Association Between Sepsis and Microvascular Brain Injury*

Conclusions: Sepsis was specifically associated with moderate to severe vascular brain injury as assessed by microvascular infarcts. This association was stronger for microinfarcts within the cerebral cortex, with those who experienced severe sepsis hospitalization being more than twice as likely to have evidence of moderate to severe cerebral cortical injury in adjusted analyses. Further study to identify mechanisms for the association of sepsis and microinfarcts is needed.
Source: Critical Care Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Clinical Investigations Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 20 November 2019Source: NeuroImage: ClinicalAuthor(s): Lei Gao, Tao Wang, Tianyi Qian, Feng Xiao, Lijun Bai, Junjian Zhang, Haibo XuAbstractSevere (> 70% narrowing) asymptomatic carotid stenosis (SACS) is associated with cognitive impairment and future strokes, and connectivity basis for the remote brain consequences is poorly understood. Here we explored homotopic connectivity and parenchymal lesions measured by multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters in patients with SACS. Twenty-four patients with SACS (19 males/ 5 females; 64.25 ± 7.18 years), 24 comorbidities...
Source: NeuroImage: Clinical - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Authors: Zhang W, Low LF, Schwenk M, Mills N, Gwynn JD, Clemson L Abstract BACKGROUND: Older people with cognitive impairment are at increased risk of falls; however, fall prevention strategies have limited success in this population. The aim of this paper is to review the literature to inform a theoretical framework for fall prevention in older adults with dementia. SUMMARY: A narrative review was conducted on fall risk factors in people with cognitive impairment, the relationship between cognition and gait, and their joint impact on the risk of falls. This was used to develop a theoretical framework for fall ...
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: BPMSE has a limited predictive value for the variables studied. PMID: 31739306 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research
This study explored the effect of a nurse-led cognitive behavioral intervention on depressive symptoms and coping strategies among family caregivers of PWD in China. Methods This randomized controlled trial used data from a sample of 112 caregivers screened from 276 potential participants in a city in southeastern China. The sample was randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 56) and a control group (n = 56). The intervention group received five monthly in-home, nurse-led cognitive behavioral sessions and telephone consultations after each session. The control group received five monthly, short, general conversat...
Source: Journal of Nursing Research - Category: Nursing Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
Conditions:   Age-related Cognitive Decline;   Mild Cognitive Impairment;   Dementia Interventions:   Behavioral: Cognitive Training;   Behavioral: Computerized Cognitive Stimulation Sponsors:   University of South Florida;   University of Florida;   University of California, San Francisco;   University of Minnesota;   National Institute on Aging (NIA) Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Funding Opportunity RFA-NS-20-012 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This initiative will provide two years of support for planning activities necessary for initiating a Phase III clinical trial designed to validate VCID biomarkers and/or treat patients with VCID. The full spectrum of VCID is in scope, and the one or more VCID disorders(s) to be targeted in the trial must be clearly specified in the application, for example (but not limited to): vascular insults including clinical stroke, silent infarcts and microinfarcts, leukoaraiosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), transient ischemic attack (TIA), micro-b...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
On 28 October 2019,  Patricia Downes (née Anderson) FRPharmS, aged 89, of Pocklington, York. Dr Downes registered with the Society in 1952.  Donations in Dr Downes’ memory may be made to Dementia UK at: https://www.dementiauk.org/get-involved/donate/ways-to-donate-in-memory  
Source: The Pharmaceutical Journal - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news
It is well established that exercise and physical fitness correlate well with reduced incidence of all of the common age-related diseases, and reduced mortality risk. It is hard to establish causation from the contents of human epidemiological databases, but the analogous animal studies convincingly demonstrate that exercise improves health. There is no reason to expect humans to be all that different in this matter. Here, researchers show that, much as expected, greater fitness correlates with reduced risk of dementia. Of note, patients that improved their fitness over the years of later life exhibited reduced disease ris...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
DEMENTIA, in particular Alzheimer ’s disease, effects 850,000 people in the UK. This figure is set to rise to two million by 2015. There is currently no cure for dementia, however, a new study has suggested Alzheimer’s disease could be predicted by a brain scan decades before symptoms develop.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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