Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's might disrupt swimming ability

(Reuters Health) - A small study finds that some people lose their ability to swim when their Parkinson's disease is treated with deep brain stimulation.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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ConclusionsStimulation of STN at 80 Hz and 130 Hz may have different effects on proximal and distal muscle control. One hundred and thirty Hertz may have a small advantage for distal hand muscles, whereas 80 Hz is more effective in improving proximal muscle function.
Source: Neurophysiologie Clinique - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most successful surgical procedure for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients [1] when certain cardinal symptoms are insufficiently controlled with medications and medication-induced motor complications emerge. It has become the most significant treatment option for PD after levodopa. There is clear evidence of its superiority over continued best medical management of cardinal PD motor symptoms, motor complications, and overall quality of life in carefully selected PD patients [2 –4].
Source: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most successful surgical procedure for the treatment of advanced Parkinson ’s disease (PD) patients [1] when certain cardinal symptoms are insufficiently controlled with medications resulting in motor complications including excessive off time and dyskinesias. It has become the most significant treatment option for PD after levodopa. There is clear evidence of DBS superi ority over continued best medical management of cardinal PD motor symptoms, motor complications, and overall quality of life in carefully selected PD patients [2-4].
Source: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Condition:   Parkinson Disease Intervention:   Device: Deep Brain Stimulation Sponsors:   Northwell Health;   National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS);   The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionsTogether, these results demonstrate the importance of personalized targeting and validate a set of microelectrode recording signatures to predict therapeutic activation volumes. These features may be used to improve the efficiency of deep brain stimulation programming and highlight specific neural oscillations of physiological importance.
Source: Brain Stimulation - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
There could soon be an eye test to aid in the assessment of Parkinson’s disease. FDA has recently granted breakthrough device designation to a technology designed by RightEye that uses objective eye movement measurements to help detect the neurological disease. If the RightEye Vision System could gain a nod from FDA for detection, it would be a gamechanger because currently, no single test is capable of definitively diagnosing Parkinson's disease. Doctors instead rely on a variety of neurological examinations designed to confirm the clinical diagnosis, and misdiagnosis remains a continuing iss...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news
Subthalamic deep brain stimulation alleviates motor symptoms of Parkinson disease by activating precise volumes of neural tissue. While electrophysiological and anatomical correlates of clinically effective electrode sites have been described, therapeutic stimulation likely acts through multiple distinct neural populations, necessitating the need to characterize the full span of tissue activation. Microelectrode recordings have yet to be mapped to therapeutic tissue activation volumes and surveyed for predictive markers.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion: Medication and DBS both improved postural alignment in PD patients, but effects were small for the entire cohort. Patients with camptocormia according to the TCC angle benefit strongest. The large differences of the treatment effects may indicate distinct pathological mechanisms for stooped posture and postural disorders. The TCC angle was shown to be sensitive to change. The UCC angle was less sensitive but may be a useful assessment tool for a subgroup.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is an established therapy for alleviating motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients; however, a postoperative decline in cognitive and speech function has become problematic although its mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the properties of language and drawing ability and cerebral perfusion in PD patients after bilateral STN DBS surgery.
Source: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
MONDAY, Dec. 2, 2019 -- Some Parkinson's patients who have a deep brain stimulation device implanted to control their symptoms have reported an odd side effect -- they lost the ability to swim. Researchers report on the cases of nine patients who...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
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