Comment on “Impact of Preoperative Opioid Use on Health Outcomes Following Bariatric Surgery.”

The opioid epidemic has had far reaching consequences for bariatric surgeons. We have had an awakening and have collectively realized that our sub-specialty has to do a better job at protecting our patients from this destructive addiction process. In a study of nine hospital systems in the US, 4.0% of patients who were not chronic opioid users prior to bariatric surgery converted to chronic use after surgery.1 Another similar study indicated that 77% of bariatric surgical patients who were on chronic pain medicines prior to surgery, not only remained on opioid therapy post surgically , but collectively increased their overall opioid intake.2 Recently, the ASMBS and the American College of Surgeons, through the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Project (MBSAQIP) have instituted two nationwide quality improvement projects: ENERGY (Employing Enhanced Recovery Goals in Bariatric Surgery)3 and the ongoing BSTOP (Bariatric Surgery Targeting Opioid Prescriptions) projects.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research

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Abstract Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are key events in signal transduction since they affect protein function by regulating their abundance and/or activity. PTMs involve the covalent attachment of functional groups to specific amino acids. Since they tend to be generally reversible, PTMs serve as regulators of signal transduction pathways. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are major signaling proteins that undergo multiple types of PTMs. In this Review, we focus on the opioid receptors, members of GPCR family A, and highlight recent advances in the field that have underscored the importance of PTMs i...
Source: Trends in Neurosciences - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Trends Neurosci Source Type: research
The objective of this narrative review is to familiarize primary care clinicians with the variety of acute treatment options available in the United States today based on clinical trial findings, meta-analyses, evidence-based guidelines, and professional society consensus statements. PMID: 32459561 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: High-intensity strength training is strongly associated with lower levels of MP in arm-hand, neck-shoulder, and back, whereas no association was found with frequency or lower intensities. PMID: 32464597 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Physical Activity and Health - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: J Phys Act Health Source Type: research
The opioid epidemic has had far reaching consequences for bariatric surgeons. We have had an awakening and have collectively realized our subspecialty has to do a better job at protecting our patients from this destructive addiction process. In a study of 9 hospital systems in the United States, 4.0% of patients who were not chronic opioid users before bariatric surgery converted to chronic use after surgery [1]. Another similar study indicated 77% of bariatric surgical patients who were on chronic pain medicines before surgery, not only remained on opioid therapy postsurgically, but collectively increased their overall opioid intake [2].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Comment Source Type: research
Conclusion: Safer prescribing policies may take multiple years to fully implement and need to be employed across the jurisdiction to minimize doctor-shopping and adverse effects on patients with chronic pain. Approaching pain management through the social-ecological model can address potential root causes of addiction and establish a framework for doctors to provide compassionate care, community leadership, and advocacy for these patients. PMID: 31790125 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: J Am Osteopath Assoc Source Type: research
Dallas Fire-Rescue Medical Director Marshal Isaacs, MD, calls them "prime numbers." He’s referring not only to drug-seekers—although many of them belong to the population of patients who "fall off the grid" in between encounters with the healthcare system, and therefore pose a major challenge to being tracked over time. These patients can be transients or migrant workers; they can be living in short-stay accommodations like motels, and therefore moving frequently around a region; they can be suffering from mental illness or addiction and moving among rehabilitation centers; or they...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Exclusive Articles Documentation & Patient Care Reporting Columns Source Type: news
Prescription opioid use has increased significantly over the past 25 years due to a number of factors including efforts to help patients struggling to cope with pain, overprescribing by providers and marketing by pharmaceutical companies. However, opioids provide euphoria as well as analgesia [1]. This euphoria coupled with iatrogenic physical dependence and addictive qualities has contributed to an epidemic of opioid abuse, addiction and overdose [2]. The increased use of opioids for treating non-cancer chronic pain and the increased use of higher-dose and higher bioavailability formulations has added to what the Centers ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
(Research!America) The opioid epidemic is the most important health issue in West Virginia, above obesity, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and dental disease, according to a state-based public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America. A strong majority of West Virginians (84%) say prescription pain medication abuse and addiction is a major problem in their community, and more than two-thirds (71%) say they know someone who experienced pain so severe they sought prescription medicines to treat it.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Halyard Health (NYSE:HYH) said today it won FDA clearance for its Coolief cooled radiofrequency thermal system designed for treating moderate to severe chronic osteoarthritis knee pain The Alpharetta, Ga.-based company claims that the Coolief is the 1st and only RF treatment to be cleared by the FDA for relieving OA pain. “I see many patients who suffer with chronic osteoarthritis knee pain in my practice who are not immediate candidates for knee replacement surgery due to co-morbidities, such as obesity or other chronic health issues. Coolief Cooled RF treatment provides significant pain rel...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Tags: Orthopedics Pain Management Regulatory/Compliance Halyard Health Source Type: news
A panel of physician experts offered three actions every physician can take to appropriately treat patients with acute or chronic pain. Presenting at the 2016 AMA Annual Meeting, they also discussed tools that can help keep patients safe from overdose and improve their quality of life. The panel was comprised of physician representatives from the AMA Task Force to Reduce Prescription Opioid Abuse and one of the nation’s leading health policy experts. In light of the opioid epidemic, the task force has put forth recommendations for physicians. “These recommendations come from our colleagues,” Patrice A...
Source: AMA Wire - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: news
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