Universal Human Papillomavirus Vaccination And Impact In A Southern Italian Region.

Universal Human Papillomavirus Vaccination And Impact In A Southern Italian Region. Curr Pharm Des. 2020 Feb 11;: Authors: Guido M, Bruno A, Tagliaferro L, Aprile V, Tinelli A, Fedele A, Lobreglio G, Menegazzi P, Pasanisi G, Tassi V, Forcina B, Fortunato F, Lupo LI, Zizza A Abstract HPV is still the most common sexually transmitted infection, leading to the onset of many disorders while causing an increase in direct and indirect health costs. High Risk (HR) HPV is the primary cause of invasive cervical cancer and contributes significantly to the development of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The introduction of universal HPV vaccination has led to a significant reduction in vaccine-targeted HPV infections, cross-protective genotypes, precancerous lesions and anogenital warts. Despite the several limitations of HPV vaccination programs, including vaccine type specificity, different schedules, target age-groups and poor communication, the impact has become increasingly evident, especially in countries with high vaccine uptake. We carried out a review of the most recent literature to evaluate the effects of HPV vaccination on vaccine-targeted HPV genotypes and to assess the level of cross-protection provided against non-vaccine HPV types. Subsequently, to assess the rates of HPV infection in a southeast Italian region, we performed an epidemiological investigation into the impact of vaccination on genotypes and on the prevalence and distribution of HP...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 6 April 2020Source: Clinica Chimica ActaAuthor(s): Junxia Duan, Yue Zhao, Xiaohong Zhang, Han Jiang, Bibo Xie, Tie Zhao, Feijun Zhao
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
Authors: Pappas-Gogos G, Baltagiannis EG, Kyrochristos ID, Ziogas DE, Goussia A, Mitsis M, Roukos DH PMID: 32250157 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Future Medicine: Biomarkers in Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Biomark Med Source Type: research
AbstractIn the U.S. there is an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). One of the most prevalent STIs is the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Certain high risk strains of HPV are believed to cause virtually all cervical cancers, over 90% of anal cancers, 70% of oropharyngeal cancers, and the majority of anal  genital warts. HPV is preventable through vaccination and is available for both men and women. Several educational interventions have been employed, yet baseline awareness and knowledge related to HPV and 9vHPV remains relatively low among young men. What is not known is the most effective method for provid...
Source: Journal of Community Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
In this study it was assumed that there was no immunity following resolution of natural infection. The modeling demonstrated that a vaccine of moderate efficacy could have a significant impact on the prevalence of gonorrhea if strategically implemented (23). While encouraging it does, of course, depend on the availability of a vaccine. From Ecological Data to Evidence The epidemiological evidence from Cuba, Brazil, and New Zealand demonstrates that N. meningitidis OMV vaccines are possibly able to provide some broader protection against meningococcal disease (17, 24), particularly in older children and adults (25). These...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion This study uses a large amount of national data to give us an idea about which groups of people have the greatest risk of carrying potentially cancer-causing oral HPV . But while oral HPV may increase people's risk of mouth and throat cancers, the actual number who would go on to develop cancer is extremely small. This study has limitations, which are worth bearing in mind: It only looked at whether people had oral HPV at a single point in time. This makes it difficult to know at what point they became infected and how much this could be down to other risk factors such as smoking, oral sex and number of partne...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news
This report provides the most recent national estimates of oral HPV prevalence among adults aged 18-69 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2014, as well as prevalence of genital HPV among adults aged 18-59 from NHANES 2013-2014. Estimates of any HPV (37 types tested) as well as high-risk HPV (14 of the 37 types) are provided. PMID: 28463105 [PubMed - in process]
Source: NCHS data brief - Category: American Health Tags: NCHS Data Brief Source Type: research
This report provides the most recent national estimates of oral HPV prevalence among adults aged 18-69 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2014, as well as prevalence of genital HPV among adults aged 18-59 from NHANES 2013-2014. Estimates of any HPV (37 types tested) as well as high-risk HPV (14 of the 37 types) are provided. PMID: 28437239 [PubMed - in process]
Source: NCHS data brief - Category: American Health Tags: NCHS Data Brief Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) contributes to the most common sexually transmitted infections, with repeated and persistent infection with particular types causing disease in both men and women. Infection with low‐risk HPV types can lead to genital warts and benign lesions of the oral cavity, while high‐risk types can cause various HPV‐related malignancies. The incidence of head and neck cancers has been rising in the past number of decades mostly due to oropharyngeal cancer linked to HPV infection. HPV vaccination has been shown to be effective for cervical and other anogenital HPV‐related cancers, and there is signif...
Source: Oral Diseases - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Invited Concise Review Source Type: research
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Source: Oral Diseases - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Invited Concise Review Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection. It affects 80% of the population, with the initial infection usually occurring between 15 and 24 years of age. Persistent infection with high-risk oncogenic HPV genotypes, primarily types 16 and 18, is the cause of almost all cervical cancers.1 HPV is also thought to cause about 95% of anal cancers, 75% of oropharyngeal cancers, 75% of vaginal cancers, 70% of vulvar cancers, and 60% of penile cancers.2 Low-risk or non-oncogenic genotypes (eg, types 6 and 11) cause anogenital warts, low-grade cervical disease, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.
Source: LANCET - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Comment Source Type: research
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer Vaccines | Cervical Cancer | Cervical Cancer Vaccine | Drugs & Pharmacology | Epidemiology | Genital Warts | Girls | Human Papillomavirus (HPV) | Italy Health | Men | Oropharyngeal Cancer | STDs | Vaccines | Warts