Acupuncture for Pain.

Acupuncture for Pain. Am Fam Physician. 2019 Jul 15;100(2):89-96 Authors: Kelly RB, Willis J Abstract Acupuncture has been increasingly used as an integrative or complementary therapy for pain. It is well-tolerated with little risk of serious adverse effects. Traditional acupuncture and nontraditional techniques, such as electroacupuncture and dry needling, often result in reported pain improvement. Multiple factors may contribute to variability in acupuncture's therapeutic effects, including needling technique, number of needles used, duration of needle retention, acupuncture point specificity, number of treatments, and numerous subjective (psychological) factors. Controlled trials have been published on pain syndromes, such as acupuncture for acute and chronic low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, headache, myofascial pain, neck pain, and fibromyalgia. For some conditions, enough data are available for systematic evaluations or meta-analyses. Acupuncture may provide modest benefits in the treatment of chronic low back pain, tension headache and chronic headache, migraine headache prophylaxis, and myofascial pain. Although patients receiving acupuncture for acute low back pain and knee osteoarthritis report less pain, the improvement with true (verum) acupuncture over sham acupuncture is not clinically significant for these conditions. These two conditions illustrate a recurring pattern in acupuncture trials, in which the additional improvement that can b...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research

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The objectives of this article are the following: 1) to examine fibromyalgia and somatic symptom disorder analogy. 2) to discuss stress-evoked neuropathic pain sexual dimorphism, and 3) to propose a neuropathic pathogenesis that may explain how stressed women could develop fibromyalgia. Recent research demonstrates a clear link between fibromyalgia and small fibre neuropathy. Dorsal root ganglia contain the small nerve fibre nuclei. In rodents, physical, chemical, or environmental stressors lead to dorsal root ganglia phenotypic changes and to hyperalgesia. This phenomenon is much more frequent in females. Prolactin, oestr...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: van Campen C(MC, Rowe PC, Verheugt FWA, Visser FC Abstract OBJECTIVES: Muscle pain and fibromyalgia (FM) are common among individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We recently demonstrated that during orthostatic stress testing, adults with ME/CFS reported increased pain. In the current study, we hypothesised that pain pressure thresholds (PPT) would decrease and temporal summation (windup) would increase after head-up tilt testing (HUT), and that the presence of co-morbid FM would be associated with greater change in both measures. METHODS: We studied adult ME/CFS p...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Discussion: The use of biologic agents did not increase in this interval, but it is higher than in an earlier assessment of the NAMCS. Nearly all systemic immunomodulators are prescribed by dermatologists. The ambulatory uptake of these agents did not alter the use of other treatment modalities within this timeframe. PMID: 32940551 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Dermatological Treatment - Category: Dermatology Tags: J Dermatolog Treat Source Type: research
Conclusions: The use of the standardized MIST tool for EMS to hospital patient handoff was associated with a mixed value on inpatient documentation of prehospital events. After MIST implementation, agreement was higher for mechanism and location of injury and lower for vital signs and treatments. Further research can advance the prehospital to treatment facility handoff process. PMID: 32940577 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Prehospital Emergency Care - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Prehosp Emerg Care Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 September 2020Source: Joint Bone SpineAuthor(s): Christian Hubert Roux, Joël Coste, Coralie Roger, Eric Fontas, Anne-Christine Rat, Francis Guillemin
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Authors: Fernández-Carvajal A, González-Muñiz R, Fernández-Ballester G, Ferrer-Montiel A Abstract INTRODUCTION: . Thermo transient receptor potential (thermoTRP) channels are some of the most intensely pursued therapeutic targets of the past decade. They are considered promising targets of numerous diseases including chronic pain and cancer. Modulators of these proteins, in particular TRPV1-4, TRPM8 and TRPA1, have reached clinical development, but none have been approved for clinical practice yet. AREAS COVERED: . The therapeutic potential of targeting thermoTRP channels is discusse...
Source: Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Investig Drugs Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2020Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, Volume 46Author(s): Mia T. Minen, Kathryn B. Schaubhut, Kaitlyn Morio
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Authors: Borisovskaya A, Chmelik E, Karnik A Abstract In this chapter, we describe the impact and etiology of chronic pain, the associated changes in the nervous system, and the mechanisms by which exercise may be able to affect and reverse these changes. Evidence for efficacy of exercise in different conditions associated with chronic pain is presented, with focus on chronic low back pain, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and migraines. While the efficacy of exercise and level of evidence supporting it vary in different diseases, exercise has direct and indirect benefits for most patients suffer...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Over the past few years I’ve been pondering the presumed gap between people living with pain and the people who “treat” or work with them.  Most of my readers will know that I live with widespread pain (aka fibromyalgia) or pain that is present in many parts of my body, and the associated other symptoms like DOMS that last for weeks not a day or two, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, pressure, chilli, sound and so on. I first “came out” with my pain about 15 years ago: that is, I first disclosed to people I worked with that I had this weird ongoing pain – and finally joined...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Professional topics Research Therapeutic approaches inclusion inequality Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 23 May 2015 Source:Best Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology Author(s): Daniel J. Clauw Until recently, most clinicians considered chronic pain to be typically due to ongoing peripheral nociceptive input (i.e., damage or inflammation) in the region of the body where the individual is experiencing pain. Clinicians are generally aware of a few types of pain (e.g., headache and phantom limb pain) where chronic pain is not due to such causes, but most do not realize there is not a single chronic pain state where any radiographic, surgical, or pathological description of peripheral ...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
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