Standing Frame Program Can Up Motor Function in Progressive MS

FRIDAY, July 12, 2019 -- For patients with severe progressive multiple sclerosis, a standing frame program can increase motor function, according to a study published in the August issue of The Lancet Neurology. Jennifer Freeman, Ph.D., from the...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

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ConclusionOlder age at onset and presence of clinical and/or radiological disease activity correlated with accelerated disability progression in this cohort of PPMS patients.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Journal of Clinical NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Antonia Ceccarelli, Victoria Mifsud, Eslam Abusamra, Syed Irteza HussainAbstractIn clinical trials, Fingolimod was an efficacious and safe treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite this, few studies have explored its real-world efficacy and safety in the Middle East. The aim of this study was to describe our clinical experience with Fingolimod at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi in Emirati patients with MS. We retrospectively collected clinical and brain and spinal cord MRI activity over time in 30 Emirati MS patients [F/MÔ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Journal of PhysiotherapyAuthor(s): Prudence Plummer
Source: Journal of Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Source Type: research
Commentary on: "Calling Out MS Fatigue: Feasibility and Preliminary Effects of a Pilot Randomized Telephone-Delivered Exercise Intervention for Multiple Sclerosis Fatigue". J Neurol Phys Ther. 2020 Jan;44(1):32-33 Authors: Backus D, Berry A PMID: 31834218 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: J Neurol Phys Ther Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
This study initiated the first steps by assessing the associations between aspects of resiliency and intimacy-related illness intrusiveness in males with multiple sclerosis, and whether they could mediate the latter ’s relationship with depression. Primarily recruited through the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis Registry, 156 males with multiple sclerosis were included. A subscale from the Illness Intrusiveness Rating Scale (IIRS) measured intimacy-related illness intrusiveness. Resilie ncy was measured with the Multiple Sclerosis Resiliency Scale (MSRS). Correlations were run between the IIRS ...
Source: Sexuality and Disability - Category: Disability Source Type: research
Conclusions: In patients discontinuing natalizumab, fingolimod has a favorable benefit–risk profile over 48 months. These findings also suggest using a short washout following natalizumab discontinuation, consistent with guidelines and current clinical practice in Germany.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): N.B. Teixeira, M.B. Sant'Anna, A.C. Giardini, L.P. Araujo, L.A. Fonseca, A.S. Basso, Y. Cury, G. PicoloAbstractMultiple sclerosis (MS) is a Central Nervous System inflammatory demyelinating disease that has as primary symptoms losses of sensory and motor functions, including chronic pain. To date, however, few studies have investigated the mechanisms of chronic pain in animal models of MS since locomotor impairments render difficult its evaluation. It was previously demonstrated that in the MOG35-55-induced EAE, an animal mod...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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