The role of gender in shame, hostility, and aggression experienced by caregivers for patients with dementia - Avdikou K, Stefanatos C, Tsatali M, Gouva M, Tsolaki M.

The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between male and female caregivers for patients with dementia in the way they experience various psychosocial parameters such as shame, hostility, and aggression. The sample included 55 caregivers of...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conditions:   Early Onset Alzheimer Disease;   Frontotemporal Dementia Intervention:   Device: RHAPSODY online program and MEET online sessions Sponsors:   Technische Universität München;   University of Melbourne Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Photo credit Claudia When a beloved elder dies, we may have varying reactions, frequently changing moment by moment. Naturally, there's grief and the realization that we've seen the last of our loved one's physical presence. Often, however, if the death follows a long illness or significant pain, we can also feel a sense of relief that their suffering is over and we can get on with healing. It's often the in-between time - the caregiving years - that are the most difficult to label. Read the full article on HealthCentral about how the soul deep grief of dementia caregiving defies labels: Carol Bradley Bursack is the Candid...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 20 April 2019Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Camila Nascimento, Paula Villela Nunes, Roberta Diehl Rodriguez, Leonel Takada, Cláudia Kimie Suemoto, Lea Tenenholz Grinberg, Ricardo Nitrini, Beny LaferAbstractMental disorders are highly prevalent and important causes of medical burden worldwide. Co-occurrence of neurological and psychiatric symptoms are observed among mental disorders, representing a challenge for their differential diagnosis. Psychiatrists and neurologists have faced challenges in diagnosing old adults presenting beha...
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Aysha Mendes, Freelance Journalist, specialising in healthcare, psychology and nursing, looks at ways of caring for people with dementia without the use of antipsychotic drugs. PMID: 31002558 [PubMed - in process]
Source: British Journal of Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Br J Nurs Source Type: research
Photo credit Claudia Soraya Dear Carol: My mother developed vascular dementia, personality issues, and speech problems after a stroke three years ago. She lives with me, and because of her difficult personality, my daughter no longer wants to bring my grandchildren here to visit. I retired early to care for Mom but now I feel trapped. Nothing I do for her is right. I’ve suggested that she might have a better life if she moved to assisted living and, surprisingly, she isn’t resistant though I know she’ll complain about them, too, if she moves. My sisters live out of the area so they are limi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Authors: Berardo D, Mussa MV Abstract After an acute cardiac event, many patients experience emotional disturbance. This is a normal response to the event and to hospitalization, but, if not treated with emotive and social support, the symptoms can evolve, resulting in emotional and behavioural disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcome of the use of a new nursing relational tool, designed to support patients' emotional recovery. The data are the result of semi-structured narrative interviews, conducted in the intensive cardio care unit of the Mauriziano hospital of Turin and by telephone, during M...
Source: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being Source Type: research
Authors: de Castro AA, Soares FV, Pereira AF, Polisel DA, Caetano MS, Leal DHS, da Cunha EFF, Nepovimova E, Kuca K, Ramalho TC Abstract INTRODUCTION: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Clinical progress in this pathogenesis field has drawn the attention of researchers, stimulating the investigation of novel treatment methods. Current therapies that deal with cholinesterase inhibitors and/or NMDA antagonists have shown a modest symptomatic potential, increasing the need for research into more efficient therapeutics. The goal of this review is to summarize the advances in, and the potential o...
Source: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics - Category: Neurology Tags: Expert Rev Neurother Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 April 2019Source: Alzheimer's &DementiaAuthor(s): Michel Goedert
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
There was no relief from grieving my brother – until I realised an important lessonWhen my older brother Jerry became ill with Aids in the 1980s, he was working as a psychologist in New York and I was living in a small cottage in Berkeley, California, with the man who is now my husband. I would phone Jerry every evening and fly in once a month to help him clean his apartment and stock up on food, as well as to discuss his treatments with his doctors and HIV researchers. On one occasion, while he was recovering from a parasitic infection that had caused lesions in his brain and given him dementia, he took my hand and ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Death and dying Family Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news
More News: Dementia | Occupational Health | Study