Lack of placental steroid hormone may increase risk of autism

Low levels of placental hormone, alloprenanolone, may affect foetal brain development and increase autism risk, according to research presented at the Neuroscience 2019 annual meeting in Chicago.New Atlas 
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 11 November 2019Source: Neuroimaging Clinics of North AmericaAuthor(s): Jessica B. Girault, Joseph Piven
Source: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 November 2019Source: Social Science &MedicineAuthor(s): Pernille Skovbo Rasmussen, Inge Kryger Pedersen, Anne Katrine PagsbergAbstractCurrently, we are witnessing a precipitous rise in autism diagnoses among children, and several bodies of sociological research are attempting to explain this development. However, the experiences within parental contexts have been inadequately examined; that is, how parents feel about and act upon the awareness of their child's autism diagnosis. Drawing upon a qualitative study among Danish parents of 20 children recently diagnosed with autism, this...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Source: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment Source Type: research
On December 11, 2019, the National Center for Mobility Management and the Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, are providing a free webinar on transportation and mobility services for youth with autism transitioning out of high school.
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: news
In this study we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to (1) assess potential group differences between typically developing (TD) and ASD participants in motor cortical oscillatory activity observed on a simple button-press task and (2) to do so over a sufficiently broad age-range so as to capture age-dependent changes associated with development. Event-related desynchronization was evaluated in Mu (8–13 Hz) and Beta (15–30 Hz) frequency bands (Mu-ERD, Beta-ERD). In addition, post-movement Beta rebound (PMBR), and movement-related gamma (60–90 Hz) synchrony (MRGS) were also assessed in a cohort of 123 ...
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This report condemns the'horrific reality'of conditions and treatment under which many young people with learning disabilities and autism are detained in mental health hospitals,'inflicting terrible suffering on those detained and causing anguish to their distraught families'. It calls for an overhaul of inspections and changes to the Mental Health Act to protect those detained and for the establishment of a Number 10 unit with Cabinet-level leadership to urgently drive forward reform.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This paper examines how the symptomology of the small number of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) charged with online sexual offenses in Australia is established during legal arguments and conceived by the judiciary to impact legal liability ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
MPs have condemned the “horrific reality”' of conditions and treatment under which many young people with learning disabilities and autism are detained in mental health hospitals.
Source: NHS Networks - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Many parents have tried putting their autistic children on gluten-free diets, in the hope that it would improve their symptoms. A new study finds that gluten-free diets have no effect on autism.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Many parents have tried putting their autistic children on gluten-free diets, in the hope that it would improve their symptoms. A new study finds that gluten-free diets have no effect on autism.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
More News: Autism | Brain | Endocrinology | Hormones | Neurology