Chicago biotech sues Third Rock, bluebird bio CEO over gene therapy license

A Chicago biotech claims in a new lawsuit that Cambridge venture capital firm Third Rock Ventures and bluebird bio CEO Nick Leschly worked to hinder its drug development efforts so it could more easily obtain a key part of its intellectual property. Errant Gene Therapeutics is suing Third Rock Ventures and Leschly three years after it sued New York-based Sloan Kettering Memorial Cancer Center over a stalled rare disease trial. In the lawsuit, filed on Friday in Suffolk County Superior Court, Errant…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news

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A Chicago biotech claims in a new lawsuit that Cambridge venture capital firm Third Rock Ventures and bluebird bio CEO Nick Leschly worked to hinder its drug development efforts so it could more easily obtain a key part of its intellectual property. Errant Gene Therapeutics is suing Third Rock Ventures and Leschly three years after it sued New York-based Sloan Kettering Memorial Cancer Center over a stalled rare disease trial. In the lawsuit, filed on Friday in Suffolk County Superior Court, Errant…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news
Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
The National Cancer Institute awarded a five-year, $10.7 million grant to the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania to develop CAR T-cell therapy for mesothelioma and lung cancer. The hopes are high for a breakthrough. The program involves a laboratory modification of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — that prompts the immune system to attack cancer cells. The therapy also is known as chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy. It already is revolutionizing the way some blood and bone marrow cancers are treated. The grant is designed to investigate whether this type of gen...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
We describe phenomena using science, which gives us a sense of understanding and structure – yet we often lack actual understanding about what we’re observing, or why our treatments work. We have scientific explanations that may appear solid at first glance, but are flimsy upon closer inspection. More commonly, I imagine, we rely on scientific explanations as heuristics to enable us to get through our days, as a scaffold upon which to organize our information. I suspect AI is viscerally uncomfortable, and challenging to apply to clinical care or drug discovery (see part 2), because of the psychological importan...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Pharmaceuticals Physicians AI David Shaywitz Health Tech Source Type: blogs
We are in a wondrous age of medicine where CURES for certain types of cancer, rare diseases, blindness and other scourges are imminent. We now need to figure out how to pay for them.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tags: NASDAQ:AVXS NYSE:NVS Source Type: news
“I’m a medical student. Which specialty should I choose and what skills will a future doctor need?” “I’m in radiology. Looking at the recent advancements in medical technology, was it a wise choice or should I train myself in something different, too?” These are the questions I most frequently receive after my keynote speeches. While all should be aware of their own physical and intellectual capabilities, here are a few pieces of advice which skills to concentrate on based on the current and future trends in healthcare. The most significant trends in healthcare Artificial intelligence, w...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Education Medical Professionals capabilities crowdsourcing digital digital health digital literacy gamification Healthcare Innovation medical specialties medical specialty patient design skills tech Source Type: blogs
In this report, we propose that the molecular mechanisms of beneficial actions of CR should be classified and discussed according to whether they operate under rich or insufficient energy resource conditions. Future studies of the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of CR should also consider the extent to which the signals/factors involved contribute to the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and other CR actions in each tissue or organ, and thereby lead to anti-aging and prolongevity. RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
New drugs and gene therapies designed to treat cancer, rare diseases, etc. are justifiably commanding high prices. However, if they don ’t work, payments shouldn’t be required.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tags: NYSE:NVS NASDAQ:AMGN Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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