Why do subchondral cysts occur at the medial aspect of the femoral head in hip dysplasia?

Why do subchondral cysts occur at the medial aspect of the femoral head in hip dysplasia? Hip Int. 2020 Mar 16;:1120700020912169 Authors: Chang JS, Song JH, Kim JW, Shin HK, Park HJ, Cho Y, Lee I, Park JH Abstract INTRODUCTION: Osteoarthritis in dysplastic hips should develop from the lateral side of the acetabulum and the femoral head just below. However, the existence of subchondral cysts located more on the medial side contradicts the weight-loading theory. The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of medial cysts at the femoral head and to investigate the relationship between medial cysts and injuries of the ligamentum teres in hip dysplasia. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on 257 cases of hip dysplasia. All patients had x-rays and 3-dimensional computed tomographies (3D CT) preoperatively and 123 patients had magnetic resonance arthrographies. A comparison was performed between cases with and without medial cysts according to the severity of damage to the ligamentum teres, the presence of bony spurs around the fovea capitis, and the Tönnis grade. RESULTS: Medial subchondral cysts around the fovea capitis were found in 100 cases. Mild osteoarthritis (Tönnis grade 0 or 1) was present in 89% of cases in the medial cyst group. A significant difference between the groups was observed in the incidence of bony spurs around the fovea capitis (p 
Source: Hip International - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Hip Int Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: The clinical and radiological results concerning the MINIMA® short stem are excellent according to this first report of this specific design of the short femoral stems. Because of the small number of cases and short-term follow-up of this study, a longer follow up time and more patients' enrollment is required. PMID: 32405472 [PubMed]
Source: World Journal of Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: World J Orthop Source Type: research
Imagine you’re walking along and suddenly experience excruciating knee pain. Though it initially seems stuck in one position, after a minute or two you can limp along home, but just barely. At your doctor’s visit, an x-ray is normal but symptoms continue for weeks. An MRI is performed and now you have an explanation: a torn meniscus. (Two menisci — rubbery cartilage pads that act as shock absorbers — separate the bottom of your knee bone from the top of your shin bone.) A month later, you’re no better despite rest, pain medicines, and physical therapy. It’s time for surgery to fix it, ri...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Injuries Osteoarthritis Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs
‚ÄčThe wrist is not commonly aspirated in the emergency department, but emergent arthrocentesis may be indicated for extreme or concerning cases, and tapping the wrist to determine the underlying pathology or relieve pain may be of great value. The synovial fluid from the joint space can be analyzed for crystals, infection, and blood. This information may help determine the overall plan and aid in decision-making and consultation. The ultimate treatment plan may include admission, intravenous antibiotics, multiple aspirations, and even surgical washout.A swollen, painful wrist that is hot to the touch is concerning for sep...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Osteoarthritis is a common and potentially debilitating condition. It’s a degenerative joint disease (often called the “wear-and-tear” type) in which the smooth lining of cartilage becomes thinned and uneven, exposing the bone beneath. Although osteoarthritis is tightly linked with aging, we now know there is more to it than age alone: genetics, weight, physical activity, and a number of other factors can conspire to make it more likely that someone will develop osteoarthritis while someone else won’t. Osteoarthritis is the primary reason that more than a million joints (mostly hips and knees) are r...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Osteoarthritis Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 25 September 2019Source: Orthopaedics &Traumatology: Surgery &ResearchAuthor(s): Hubert Lenoir, Yacine Carlier, Matthieu Ferrand, Anne Vidil, Pierre Desmoineaux, Francophone Arthroscopy Society (SFA)AbstractIntroductionThe primary symptoms of elbow osteoarthritis are the progressive development of stiffness along with pain at the end range of motion due to osteophyte impingement. Surgical treatment involves resecting these “bone stops”. In the literature, these osteophytic lesions are more common than cartilage lesions, which suggests they may occur beforehand. The aim...
Source: Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeThe purpose of this study was to report the long-term outcomes of a continuous series of patients who underwent simultaneous anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) for varus-related early medial tibio-femoral osteoarthritis. It was hypothesized that this combined surgery sustainably allowed return to sport with efficient clinical and radiological results.MethodsFrom 1995 to 2015, all combined ACL reconstruction (bone-patellar tendon-bone graft) and opening wedge HTO for anterior laxity and early medial arthritis were included. Clinical evaluation at fina...
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionTwenty years after open rotator cuff repair, the rate of osteoarthritis was 29%. Massive rotator cuff tears were significantly associated with a higher rate of osteoarthritis. Less osteoarthritis was observed when suprasupinatus healed.Level of evidenceIV.
Source: Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionThe authors propose that this case represent an uncommon subset of osteoarthritis. Regular review, both clinically and radiologically, is required to assess speed of progression and to prevent rapid loss of bone stock without the surgeon being aware.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionThe authors propose that this case represent an uncommon subset of osteoarthritis. Regular review, both clinically and radiologically, is required to assess speed of progression and to prevent rapid loss of bone stock without the surgeon being aware.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
If self-care steps for back pain such as gentle activity, local heat, or massage don’t ease discomfort within a few weeks to a month, or if you struggle with chronic low back pain, a physiatrist can help you navigate the dizzying number of treatment options. These range from conservative therapies (such as medicines, physical therapy, and chiropractic care) to more invasive options (such as spine injections and spinal surgery). What is a physiatrist? Physiatrists are medical doctors who specialize in physical medicine and rehabilitation. We focus on holistic, nonsurgical care aimed at improving function for people wh...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Bones and joints Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
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