Five Reasons Why Clinical Trials Fail And What Pharma is Doing To Fix It

If echo chambers, polarizing politics and solipsism sums up the world in 2018, the art of listening has become gold dust.The pharma industry appears to be bucking the trend however. When it comes to the patient voice, companies are becoming all ears, with patient insights driving internal decisions across the board.We decided to put this proposition to the test.One of pharma ’s perennial thorns is clinical trial recruitment. 86% of clinical trials do not reach recruitment targets within their specified time periods. Patients clearly have their grievances but are pharma companies truly listening? More importantly, are they doing something about it?We enlisted Dominique Hamerlijnck,EUPATI fellow and lung health advocate, to outline five reasons why pharma companies struggle to recruit patients, and then put it to Katie Mazuk, Senior Director, Global Head Investigator and Patient Engagement, Janssen.1. Come again? Most patients are quite willing to engage in clinical trials, but the information given in consent forms can be very confusing, says Hamerlijnck.“On average they are way too long and quite often they are not written at a level of language that is understandable for many patients — not all patients are health literate.”One solution she proposes is to employ specialists to give the information not only in a written format but break the information down into bite sized videos, using language that is is less technical and more patient-friendly...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

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Lung cancer is the most frequent type of cancer across genders and the most common reason for cancer-related death worldwide [1]. Hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an established imaging method for the staging of patients with lung cancer [2]. Recently, the use of artificial intelligence and more specifically deep learning has produced promising results in various applications in medicine, including automated skin cancer detection [3] or automated Alzheimer disease detection based on FDG-PET data [4].
Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
This article, unfortunately paywalled, is interesting to note as a mark of the now increasingly energetic expansion of commercial efforts in longevity science. David Sinclair has been building a private equity company to work in many areas relevant to this present generation of commercial longevity science; while I'm not sold on his primary research interests as the basis for meaningful treatments for aging, he is diversifying considerably here, including into senolytics, the clearance of senescent cells demonstrated to produce rejuvenation in animal studies. This sort of approach to business mixes aspects of investing and...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We report that the disruption of excitation-contraction coupling contributes to impaired force generation in the mouse model of Sod1 deficiency. Briefly, we found a significant reduction in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) activity as well as reduced expression of proteins involved in calcium release and force generation. Another potential factor involved in EC uncoupling in Sod1-/- mice is oxidative damage to proteins involved in the contractile response. In summary, this study provides strong support for the coupling between increased oxidative stress and disruption of cellular excitation contraction mac...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
It ’s difficult to open a newspaper nowadays without seeing an article about artificial intelligence. These column-inches spark our imaginations with heady visions of possible futures and crease our brows with concern in equal measure. But one thing you cannot escape is that AI is here now and it’s only going to become more pervasive.While fear of an unknown technology is understandable, in many ways it does a disservice to the incredible impact that AI is already having on the world around us. In the healthcare space alone, it is offering ways to fundamentally rethink clinical practice, speeding up diagnosis, ...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, senescent cell distribution and quantity in vastus lateralis muscle were examined in young human adults after a single bout of resistance exercise. To determine the effects of dietary protein availability around exercise on senescent cell quantity and macrophage infiltration of skeletal muscle, two isocaloric protein supplements (14% and 44% in calorie) were ingested before and immediately after an acute bout of resistance exercise, in a counter-balanced crossover fashion. An additional parallel trial was conducted to compare the outcome of muscle mass increment under the same dietary conditions after 12 wee...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we investigate mitochondrial energetics and mtDNA methylation in senescent cells, and evaluate the potential of humanin and MOTS-c as novel senolytics or SASP modulators that can alleviate symptoms of frailty and extend health span by targeting mitochondrial bioenergetics. Exercise versus the Hallmarks of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/06/exercise-versus-the-hallmarks-of-aging/ The paper I'll point out today walks through the ways in which exercise is known to beneficially affect the Hallmarks of Aging. The Hallmarks are a list of the significant causes of aging that I dis...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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