Five Reasons Why Clinical Trials Fail And What Pharma is Doing To Fix It

If echo chambers, polarizing politics and solipsism sums up the world in 2018, the art of listening has become gold dust.The pharma industry appears to be bucking the trend however. When it comes to the patient voice, companies are becoming all ears, with patient insights driving internal decisions across the board.We decided to put this proposition to the test.One of pharma ’s perennial thorns is clinical trial recruitment. 86% of clinical trials do not reach recruitment targets within their specified time periods. Patients clearly have their grievances but are pharma companies truly listening? More importantly, are they doing something about it?We enlisted Dominique Hamerlijnck,EUPATI fellow and lung health advocate, to outline five reasons why pharma companies struggle to recruit patients, and then put it to Katie Mazuk, Senior Director, Global Head Investigator and Patient Engagement, Janssen.1. Come again? Most patients are quite willing to engage in clinical trials, but the information given in consent forms can be very confusing, says Hamerlijnck.“On average they are way too long and quite often they are not written at a level of language that is understandable for many patients — not all patients are health literate.”One solution she proposes is to employ specialists to give the information not only in a written format but break the information down into bite sized videos, using language that is is less technical and more patient-friendly...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

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In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, scientists screened cells from old animals to identify any RBPs that change upon aging. The screening showed that one particular protein, Pumilio2 (PUM2), was highly induced in old animals. PUM2 binds mRNA molecules containing specific recognition sites. Upon its binding, PUM2 represses the translation of the target mRNAs into proteins. Using a systems genetics approach, the researchers then identified a new mRNA target that PUM2 binds. The mRNA encodes for a protein called Mitochondrial Fission Factor (MFF), and is a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial fission - a process by which mitochondria break u...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Discussion of Mitochondrial Hormesis as an Approach to Slow Aging Cornelis (Cees) Wortel, Ichor Therapeutics Chief Medical Officer, on Rejuvenation Research and Its Engagement with the Established Regulatory System An Interview with a Programmed Aging Theorist An Interview with Reason at the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation An Interview on Mitochondrial Damage and Dysfunction in Aging An Interview with Vadim Gladyshev on Research into the Causes of Aging An Interview with Jim Mellon, and Update on Juvenescence A Lengthy Interview with Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation An Interview with Peter de Keize...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs
Korean JLK Inspection said yesterday that it launched its AIHub artificial intelligence-powered medical image diagnostics platform. The newly launched AIHub system is designed to analyze images from a number of different imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, X-ray and mammography, the Seoul-based company said. JLK Inspection claims the system can detect and monitor for more than 30 medical conditions in 14 regions of the body. The company added that the system is focused on brain diseases and conditions including ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, brain aneurysm and Alzheimer&rsqu...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Diagnostics Imaging Software / IT jlkinspection Source Type: news
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Lung cancer is the most frequent type of cancer across genders and the most common reason for cancer-related death worldwide [1]. Hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an established imaging method for the staging of patients with lung cancer [2]. Recently, the use of artificial intelligence and more specifically deep learning has produced promising results in various applications in medicine, including automated skin cancer detection [3] or automated Alzheimer disease detection based on FDG-PET data [4].
Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Lung cancer is the most frequent type of cancer across genders and the most common reason for cancer-related death worldwide [1]. Hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an established imaging method for the staging of patients with lung cancer [2]. Recently, the use of artificial intelligence and more specifically deep learning has produced promising results in various applications in medicine, including automated skin cancer detection [3] or automated Alzheimer disease detection based on FDG-PET data [4].
Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
This article, unfortunately paywalled, is interesting to note as a mark of the now increasingly energetic expansion of commercial efforts in longevity science. David Sinclair has been building a private equity company to work in many areas relevant to this present generation of commercial longevity science; while I'm not sold on his primary research interests as the basis for meaningful treatments for aging, he is diversifying considerably here, including into senolytics, the clearance of senescent cells demonstrated to produce rejuvenation in animal studies. This sort of approach to business mixes aspects of investing and...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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