GSE136028 TCR sequencing paired with massively parallel 3 ′ RNA-seq reveals clonotypic T cell signatures

Contributors : Ang A Tu ; Todd M Gierahn ; Brinda Monian ; Duncan M Morgan ; Naveen K Mehta ; Bert Ruiter ; Wayne G Shreffler ; Alex K Shalek ; J C LoveSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Mus musculusHigh-throughput 3 ′ single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) allows cost-effective, detailed characterization of individualimmune cells from tissues. Current techniques, however, are limited in their ability to elucidate essential immune cell features,including variable sequences of T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) that confer antigen specificity. Here, we present a strategy thatenables simultaneous analysis of TCR sequences and corresponding full transcriptomes from 3 ′-barcoded scRNA-seq samples.This approach is compatible with common 3 ′ scRNA-seq methods, and adaptable to processed samples post hoc. We appliedthe technique to identify transcriptional signatures associated with T cells sharing common TCRs from immunized mice andfrom patients with food allergy. We observed preferential phenotypes among subsets of expanded clonotypes, including type 2helper CD4+ T cell (TH2) states associated with food allergy. These results demonstrate the utility of our method when studyingdiseases in which clonotype-driven responses are critical to understanding the underlying biology.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research

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FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 -- Early introduction of allergenic foods may prevent the development of food allergy in certain infants at high risk, although adherence to early introduction is low, according to three studies published in the December issue...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
(King's College London) Research undertaken by King's College London and St George's, University of London has found that introducing certain foods early to infants can prevent them from developing an allergy despite low adherence to an introduction regime.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
(Murdoch Childrens Research Institute) Children with food allergies are seen 10 months sooner and have fewer allergic reactions when treated by a paediatrician in their own community, a new study shows.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of ReviewInvestigational allergen immunotherapies (AITs) including oral immunotherapy (OIT), sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) have proven to increase allergen thresholds required to elicit an allergic reaction in a majority of subjects. However, these studies lack consistent biomarkers to predict therapy outcomes. Here, we will review biomarkers that are currently being investigated for AIT.Recent FindingsThe mechanisms underlying the therapeutic benefit of AIT involve various cell types, including mast cells, basophils, T cells, and B cells. Skin prick and basophil act...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Peanut allergy affects 1-2% of individuals in the United States, and is increasing in prevalence.1-4 Although there is accumulating data on immunotherapy for peanut allergy,5-8 the cornerstone of management remains strict avoidance of peanut protein, maintenance of an emergency action plan and prompt use of epinephrine to treat systemic reactions in case of an accidental exposure, which occurs in up to 12-15% of peanut-allergic individuals annually.9,10 Peanut allergy significantly impacts quality of life,11 as it is typically lifelong, is the leading cause of food-induced anaphylaxis in children, and the leading cause of ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Growing evidence points to an important role for the commensal microbiota in susceptibility to food allergy. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate associations between exposures known to modify the microbiome and risk of food allergy. Direct profiling of the gut microbiome in human cohort studies has demonstrated that individuals with food allergy have distinct gut microbiomes compared to healthy control subjects, and dysbiosis precedes the development of food allergy. Mechanistic studies in mouse models of food allergy have confirmed that the composition of the intestinal microbiota can imprint susceptibility or resistance to...
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Reviews and feature article Source Type: research
The early introduction group participants of the Enquiring About Tolerance study were asked to undertake a proscriptive regimen of early introduction and sustained consumption of 6 allergenic foods. It was envisaged that this might be challenging, and early introduction group families were presented with an open-text question to express any problems they were experiencing with the regimen in recurring online questionnaires.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Food allergy and gastrointestinal disease Source Type: research
The Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) study examined whether the early introduction of 6 allergenic foods from 3  months of age in exclusively breastfed infants prevented the development of food allergy. The intervention was effective in the per-protocol analysis for allergy to 1 or more foods and for egg and peanut individually, but only 42% of early introduction group (EIG) children met the per-protocol cri teria.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Food allergy and gastrointestinal disease Source Type: research
The Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) study was a randomized trial of the early introduction of allergenic solids into the infant diet from 3  months of age. The intervention effect did not reach statistical significance in the intention-to-treat analysis of the primary outcome.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Food allergy and gastrointestinal disease Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review article is to discuss the recent literature around methods of prevention of food allergies other than peanut allergy.Recent FindingsWhile the most robust data to date exists for peanut, there are emerging studies suggesting a beneficial effect to early introduction of cooked egg, and cow ’s milk as well. While the literature is sparse for other allergens such as tree nuts, finned fish, and shellfish, the mechanism of sensitization is thought to be the same and no study to date has demonstrated a harm with allergenic introduction in the 4–6 months of age window...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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