Recommendations for vaccination against ROTAvirus in PREMature newborns (ROTAPREM).

[Recommendations for vaccination against ROTAvirus in PREMature newborns (ROTAPREM)]. An Pediatr (Barc). 2019 Jul 06;: Authors: Álvarez Aldeán J, Ares Segura S, Díaz González C, Montesdeoca Melián A, García Sánchez R, Boix Alonso H, Moreno-Pérez D, en representación de la Sociedad Española de Neonatología (SENeo) y del Comité Asesor de Vacunas de la Asociación Española de Pediatría (CAV-AEP) Abstract Rotavirus (RV) is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis in infants worldwide. Most children are infected by RV by the age of 5years, and especially in the first 2years. Two oral attenuated vaccines against RV are licensed in industrialised countries, which have proven to be safe and effective against the disease. The main objective of these vaccines has been to reproduce the natural history of infection and protect against severe disease in the first months of life. Preterm infants are at higher risk of severe RV infection compared to full-term infants and infants with normal birth weight. Data collected on RV vaccination in preterm infants demonstrated that RV vaccines are effective and safe, compared with full-term infants, with a marginal risk of horizontal viral transmission and dissemination when vaccination is performed during hospitalisation. Preterm infants frequently require admission to hospital after the beginning of the 12th week o...
Source: Anales de Pediatria - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: An Pediatr (Barc) Source Type: research

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Purpose of review Gastroenteritis results in substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children in low-and-middle-income settings. Rotavirus and norovirus are the leading causes of viral gastroenteritis. Although introduction of rotavirus vaccines into childhood immunization programmes has reduced disease burden, vaccine effectiveness remains low in developing countries. Norovirus is replacing rotavirus as the most common cause of diarrhea hospitalization in settings where rotavirus vaccines are highly effective. Genetically determined host factors, such as expression of histo blood group antigen...
Source: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: GASTROINTESTINAL INFECTIONS: Edited by Gagandeep Kang and Eric R. Houpt Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Although the sensitivity and specificity of IC differ by brand type, generally, IC is not as sensitive as RT-PCR. Despite the VEs remain higher by IC, it looks comparable with that of RT-PCR in severe cases implying that VEs evaluated by IC against severe illness remain useful for VE-monitoring. PMID: 31451325 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Rotavirus vaccination has substantially reduced the incidence of rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis (RVGE) in high-income countries, but vaccine impact and estimated effectiveness are lower in low-income countries for reasons that are poorly understood. We used mathematical modeling to quantify rotavirus vaccine impact and investigate reduced vaccine effectiveness, particularly during the second year of life, in Malawi, where vaccination was introduced in October 2012 with doses at 6 and 10 weeks. We fitted models to 12 years of prevaccination data and validated the models against postvaccination data to evaluate the mag...
Source: Science Translational Medicine - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Research Articles Source Type: research
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Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
by Joseph A. Lewnard, Benjamin A. Lopman, Umesh D. Parashar, Aisleen Bennett, Naor Bar-Zeev, Nigel A. Cunliffe, Prasanna Samuel, M. Lourdes Guerrero, Guillermo Ruiz-Palacios, Gagandeep Kang, Virginia E. Pitzer Cohort studies, randomized trials, and post-licensure studies have reported reduced natural and vaccine-derived protection against rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in low- and middle-income countries. While susceptibility of children to rotavirus is known to vary within and between settings, impli cations for estimation of immune protection are not well understood. We sought to re-estimate naturally-acquired protect...
Source: PLoS Computational Biology - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
Condition:   Rotavirus Infection of Children Interventions:   Biological: TV P2-VP8;   Biological: Rotarix Sponsors:   PATH;   Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation;   SK Bioscience Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 2321: Seasonality of Rotavirus Hospitalizations at Costa Rica’s National Children’s Hospital in 2010–2015 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph16132321 Authors: Katarina Ureña-Castro Silvia Ávila Mariela Gutierrez Elena N. Naumova Rolando Ulloa-Gutierrez Alfredo Mora-Guevara Rotavirus is a leading cause of acute diarrhea in children worldwide. Costa Rica recently started universal rotavirus vaccinations for infants with a two-dose schedule in February 2019. We aimed to study the seasonality of rotavirus ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
i A Abstract The aim of the present study was to report the molecular characterization of human group A rotaviruses (RVAs) circulating in Tunisia. Stool specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age who had been hospitalized or were consulting for gastroenteritis in Tunisian hospitals between 2015 and 2017. All samples were screened by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of the VP6 gene specific for RVA. RVA-positive samples were further analysed for G/P genotyping by semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR. Among 454 tested samples, 72 (15.8 %) were positive for RVA. G1...
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract Before the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in the United States in 2006, rotavirus infection was the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis among U.S. children (1). To evaluate the long-term impact of rotavirus vaccination on disease prevalence and seasonality in the United States, CDC analyzed national laboratory testing data for rotavirus from laboratories participating in CDC's National Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Surveillance System (NREVSS) during the prevaccine (2000-2006) and postvaccine (2007-2018) periods. Nationally, the median annual percentage of tests positive for rotavirus declined fr...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
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