Alcohol, Smoking Alter Estradiol Levels in Hormone Therapy Alcohol, Smoking Alter Estradiol Levels in Hormone Therapy

Alcohol use and smoking independently and inversely predict estradiol levels in women who are postmenopausal, likely because of their involvement with liver metabolism.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with serum estradiol (E2) levels among healthy postmenopausal women using hormone therapy (HT). METHODS: This is an unplanned post hoc analysis of data from ELITE (Early versus Late Intervention Trial with Estradiol), a randomized controlled trial of 1 mg oral E2 with or without vaginal progesterone in healthy early compared with late (
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Have you ever spent the day in a city with such bad air pollution that when you blew your nose the mucus had a black tinge? Have you ever coughed as you breathed in diesel fumes from a passing bus and thought to yourself, “Well, that’s a year gone from my life”? Could it actually be true — that air pollution leads to an early death? The answer, in fact, is an unqualified yes. Air pollution causes heart disease, lung disease, and early death It has been known for some time that air pollution causes lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, asthma, heart disease, and stroke. One r...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Environmental health Healthy Aging Memory Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsOur study supports a healthy lifestyle improving breast cancer prevention, postponing onset of disease, and extending life expectancy among breast cancer patients.
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
k Environmental and lifestyle factors are believed to account for >80% of breast cancers; however, it is not well understood how and when these factors affect risk and which exposed individuals will actually develop the disease. While alcohol consumption, obesity, and hormone therapy are some known risk factors for breast cancer, other exposures associated with breast cancer risk have not yet been identified or well characterized. In this paper, it is proposed that the identification of blood epigenetic markers for personal, in utero, and ancestral environmental exposures can help researchers better understand k...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
This study investigated how a history of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) impacts clinical outcomes overall and in different subgroups of breast cancer patients. The study included 814 primary breast cancer patients aged ≥50 years in Sweden (2002–2012) with follow-up until 2016. Associations between patient- and tumor characteristics, recurrences, and overall survival were analyzed in relation to MHT. After a median follow-up of 7 years, 119 recurrences, and 111 deaths occurred. Ever MHT (n = 433, 53.2%) was associated with a lower BMI, frequency of alcohol abstinence, and histological grade, higher frequency of o...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurposeGiven that 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC) is the first identified endogenous selective estrogen receptor modulator, the aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which dietary or lifestyle factors impact circulating 27HC concentrations in a large-scale setting.MethodsThis cross-sectional analysis included 1,036 women aged 35 –65 years who served as controls in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heidelberg breast cancer case–control study. Circulating 27HC was quantified in serum using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Generalized line...
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: A higher education level may be associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer, in which alcohol use, age at menopause, and hormone therapy may, at least partially, play a mediating role.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Lifestyle factors such as alcohol use and smoking alter estradiol levels in women receiving hormone therapy, according to a study presented at the North American Menopause Society Annual Meeting.Medscape
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
Clinical and lifestyle factors including BMI, surgical menopause, smoking, alcohol use and antifungal medication influence estradiol levels in menopausal women taking hormone therapy, according to a study presented at the North American Menopause Society annual meeting.Healio
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
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