Do High-Dose Statins Increase the Risk for Osteoporosis? Do High-Dose Statins Increase the Risk for Osteoporosis?

First study of its kind to show that although low doses of statins appear protective of bone health, high doses may increase risk for osteoporosis.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - Category: Radiology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe characteristics of patients starting oral bisphosphonate therapy have changed over time. Consideration must be given to these time trends when designing studies that examine osteoporosis drug effects.
Source: Osteoporosis International - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Conclusion Figure 4 shows that the 27 different molecular defects within the ALB so far reported to cause CAA are located in ten different exons (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12) and in seven different introns (1, 2, 3, 6, 10, 11, and 12) (The Albumin Website, 2018; Caridi et al., 2019). Variations in the last two coding exons (13 and 14) would probably cause the presence of a circulating C-terminal variant of the protein and not CAA. The first twelve exons of ALB, with the exception of the two shortest, exons 2 and 6, were reported to contain at least one molecular defect resulting in CAA (The Albumin Website, 2018; ...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Influence of Habitual Physical Behavior – Sleeping, Sedentarism, Physical Activity – On Bone Health in Community-Dwelling Older People Gladys Onambele-Pearson1*, Jorgen Wullems1,2, Conor Doody1, Declan Ryan1,3, Christopher Morse1 and Hans Degens4,5,6 1Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom 2Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 3Faculty of Health and Society, University of Northampton, Northampton, United Kingdom 4School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom 5In...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Kobayashi Y, Banno K, Kunitomi H, Tominaga E, Aoki D Abstract Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer and the eighth most common cause of cancer mortality in women. Although standard chemotherapy is the established treatment for ovarian cancer, the prognosis remains poor, and it is highly anticipated that new drugs will be developed. New drugs, such as humanized anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibodies and poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors, are expected to improve clinical outcomes of ovarian cancer. However, long-term, costly research is required to develop such new drugs...
Source: Journal of Gynecologic Oncology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
ConclusionsAllo-HCT survivors are at relevant risk of endocrinopathies after transplantation, providing justification for specific monitoring to individualize treatment and follow-up. Of note, classical transplant-related variables are not enough to justify the occurrence of endocrinological disfunction: a further deeper evaluation of a misdiagnosed donor-mediated autoimmune predisposition will be essential.DisclosuresBonini: Intellia Therapeutics: Research Funding.
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 723. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation: Late Complications and Approaches to Disease Recurrence: Poster III Source Type: research
Could daily doses of statins help prevent osteoporosis and bone fractures after a stroke?Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &Metabolism
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news
In this study, we found that TXNIP deficiency induces accelerated senescent phenotypes of mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells under high glucose condition and that the induction of cellular ROS or AKT activation is critical for cellular senescence. Our results also revealed that TXNIP inhibits AKT activity by a direct interaction, which is upregulated by high glucose and H2O2 treatment. In addition, TXNIP knockout mice exhibited an increase in glucose uptake and aging-associated phenotypes including a decrease in energy metabolism and induction of cellular senescence and aging-associated gene expression. We propose that...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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