Pregnancy Status, Risk Factors, and Opportunities for Referral to Care Among Reproductive-Aged Women With Newly Reported Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Tennessee.

CONCLUSION: A high proportion of reproductive-aged women with newly diagnosed HCV infection were pregnant. Surveillance-informed outreach to this population was feasible and provided opportunities for counseling and linkage to confirmatory testing and treatment. Future studies should evaluate whether a similar model would enhance testing and linkage to care of HCV-exposed infants. PMID: 31738858 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Public Health Reports - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rep Source Type: research

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Authors: Ifeorah IM, Bakarey AS, Akubo AO, Onyemelukwe FN Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with liver complicated diseases resulting in end-stage hepatocellular carcinoma. Although vertical transmission from mother to child serves as one of the routes of HCV acquisition in children, yet HCV infection in pregnant women and children is still underappreciated in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, this study investigated the burden of HCV, associated risk factors, and viremia among antenatal and postnatal clinic attendees in the rural and urban communities of Kogi State, Nigeria. Atotal of 176 blood samples w...
Source: Journal of Immunoassay and Immunochemistry - Category: Biochemistry Tags: J Immunoassay Immunochem Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The reported prevalence of maternal HCV infection has increased 161% from 2009 to 2017. PMID: 31923064 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by persistent high-level viremia and defective cellular immunity, including a lack of functional HCV-specific CD4+ T cells. We previously described an exceptional period of viral control that occurs in some chronically infected women after childbirth. Here, we investigated whether reduced HCV replication after pregnancy is associated with recovery of CD4+ T cell immunity. Class II tetramer analysis revealed significantly greater frequencies of circulating HCV-specific CD4+ T cells at 3 months postpartum in women with concurrent declines in viremia compared with tho...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
SMFM currently recommends anti-HCV antibody testing in pregnant patients with risk factors (RFs). However, due to HCV prevalence and 95-99% cure rates using antiviral treatments, universal testing is in question. Recently (2019), there have been 2 publications on universal HCV testing using simulation models both reporting cost-effectiveness. However, through a literature search, we did not find any large prospective study evaluating actual capture rates (&cost-effectiveness) comparing testing based on RFs vs.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session II Source Type: research
Although the prevalence of Hepatitis C (HCV) infection is increasing in young women in the US, the effects of HCV on pregnancy and perinatal outcomes are poorly defined. We compared maternal and neonatal outcomes between women with a positive HCV screen (HCV+) and those in a general obstetric population to further define adverse perinatal outcomes associated with HCV+ in pregnancy.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session III Source Type: research
Despite increasing prevalence of Hepatitis C (HCV) infection in young women in the US, risk-based screening for HCV in pregnancy remains the standard. We compared characteristics of women who underwent risk-based versus universal HCV screening in pregnancy.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session IV Source Type: research
Current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend limiting hepatitis C (HCV) screening during pregnancy to high-risk groups only. We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of universal screening among all pregnant persons.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session IV Source Type: research
Due to increasing incidence of Hepatitis C (HCV) infection in younger populations, there is increased interest in screening in pregnancy, linkage to care, and postpartum treatment. However, the care cascade prospects in this population are poorly understood. We aimed to identify maternal sociodemographic (SD) and pregnancy characteristics in HCV-infected women associated with successful follow-up and initiation of HCV treatment.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session V Source Type: research
The United States is in the midst of perinatal hepatitis C viral infection (HCV) and substance use syndemic, defined as two or more concurrent epidemics clustered in a population with biological interactions. Both perinatal substance use and HCV are associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. However, whether HCV is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes remains unknown. Our objective was to assess the risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes attributable to HCV.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session V Source Type: research
ConclusionsClinical testing guidelines have not been effectively translated to practice. Additionally, compared to HIV and HBV, HCV infections during pregnancy are becoming more prevalent, yet current national HCV screening guidelines are the least comprehensive.
Source: Maternal and Child Health Journal - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
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