Niemann-Pick C1 Heterogeneity of Bat Cells Controls Filovirus Tropism

Publication date: 14 January 2020Source: Cell Reports, Volume 30, Issue 2Author(s): Yoshihiro Takadate, Tatsunari Kondoh, Manabu Igarashi, Junki Maruyama, Rashid Manzoor, Hirohito Ogawa, Masahiro Kajihara, Wakako Furuyama, Masahiro Sato, Hiroko Miyamoto, Reiko Yoshida, Terence E. Hill, Alexander N. Freiberg, Heinz Feldmann, Andrea Marzi, Ayato TakadaSummaryFruit bats are suspected to be natural hosts of filoviruses, including Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV). Interestingly, however, previous studies suggest that these viruses have different tropisms depending on the bat species. Here, we show a molecular basis underlying the host-range restriction of filoviruses. We find that bat-derived cell lines FBKT1 and ZFBK13-76E show preferential susceptibility to EBOV and MARV, respectively, whereas the other bat cell lines tested are similarly infected with both viruses. In FBKT1 and ZFBK13-76E, unique amino acid (aa) sequences are found in the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein, one of the cellular receptors interacting with the filovirus glycoprotein (GP). These aa residues, as well as a few aa differences between EBOV and MARV GPs, are crucial for the differential susceptibility to filoviruses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the heterogeneity of bat NPC1 orthologs is an important factor controlling filovirus species-specific host tropism.Graphical Abstract
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research

Related Links:

A new animated video shows how 40 days into the coronavirus outbreak it infected more people than on the 40th day of the respective Ebola, swine flu, SARS and MERS outbreaks.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Okay, I'm not an epidemiologist or a virologist. But I do know something about those subjects, I'm a public health professor, and I am an expert in clinical communication and risk communication. So I'm going to offer some observations that I hope will help people keep this public health scare in proper perspective and maybe be of practical use.There are two important parameters we need to understand the risk caused by any communicable disease. I'm going to broadly say transmissibility, and the probability that exposure will lead to serious disease.We often see transmissibility represented as a single number, called R0 or &...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
[Monitor] Makerere University College of Health Sciences has made an Ebola diagnostic testing device, which will be used to test the disease among Ugandans in case of an outbreak.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Moderna Therapeutics, a biotech company based in Cambridge, Mass., has shipped the first batches of its COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine was created just 42 days after the genetic sequence of the COVID_19 virus, called SARS-CoV-2, was released by Chinese researchers in mid-January. The first vials were sent to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, which will ready the vaccine for human testing as early as April. NIH scientists also began testing an antiviral drug called remdesivir that had been developed for Ebola, on a patient infec...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
What’s worth some 1,204.8 billion USD? Well, it’s the worldwide pharmaceutical market, of course! With such a capital at stake and with the pace of technological disruption, the pharma industry is quick to adapt to the changing times. In fact, leading drug companies are re-investing as much as 20.8% of drug sales into new drug development.  We’ve analyzed the trends shaping the future of pharma before, but how can we expect to see the landscape evolve in this new decade? With leaps in A.I., patient empowerment and 3D printed drugs, here are the 5 aspects that will be the focus of pharmaceutical co...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Pharma digital health future of medicine pharmaceutics digital health companies Source Type: blogs
J. J. Herstein et al.
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Authors: PMID: 32079788 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Am J Nurs Source Type: research
Marceline Côté Filoviruses, such as Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus, are causative agents of unpredictable outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non-human primates. For infection, filoviral particles need to be internalized and delivered to intracellular vesicles containing cathepsin proteases and the viral receptor Niemann-Pick C1. Previous studies have shown that EBOV triggers macropinocytosis of the viral particles in a glycoprotein (GP)-dependent manner, but the molecular events required for filovirus internalization remain mostly unknown. Here we report that the diacylglycerol kina...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2018 Source:Antiviral Research, Volume 149 Author(s): Olena Shtanko, Yasuteru Sakurai, Ann N. Reyes, Romain Noël, Jean-Christophe Cintrat, Daniel Gillet, Julien Barbier, Robert A. Davey Members of the family Filoviridae cause severe, often fatal disease in humans, for which there are no approved vaccines and only a few experimental drugs tested in animal models. Retro-2, a small molecule that inhibits retrograde trafficking of bacterial and plant toxins inside host cells, has been demonstrated to be effective against a range of bacterial and virus pathogens, both in vitro and in animal model...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
RA Abstract Members of the family Filoviridae cause severe, often fatal disease in humans, for which there are no approved vaccines and only a few experimental drugs tested in animal models. Retro-2, a small molecule that inhibits retrograde trafficking of bacterial and plant toxins inside host cells, has been demonstrated to be effective against a range of bacterial and virus pathogens, both in vitro and in animal models. Here, we demonstrated that Retro-2 and its derivatives, Retro-2.1 and compound 25, blocked infection by Ebola virus and Marburg virus in vitro. We show that the derivatives were more potent inh...
Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
More News: Cytology | Ebola | Filovirus | Marburg Virus | Niemann-Pick Disease | Study