No Change in Risk for Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonellosis from Beef, United States, 2002-2010.

No Change in Risk for Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonellosis from Beef, United States, 2002-2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2020 Sep;26(9):2108-2117 Authors: Costard S, Pouzou JG, Belk KE, Morley PS, Schmidt JW, Wheeler TL, Arthur TM, Zagmutt FJ Abstract Restricting antibiotic use in food production animals is a target for reducing antimicrobial drug-resistant infections in humans. We used US surveillance data to estimate the probability of antibiotic-resistant nontyphoidal salmonellosis per meal made with beef during 2002-2010. Applying data for nontyphoidal Salmonella in raised-without-antibiotics cattle, we tested the effect of removing antibiotic use from all beef cattle production. We found an average of 1.2 (95% credible interval 0.6-4.2) antibiotic-resistant nontyphoidal salmonellosis cases per 1 million beef meals made with beef initially contaminated with antibiotic-resistant nontyphoidal Salmonella at slaughter or retail and 0.031 (95% credible interval 0.00018-0.14) cases per 1 million meals irrespective of beef contamination status. Neither outcome showed sustained change except for increases in 2003 and 2009 (>98% confidence) when larger or more outbreaks occurred. Switching all beef production to a raised-without-antibiotics system may not have a significant effect on antibiotic-resistant nontyphoidal salmonellosis (94.3% confidence). PMID: 32818395 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Emerg Infect Dis Source Type: research

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