Meal patterns after bariatric surgery in mice and rats.

Meal patterns after bariatric surgery in mice and rats. Appetite. 2019 Jun 29;:104340 Authors: Shah H, Shin AC Abstract With behavioral and pharmacological interventions continuously failing to tackle the obesity epidemic, bariatric surgery has been hailed as the most effective treatment strategy. Current literature suggests that bariatric surgery successfully decreases body weight and excess fat mass through targeting both variables of the energy homeostasis - energy intake and energy expenditure. Here we review current knowledge on changes in caloric consumption, an important arm in the energy balance equation, in rodent models of bariatric surgery. In particular, circadian feeding dynamics, post-surgical caloric intake at both "rapid weight loss" phase and "weight maintenance" phase, as well as meal pattern analysis will be the subject of this review. Considering that different types of bariatric surgery may trigger differential energy intake dynamics resulting in variable weight loss outcomes, the effects of most popular surgeries - vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and gastric banding (GB) - are elaborated. Potential candidate mechanisms underlying alterations in food intake and meal patterns following different bariatric procedures are briefly discussed at the end. PMID: 31265857 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Appetite - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Appetite Source Type: research

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ConclusionThe outcomes of bariatric surgery in geriatric patients in this study were similar to that in adults. Our study confirms the findings of previous published studies that bariatric surgery could be a safe and effective treatment option in a selected geriatric population.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Background: With the increase in life expectancy together with the obesity epidemic, there has been an increase in older patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There are conflicting opinions regarding the safety of performing bariatric procedures on older patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the safety of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass (RYGB) for older patients.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Background: With the increase in life expectancy together with the obesity epidemic, there has been an increase in older patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There are conflicting opinions regarding the safety of performing bariatric procedures on older patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the safety of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass (RYGB) for older patients.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Obesity and metabolic syndrome are closely related and both are modern diseases in epidemic states. Bariatric surgery is proven to be the most effective method to treat obesity and resolve the associated metabolic syndrome [1]. We have witnessed the rising of sleeve gastrectomy and replacing gastric bypass as the leading bariatric surgery overnight. The reason was that sleeve gastrectomy is a relative technical easier procedure comparing to gastric bypass, with similar efficacy in weight loss but less surgical complication and nutritional deficiencies.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Invited Comment Source Type: research
As obesity reaches epidemic proportions among adults in the United States, adolescents have not been spared [1, 2]. Lifestyle modification alone remains largely ineffective for meaningful weight loss and so it is important to consider bariatric surgery as a treatment option for adolescents as the evidence for safety and efficacy among this patient population has grown over the past two decades [3 –5]. However, deciding which procedure to perform can be challenging. The most common procedures (sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding) are quite different with respect to outcomes in adults [6, 7].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Obesity and metabolic syndrome are closely related, and both are modern diseases in epidemic states. Bariatric surgery is proven to be the most effective method to treat obesity and resolve the associated metabolic syndrome [1]. We have witnessed the rise of sleeve gastrectomy and its replacement of gastric bypass as the leading bariatric surgery overnight. The reason is that sleeve gastrectomy is a relatively easier technical procedure compared with gastric bypass, with similar efficacy in weight loss but fewer surgical complications and nutritional deficiencies.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Comment Source Type: research
AbstractThe worldwide obesity epidemic continues unabated, adversely impacting upon global health and economies. People with severe obesity suffer the greatest adverse health consequences with reduced life expectancy. Currently, bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for people with severe obesity, resulting in marked sustained weight loss, improved obesity-associated comorbidities and reduced mortality. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), the most common bariatric procedures undertaken globally, engender weight loss and metabolic improvements by mechanisms other than restriction and mal...
Source: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
The proportion of the population older than 60 years is increasing in the United States and Europe [1]. Obesity is a growing epidemic that affects those of all ages. The incidence of obesity in the elderly population increased in the past several years [2]. Bariatric surgery has been the most effective treatment for morbid obesity in all age groups and is considered to be superior to medical treatment in terms of weight loss and resolution of comorbidities [3]. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) are the most widely performed bariatric operations [4,5].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL STUDY Source Type: research
Purpose of review The growing obesity epidemic is associated with an increased demand for bariatric surgery with Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy as the most widely performed procedures. Despite beneficial consequences, nutritional complications may arise because of anatomical and physiological changes of the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the recent additions to our understanding of the impact of bariatric surgery on the intake, digestion and absorption of dietary protein. Recent findings After bariatric surgery, protein intake is compromised because of re...
Source: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care - Category: Nutrition Tags: PROTEIN, AMINO ACID METABOLISM AND THERAPY: Edited by Rajavel Elango and Alessandro Laviano Source Type: research
Authors: Torres-Landa S, Kannan U, Guajardo I, Pickett-Blakely OE, Dempsey DT, Williams NN, Dumon KR Abstract Obesity is a spreading epidemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality with a prevalence of over 36% worldwide. In the face of a growing epidemic, increasing medical costs, and the disappointing limitations of medical and lifestyle modification bariatric surgery was found to consistently lead to significant weight loss and improvement in obesity-associated comorbidities when compared to non-surgical interventions. Bariatric procedures fall within three basic categories: restrictive procedures, ...
Source: Minerva Chirurgica - Category: Surgery Tags: Minerva Chir Source Type: research
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