Multidisciplinary management of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer: a consensus of SEOM, AEC, SEOR, SERVEI, and SEMNIM

AbstractColorectal cancer (CRC) has the second-highest tumor incidence and is a leading cause of death by cancer. Nearly 20% of patients with CRC will have metastases at the time of diagnosis, and more than 50% of patients with CRC develop metastatic disease during the course of their disease. A group of experts from the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology, the Spanish Association of Surgeons, the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology, the Spanish Society of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, and the Spanish Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging met to discuss and provide a multidisciplinary consensus on the management of liver metastases in patients with CRC. The group defined the different scenarios in which the disease can present: fit or unfit patients with resectable liver metastases, patients with potential resectable liver metastases, and patients with unresectable liver metastases. Within each scenario, the different strategies and therapeutic approaches are discussed.
Source: Clinical and Translational Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Conditions:   Cancer of Breast;   Cancer Colon Interventions:   Dietary Supplement: ONS Pre-op + ONS Post-op;   Dietary Supplement: ONS Pre-op + ONS Post-op + ONS Post-op 3 months;   Dietary Supplement: Usual intake Pre-op + ONS Post-op Sponsors:   International Medical University;   Kotra Pharma (M) Sdn Bhd Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Authors: Duran G, Cruz R, Simoes AR, Barros F, Balboa E, Giráldez JM, Bernárdez B, Anido U, Candamio S, López-López R, Carracedo Á, Lamas MJ Abstract We studied the predictive value for response and toxicity of functional polymorphisms in genes involved in the oxaliplatin/fluorouracil pathway in colorectal cancer patients. One hundred and twenty-seven (127) patients were treated with curative intended surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin) regimen. The median age was 65.53 (27-80) years (66.9% male, 59.1% rectum). The media...
Source: Journal of Chemotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Chemother Source Type: research
Abstract Fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) pathways are evidence-based perioperative guides that promote stress reduction and earlier return to function following surgery. They emphasize preoperative counseling, nutrition optimization, analgesia standardization, fluid and electrolyte balance, minimally invasive approaches, and early ambulation. Although ERAS pathways were implemented in 2016 on a 43-bed postoperative colorectal medical-surgical unit, inpatient stays remained beyond the projected two-day length of stay (LOS). A quality improvement team was formed and an eight-week pilot project w...
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin J Oncol Nurs Source Type: research
PMID: 32439093 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am Source Type: research
PMID: 32439092 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am Source Type: research
Abstract The most commonly recognized high-risk group for colorectal cancer (CRC) is individuals with a positive family history. It is generally recognized that those with a first-degree relative (FDR) with CRC are at a 2-fold or higher risk of CRC or advanced neoplasia. FDRs of patients with advanced adenomas have a similarly increased risk. Accordingly, all major US guidelines recommend starting CRC screening by age 40 in these groups. Barriers to screening this group include patient lack of knowledge on family and polyp history, provider limitations in collecting family history, and insufficient application of ...
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am Source Type: research
This article reviews alternative colorectal cancer (CRC) screening tests, including flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS), computed tomography (CT) colonography, and colon capsule endoscopy. FS has abundant and convincing evidence supporting its use for CRC screening and is a commonly used CRC test worldwide. CT colonography has demonstrated convincing results for CRC screening, but concerns regarding cost, accuracy for flat or sessile neoplasia, reproducibility, extracolonic findings, and lack of coverage have limited its use and development. Colon capsule endoscopy has demonstrated encouraging results for polyp detection in averag...
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am Source Type: research
Abstract After 2 screen-setting studies showing high sensitivity for colorectal cancer and advanced precancerous lesions, multitarget stool DNA testing was endorsed by the US Preventative Services Task Force as a first-line colorectal cancer screening test. Uptake has increased exponentially since approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Adherence to testing is approximately 70%. Patients with positive results have high diagnostic colonoscopy completion rates in single-center studies. The positive predictive value for colorectal neoplasia in postapproval studi...
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am Source Type: research
Abstract The goal of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening with colonoscopy is to minimize CRC with minimal risk and cost. In order to continuously improve the quality of colonoscopy, different outcomes must be measured. For this topic, the priority indicators to be measured are (1) frequency of scheduling colonoscopy at appropriate interval based on current guidelines; (2) frequency of identifying adenomas in average-risk individuals undergoing their first screening colonoscopy; and, (3) providing guideline-consistent recommendations for repeat colonoscopy after the procedure. PMID: 32439087 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am Source Type: research
Abstract Most colorectal cancer screening in the United States occurs in the opportunistic setting, where screening is initiated by a patient-provider interaction. Colonoscopy provides the longest-interval protection, and high-quality colonoscopy is ideally suited to the opportunistic setting. Both detection and colonoscopic resection have improved as a result of intense scientific investigation. Further improvements in detection are expected with the introduction of artificial intelligence programs into colonoscopy platforms. We may expect recommended intervals or colonoscopy after negative examinations performed...
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am Source Type: research
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Colorectal Cancer | Liver | Nuclear Medicine | Radiology | Spain Health | Urology & Nephrology