whether choice of antibiotic or duration of treatment might influence this. PMID: 32997797 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Infant pulmonary function testing using the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression (RVRTC) technique requires sedation and is time consuming. Many cystic fibrosis (CF) centers do not have access to equipment and the utility of routine testing remains to be determined. We aimed to assess whether RVRTC tests performed during infancy predict spirometry at early school age.
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Short communication Source Type: research
Annals of the American Thoracic Society,Volume 17, Issue 9, Page 1085-1093, September 2020.
Source: Annals of the American Thoracic Society - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Patients with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory conditions have their lung function frequently monitored for routine care. Although the use of patient-initiated home spirometry was reported as early as 1982, its utilization has not been generalized [1]. Lack of low-cost, accurate devices, and lack of reimbursement for coaching, and data review hindered the generalization of its use.
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Introduction: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized with chronic inflammation with neutrophil and related cytokines in airway secretions. We aimed to measure the levels of neutrophil related inflammatory markers as nitric oxide, IL-8, IL-17, leukotriene B4 and neutrophil elastase as well as e-cadherin in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and to determine their relation with clinical findings. Methods: We consecutively enrolled cystic fibrosis patients into our clinics between the age of six and eighteen years who could cooperate for exhaled breath condensate to this case-control study (n  = 30). The age and ...
Source: Journal of Breath Research - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
ald F Abstract The use of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) has been widely described in airway diseases like asthma and cystic fibrosis, but for children's interstitial lung disease (chILD), which encompasses a broad spectrum of pathologies, the usefulness of PFTs is still undetermined, despite widespread use in adult interstitial lung disease. A literature review was initiated by the COST/Enter chILD working group aiming to describe published studies, to identify gaps in knowledge and to propose future research goals in regard to spirometry, whole-body plethysmography, infant and pre-school PFTs, measurement of di...
Source: Respiratory Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Eur Respir Rev Source Type: research
The use of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) has been widely described in airway diseases like asthma and cystic fibrosis, but for children's interstitial lung disease (chILD), which encompasses a broad spectrum of pathologies, the usefulness of PFTs is still undetermined, despite widespread use in adult interstitial lung disease. A literature review was initiated by the COST/Enter chILD working group aiming to describe published studies, to identify gaps in knowledge and to propose future research goals in regard to spirometry, whole-body plethysmography, infant and pre-school PFTs, measurement of diffusing capacity, multi...
Source: European Respiratory Review - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Lung biology and experimental studies, Interstitial and orphan lung disease Reviews Source Type: research
Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease affects the small airways even early in life and is characterized by progressive, irreversible changes due to recurrent, multi-pathogenic infections and inflammation that may take place in absence of symptoms [1 –3]. In school-age children, CF lung disease is conventionally monitored by the forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1) assessed by spirometry [4]. However, many children with CF and an abnormal lung clearance index (LCI) assessed by multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) show a normal FEV1 [5].
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
The PROSPECT study, a post-approval observational study in the U.S., showed no significant changes in lung function as measured by spirometry with clinical initiation of lumacaftor/ivacaftor. A sub-study within the PROSPECT study assessed the lung clearance index (LCI), as measured by multiple breath washout (MBW), a measure of lung function demonstrated to be sensitive among people with normal spirometry. Participants performed MBW prior to clinically initiating lumacaftor/ivacaftor therapy and for one year of follow-up.
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Posters Source Type: research
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