Sperm Extraction in Obstructive Azoospermia

For men with obstructive azoospermia, several surgical sperm retrieval techniques can facilitate conception with assisted reproductive technology. The evolution of both percutaneous and open approaches to sperm retrieval has been affected by technological innovations, including the surgical microscope, in  vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Further modifications to these procedures are designed to minimize patient morbidity and increase the quality and quantity of sperm samples. Innovative technologies promise to further ameliorate outcomes by selecting the highest quality sp erm. Although various approaches to surgical sperm retrieval are now well established, several advancements in sperm selection and optimization are being developed.
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research

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We report the following outcomes: (1) live birth rates in AID and IVF-D treatment for couples with severe male infertility factors and prior ICSI failures; (2) paternal impact on embryo development of the same oocyte cohort; (3) prognostic factors in obtaining a live birth with donor semen.ResultsOf 92 women with failed ICSI cycles (26 with multiple attempts), 45 couples underwent AID treatment. Live birth rate per cycle of AID was 18.9%. Fifty-three patients underwent IVF-D including 6 couples who previously did not conceive with AID. Embryological outcomes including fertilization, viable cleavage embryos, and blastocyst ...
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Our review article describes the latest and current technologies implemented for the cryopreservation of single sperm that could potentially benefit patients with severe oligospermia and who rarely have any sperm in their ejaculate. This review provides a platform to understand the process and pitfalls of single-sperm cryopreservation to ensure further improvements in the cryopreservation technology in future studies. PMID: 32398019 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
This study examined 769 patients with nonobstructive azoospermia who underwent 347 cycles of micro-TESE-ICSI. Patients with azoospermia were classified into Group A (Klinefelter syndrome, n = 284, 125 cycles), Group B (azoospermia Y chromosome factor c [AZFc] microdeletion, n = 91, 64 cycles), Group C (cryptorchidism, n = 52, 39 cycles), Group D (previous mumps and bilateral orchitis, n = 23, 23 cycles), and Group E (idiopathic azoospermia, n = 319, 96 cycles). Clinical characteristics, SRR, embryonic development, and pregnancy outcomes of the patients were compared between all groups. Patients in Group D had the highest a...
Source: Asian Journal of Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Asian J Androl Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur study verifies the pathogenic role ofADGRG2 in X-linked CBAVD and broadens the spectrum ofADGRG2 mutations. In addition, we found positive ICSI outcomes in the twoADGRG2-mutated CBAVD patients.
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract For men with obstructive azoospermia, several surgical sperm retrieval techniques can facilitate conception with assisted reproductive technology. The evolution of both percutaneous and open approaches to sperm retrieval has been affected by technological innovations, including the surgical microscope, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Further modifications to these procedures are designed to minimize patient morbidity and increase the quality and quantity of sperm samples. Innovative technologies promise to further ameliorate outcomes by selecting the highest quality sper...
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Urol Clin North Am Source Type: research
Abstract The use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been a major breakthrough in the treatment of male infertility. Even patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) may benefit from the ICSI technique to father a child as long as spermatogenesis is present. There are several techniques to recover testicular sperm in patients with NOA. However, retrieval of spermatozoa is unfortunately still only successful in a subset of patients with NOA, and the most superior sperm retrieval method is still under debate. A more recent technique, microdissection testicular sperm extraction (MD-TESE) with an operat...
Source: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Ups J Med Sci Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe rate of successful TESE and the ICSI outcome in cancer survivors with NOA and RE/FOE is the same as non-cancer azoospermic patients. Female partner age (older than 40  years) was associated with a significant reduction in live birth rates after TESE-ICSI procedures.
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Azoospermia, or the absence of spermatozoa in the semen, is present in up to 10% of men presenting with infertility. The majority of these men will have nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA), or impaired production of sperm. When present, testicular sperm can be used with in  vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection to achieve fertility. One of the most effective treatment options to obtain testicular sperm is microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE). Reported rates of successful sperm retrieval with micro-TESE range from 40% to 60%.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of factors in infertile male patients to retrieve sperm from their testicles before they undergo testicular sperm extraction (TESE). In total, 64 males were enrolled in this study. Infertility was identified as obstructive azoospermia (OA); non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA); Klinefelter syndrome (KS); and cryptozoospermia (Crypt). Age, body mass index and concomitant conditions were noted. Testicular volumes, serum levels of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH), testosterone (T) and prolactin were investigated. Sperm retrie...
Source: Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Syst Biol Reprod Med Source Type: research
Authors: Fainberg J, Hayden RP, Schlegel PN Abstract Introduction: Klinefelter syndrome (KS) represents the most common chromosomal abnormality in the general population, and one of the most common genetic etiologies of nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) and in severe oligospermia. Once considered untreatable, men with KS and NOA now have a variety of treatment options to obtain paternity. Areas covered: The cornerstone of treatment for both KS and NOA patients remains the surgical retrieval of viable sperm, which can be used for intracytoplasmic sperm injection to obtain pregnancy. Although the field has advanced si...
Source: Expert Review of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
More News: Azoospermia | ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) | Urology & Nephrology