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Researchers identify gene responsible for some cases of male infertility
(Wiley) In about one-sixth of the cases of male infertility, men do not make any measurable levels of sperm, a condition called azoospermia. New research led by University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that mutations in an X chromosome gene called TEX11 are responsible for about 1 percent of azoospermia cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Penn team identifies gene responsible for some cases of male infertility
(University of Pennsylvania) Oftentimes men with a type of infertility called azoospermia don't know the underlying cause of their condition. But new research led by University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that mutations in an X chromosome gene called TEX11 are responsible for a significant number of cases of infertility -- an estimated 1 percent of cases of non-obstructive azoospermia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 1, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Well: Male Infertility Linked to Cancer
About one in six infertile men have azoospermia, or no viable sperm in their ejaculate, and these men may be at increased risk of testicular and other cancers.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Infertility Body Men and Boys Cancer Featured Source Type: news

Men Who Can't Produce Sperm Face Increased Cancer Risk, Stanford-Led Study Finds
Men who are diagnosed as azoospermic - infertile because of an absence of sperm in their ejaculate - are more prone to developing cancer than the general population, a study led by a Stanford University School of Medicine urologist has found. And a diagnosis of azoospermia before age 30 carries an eight-fold cancer risk, the study says... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Fertility Source Type: news

Low Sperm Linked To Cancer Risk
Men who have no sperm have a higher risk of developing cancer than other males, researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine reported in Fertility and Sterility (June 20th, 2013 issue). When a man has no measurable level of sperm in his semen he has azoospermia, he is azoospermic. Fertility experts estimate that approximately 1% of men are azoospermic, and that about 20% of male infertility problems are because of azoospermia... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Fertility Source Type: news

Infertile Men Have Higher Cancer Risk
Men who have no sperm have a higher risk of developing cancer than other males, researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine reported in Fertility and Sterility (June 20th, 2013 issue). When a man has no measurable level of sperm in his semen he has azoospermia, he is azoospermic. Fertility experts estimate that approximately 1% of men are azoospermic, and that about 20% of male infertility problems are because of azoospermia... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Fertility Source Type: news

Men who can't produce sperm face increased cancer risk, Stanford-led study finds
(Stanford University Medical Center) Men who are diagnosed as azoospermic -- infertile because of an absence of sperm in their ejaculate -- are more prone to developing cancer than the general population, a study led by a Stanford University School of Medicine urologist has found. And a diagnosis of azoospermia before age 30 carries an eight-fold cancer risk, the study says. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Biomarker for testicular sperm extraction outcome discovered
Researchers have used an original proteomic strategy to identify a biomarker for residual spermatogenesis in the semen of patients with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA). (Source: MedWire News - Urology)
Source: MedWire News - Urology - February 27, 2013 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news