Roche Is Willing to Pay a Pretty Penny for the Rest of Foundation Medicine

Roche already owns a majority stake in Foundation Medicine, but now the Swiss company wants to buy the rest of the genomic diagnostics company, and it is willing to pay a pretty penny to do so. Roche agreed to pay $137 a share to buy the rest of Cambridge, MA-based Foundation Medicine, a $2.4 billion transaction that values the company at $5.3 billion. The offer price represents a 29% premium over Foundation Medicine's closing stock price Monday. The deal is expected to close during the second half of the year. The deal marks a turning point in Roche's relationship with Foundation Medicine, which dates back to January 2015 when Roche invested roughly $1.03 billion to acquire a majority interest in Foundation Medicine. The partnership included a broad R&D collaboration to accelerate Foundation Medicine's new product development initiatives, optimize treatments for cancer patients, and better design and understand the results of clinical trials based on molecular information, as well as a commercial collaboration aimed at expanding the global sales efforts for the company's products. Foundation Medicine develops genomic profiling assays designed to identify the molecular alterations in a patient's cancer and match them with relevant targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and clinical trials. Roche said Foundation Medicine will continue to operate as a separate and autonomous legal entity. In December 2017, Foundation Medicine scored FDA approval for a first-of-its-kind ...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news

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Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Markus Hartl* and Rainer Schneider Center of Molecular Biosciences (CMBI), Institute of Biochemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria The neuronal proteins GAP43 (neuromodulin), MARCKS, and BASP1 are highly expressed in the growth cones of nerve cells where they are involved in signal transmission and cytoskeleton organization. Although their primary structures are unrelated, these signaling proteins share several structural properties like fatty acid modification, and the presence of cationic effector domains. GAP43, MARCKS, and BASP1 bind to cell membrane phospholipids, a process reversibly regulate...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our data supports that never/ever smoker patients with small-cell lung cancer have better prognosis compared to their smoker counterparts. Further, patients with never/ever smoking history who present with small-cell lung cancer have a different mutation profile compared with smokers, including a high frequency of EGFR, MET, and SMAD4 mutations. Further studies are required to assess whether the differential mutation profile is a consequence of a diverse pathological mechanism for disease onset. Introduction Lung cancer is the most common neoplasia worldwide. Aside from the high incidence, lung cancer a...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In conclusion, CAR-T treatment combined with intratumoral delivery of poly I:C resulted in synergistic antitumor activity. We thus provide a rationale to translate this immunotherapeutic strategy to solid tumors. Introduction Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has been demonstrated to be a new way to fight malignancies. In particular, T lymphocytes engineered to express chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have shown great promise in treating hematological malignancies (1). CD19-targeted CAR-T cells have been approved by FDA to treat relapsed B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma (DLBC...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This study highlights how the use of in vitro 3D model can allow rapid screening and selection of new and safer drugs. Introduction Angiogenesis is a complex and finely regulated process that consists of the growth of new capillary blood vessels from pre-existing vessels to create communication pathways among tissues. The coordination of different activities such as endothelial cell proliferation and migration, metalloproteinase function, integrin expression and pericyte stabilization is essential for angiogenesis (Folkman, 1984). The “angiogenic switch” is “on” when the balance between pro-...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, T cells deficient in TRAF6 display enhanced T cell activation, CD28-indpendent stimulation and resistance to Treg cell-mediated suppression (176). Although TLR signaling can promote T cell resistance to Treg cells, the precise molecular mechanism remains yet to be elucidated. It is worth noting that TLR stimulation of T cells increases cytokine production (173, 177), thus future studies should delineate the effect of TLR-MyD88 signaling vs. subsequently induced cytokines in generating resistance to Treg cells. Lastly, it is also crucial to evaluate the effect of TLR signaling on regulatory T cells which also...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
erger The Hedgehog/Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (HH/GLI) signaling pathway regulates self-renewal of rare and highly malignant cancer stem cells (CSC), which have been shown to account for the initiation and maintenance of tumor growth as well as for drug resistance, metastatic spread and relapse. Efficacious therapeutic approaches targeting CSC pathways, such as HH/GLI signaling in combination with chemo, radiation or immunotherapy are, therefore, of high medical need. Pharmacological inhibition of HH/GLI pathway activity represents a promising approach to eliminate malignant CSC. Clinically approved HH/GLI path...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
AbstractThe increasing use of multiple immunomodulatory (IMD) agents for cancer therapies (e.g. antibodies targeting immune checkpoints, bispecific antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptor [CAR]-T cells), is raising questions on their potential immunogenicity and effects on treatment. In this review, we outline the mechanisms of action (MOA) of approved, antibody-based IMD agents, potentially related to their immunogenicity, and discuss the reported incidence of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) as well as their clinical relevance in patients with cancer. In addition, we discuss the impact of the administration route and potenti...
Source: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Cancers, Vol. 11, Pages 533: The Interplay of Autophagy and Tumor Microenvironment in Colorectal Cancer—Ways of Enhancing Immunotherapy Action Cancers doi: 10.3390/cancers11040533 Authors: Evangelos Koustas Panagiotis Sarantis Georgia Kyriakopoulou Athanasios G. Papavassiliou Michalis V. Karamouzis Autophagy as a primary homeostatic and catabolic process is responsible for the degradation and recycling of proteins and cellular components. The mechanism of autophagy has a crucial role in several cellular functions and its dysregulation is associated with tumorigenesis, tumor–stroma interactio...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Go online to PeerView.com/GQF860 to view the entire program with slides.In this video panel discussion, Leonard H. Calabrese, DO, and Evan J. Lipson, MD, engage in an interdisciplinary discussion of why it is important for rheumatologists to have a good grasp of immuno-oncology (IO) in general and of the unique immune-related adverse events (irAEs) associated with cancer immunotherapies in particular. They explore the new class of immune checkpoint inhibitors, how they work, in which cancer types they’re used, why and how irAEs develop, and which rheumatic irAEs can occur as part of the broad spectrum of potential ir...
Source: PeerView CME/CE Audio Podcast - Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Science, Medicine Source Type: podcasts
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