Menopausal hormone therapy and the risk of breast cancer by histological type and race: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and cohort studies

ConclusionsAsian HRT users had a higher risk of breast cancer than western HRT users. Both ET and EPT were significantly associated with the risk of all breast cancer histological types and ER-positive breast cancer.
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Currently, there is insufficient high-quality evidence to inform women considering HRT after treatment for endometrial cancer. The available evidence (both the single RCT and non-randomised evidence) does not suggest significant harm, if HRT is used after surgical treatment for early-stage endometrial cancer. There is no information available regarding use of HRT in higher-stage endometrial cancer (FIGO stage II and above). The use of HRT after endometrial cancer treatment should be individualised, taking account of the woman's symptoms and preferences, and the uncertainty of evidence for and against HRT use. ...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Conclusions: Decisions regarding the use of HT in women who undergo BSO after detection of a BRCA mutation must be individualized based on careful consideration of the risks and benefits. However, the risks of a subsequent cancer diagnosis appear small, particularly in regards to the benefits of treatment afforded by HT.
Source: American Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Original Articles: Breast Source Type: research
Conclusions:The available literature suggests that HT is a viable option for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. Newer trials will likely verify this assessment. If this is enough to change clinical practice, however, remains to be seen given the general fear of HT by many with prescriptive authority, and also the women in our care. Objective: Clinical trials in menopause have undergone much scrutiny over the years. This has led to significant shifts in the treatment of symptomatic menopause and a substantial impact on women. We aim to delineate the key studies contributing to this...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Clinical Corner: Invited Review Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
The pendulum has swung from one extreme to the other when it comes to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat symptoms of menopause. At first, the replacement hormones—mostly a combination of estrogen and progestin to replace what the body stops making after menopause—were seen as a panacea. Doctors thought they could not only relieve hot flashes and night sweats, but also prevent chronic aging diseases like heart problems and weakening bones. But studies then found that the supplement hormones could lead to a higher risk of breast cancer—and that they didn’t protect the heart after all. In the l...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs estrogen Hormone Therapy hormones for menopause hot flashes night sweats progestin Reproductive Health treating menopause Source Type: news
More than 100 women die of breast cancer in the U.S. every day. It's the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American women. But in my opinion, many of those women really die of a tragic medical error. Let me explain… Millions of women in the U.S. have taken Big Pharma's hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Their doctors prescribe it to try to relieve the symptoms of menopause. Like hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings and weight gain. But what the drug companies try to pass off as hormones are actually synthetic concoctions. They are fake versions of the estrogen and progesterone that your body makes ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Doctors have been adding a new tool to the arsenal of how they restore the sex lives of menopausal and post-menopausal women: the humble vibrator. With the onset of menopause, a decrease in the production of hormones causes vaginal tissue to get thinner and drier. Vaginal muscles can also atrophy, leading to painful sex ― a problem for half of all menopausal and post-menopausal women, according to the National Institutes of Health. But the solution might be as simple as a vibrating piece of silicon.  Vibrators that are used internally stimulate pelvic blood flow, which increases vaginal mois...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Risk of breast cancer in women taking combined menopausal hormone therapy is three times higher than in non-users, study finds.
Source: The Pharmaceutical Journal - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusion This study shows a link between the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone HRT and breast cancer risk, particularly among women who take the pill for a long period of time. But this is not the entire story. The study included a large cohort of women. The risk increase for combined HRT is based on only 52 of the 39,183 women taking the combined pill who developed breast cancer. Of these, only seven women had been taking the pill for more than 15 years. Therefore, the analysis was based on a very small number, which may mean the risk associations are not completely accurate....
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Older people Source Type: news
Conclusion This case-control study aimed to investigate the association between talc use and ovarian cancer. The researchers found a significant link between genital talc use and ovarian cancer – an increase in risk of a third, compared with no use. However, the study has important limitations and is not able to prove direct cause and effect. Although this was a case-control study that made use of data collected as part of an ongoing cohort study, talc use only seems to have been assessed after cancer diagnosis.  The study says that, "subjects were personally interviewed about potential ovarian cancer...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news
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