Firehosing: the systemic strategy that anti-vaxxers are using to spread misinformation | Lucky Tran

Anti-vaxxers keep telling the same obvious lies without shame, despite being debunked and factcheckedYet again a popular show is giving an anti-vaxxer a high-profile platform to spread lies and cause harm to an audience of millions. This time it ’s Bill Maherwho last week hosted Jay Gordon, a controversial doctor who peddles misinformation about vaccines and is best known for providing hundreds of personal belief exemptions for families to forgo school vaccine requirements.The 14-minute interview on Real Time with Bill Maher doubled down on all the dangerous views we ’ve heard before: highlighting discredited work on vaccines and autism, disingenuously labelling measles a benign illness, and questioning a vaccine schedule that has been proven safe and effective by decades of research.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Health Health policy Science Politics Media Source Type: news

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Physicians repeat it over and over: Vaccines like the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine do not cause autism; they are safe and effective. Yet the decades-old false claim that vaccines do cause autism has convinced millions of parents not to give their children potentially lifesaving shots and could lead more to opt out, according to Texas physicians.
Source: TMA News Room - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
As families face back-to-school medical requirements this month, the country feels the impact of a vaccine resistance movement decades in the making.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: your-feed-science Vaccination and Immunization Smallpox Whooping Cough Children and Childhood Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Measles Parenting Autism Medicine and Health Babies and Infants Doctors Rumors and Misinformation Centers fo Source Type: news
(This post has been updated with relevant recent information.) The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. But we may be at risk for joining the UK Greece, Albania, and the Czech Republic, four countries recently stripped of measles elimination status by the World Health Organization. Since the beginning of 2019, more than 1,234 measles cases have been reported in 31 states, with active outbreaks in upstate New York and El Paso, Texas. New York has just declared the end of its yearlong outbreak, which required a massive public health response to control. Minnesota had a major measles outb...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
Religious exemptions for vaccinations are no longer available. With the start of the school year, some parents face a reckoning.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Freedom of Religion Children and Childhood Education (K-12) Vaccination and Immunization Measles Autism Home Schooling Hotez, Peter J Zucker, Howard A New York City Source Type: news
PMID: 31476225 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
We are in the midst of a measles epidemic. As of July 25th, more than 1,100 cases have been reported in 30 states since the beginning of the year. That’s the highest number since 1992 — and since measles was declared eliminated in 2000. Given that measles is extremely contagious — the virus can linger in rooms even after a sick person has left — and can lead to serious complications, this is really alarming. There is a simple way to help: get more people immunized. How many children receive vaccines? Most children in the US are immunized. Only a little more than 1% of children have no immunizations....
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Recent measles epidemics in US and European cities where vaccination coverage has declined are providing a harsh reminder for the need to maintain protective levels of immunity across the entire population. Vaccine uptake rates have been declining in large part because of public misinformation regarding a possible association between measles vaccination and autism for which there is no scientific basis. The purpose of this article is to address a new misinformed antivaccination argument —that measles immunity is undesirable because measles virus is protective against cancer.
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Special article Source Type: research
Recently, one of the students whom I was precepting at my primary care site stated “we didn't learn much about the measles.” To which I replied, “no, we haven't talked much about the measles.” Certainly, the students had memorized the standard immunization schedule and were aware of the thoroughly debunked theory linking the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism, b ut they needed a refresher on the presenting signs and symptoms of the extremely contagious viral infection and how to educate their patients and families.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Health Care - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Data from a federal program designed to compensate people harmed by vaccines shows how rare it is for someone to claim they were hurt after getting vaccinated.
Source: NYT - Category: American Health Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Tetanus Measles Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Autism Medicine and Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program Health and Human Services Department your-feed-health Source Type: news
Christina Hildebrand went down a rabbit hole and emerged at the statehouse in Sacramento. That’s how she describes it–going down a rabbit hole–and in her case it happened 14 years ago, when she was pregnant with her first child. In a world filled with chemicals and toxins, processed foods and GMOs, she decided her baby would be brought up as naturally and chemical-free as possible. It was when she was researching how best to achieve that goal that she bumped into vaccines. That was a bad time to begin thinking about such things. The fraudulent 1998 paper by British physician Andrew Wakefield ostensibly li...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized vaccines Source Type: news
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