Demystifying Medicine 2020: Ebola: Then, Now and the NIH (National Institutes of Health)

Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published: 1/14/2020. This one-hour, 44-minute presentation discusses how the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been at the forefront in the global effort to prevent the spread of Ebola virus. NIH staff were deployed in western Africa during the 2015-2016 Ebola outbreak to provide primary care to those infected, and Ebola patients were received at the NIH Clinical Center. For many years prior, NIH scientists studied the natural reservoirs of emerging viruses such as Ebola virus and have elucidated the biology of Ebola virus infection, which has informed the creation of investigational Ebola vaccines. (Video or Multimedia)
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ConclusionWith advanced training and adherence to infection prevention and control practices, clinical interventions, including critical care, are feasible and safe to perform in critically ill patients. With specific anti-Ebola medications, most patients can survive Ebola virus infection.
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