After Cancer Coping With The Instant Cancer Bond

So after you get diagnosed with cancer, it seems like everyone you know has cancer because:You have met a lot of other people going through cancer treatment while hanging out at chemo, in support groups, your oncologist's waiting room, etc. That part is kind of nice. You find out you aren't alone in this cancer business. You have an instant bond with new friends.Then you start hearing about all these other people who are diagnosed with cancer. You feel like you are supposed to be their friend too - because of that cancer bond thing again. Your cancer friends tell you about everyone they know when they are diagnosed with cancer because they have cancer and you have cancer so you can talk cancer all the time. And then it explodes, you meet and hear about more and more people with cancer and this cancer bond obligation doesn't quit. If someone you know  knows someone else with cancer, they expect you to become new best friends because you have that cancer bond so you must be alike.If let unleashed, you will become swallowed by guilt that you are supposed to be friends with cancer people everywhere. But you have to learn to control the guilt so it doesn't swallow you.I remember in college, I had thyroid cancer between my freshman and sophomore years. It was sort of an open secret - one some levels a lot of people knew I had cancer but no one talked about it. Back then cancer was evil and you were guaranteed to die soon.Early in my junior year (I think), a male student I knew...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer bonds cancer diagnosis coping friends guilt Source Type: blogs

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Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often critical for distinction between metastatic carcinomas of Mullerian organ and breast origin. Paired box family protein 8 (PAX8) has been described as a transcription factor highly specific to neoplasms derived from Mullerian organs, thyroid, and kidney. PAX8 IHC with polyclonal and monoclonal antibody reagents was performed on 27 primary and 22 metastatic breast carcinomas. Eight of 27 primary breast carcinomas (30%) were positive for PAX8 with the monoclonal antibody reagent only; 0 of 22 were polyclonal anti-PAX8 immunoreactive. Substantial numbers of metastases had positive immunoreac...
Source: Applied Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Morphology - Category: Chemistry Tags: Research Articles Source Type: research
ConclusionsOverall risk of cancer in our MS cohort did not significantly differ from the controls. However, the age at diagnosis of breast cancer was statistically significantly higher among the MS patients in comparison with a control population from the same patient pool. Further population-based larger studies spanning longer follow-up periods and longer exposure to emerging MS therapies are needed to evaluate cancer risk related to MS treatments and breast cancer risk in particular.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Remember Monty Python’s brilliant Life of Brian movie scene where the Palestinian insurgent commando, planning the abduction of Pilate’s wife in return for all the horrors they had to endure from the Roman Empire, asks the rhetorical question: what have the Romans ever done for us? With the hype and overmarketing, not to speak about the fears around A.I, we asked the same question. What has A.I. in medicine ever done for us? Well, we found at least 45 things. I have 45 responses to the pressing question on everyone’s mind who is interested in healthcare but tired of the hype or the doomsday scenarios a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine administration AI cancer diagnostics digital health digital health technology Healthcare Innovation medical medical imaging Radiology treatment Source Type: blogs
In this study, we reviewed major human studies on the health risks of radiation exposure and showed that sex-related factors may potentially influence the long-term response to radiation exposure. Available data suggest that long-term radiosensitivity in women is higher than that in men who receive a comparable dose of radiation. The report on the biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR VII) published in 2006 by the National Academy of Sciences, United States emphasized that women may be at significantly greater risk of suffering and dying from radiation-induced cancer than men exposed to the same dose of radiation....
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Antonio Lucena-Cacace1, Masayuki Umeda1, Lola E. Navas2,3 and Amancio Carnero2,3* 1Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan 2CIBERONC, ISCIII, Madrid, Spain 3Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBIS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío (HUVR), CSIC, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain Glioma Cancer Stem-Like Cells (GSCs) are a small subset of CD133+ cells with self-renewal properties and capable of initiating new tumors contributing to Glioma progression, maintenance, hierarchy, and complexity. GSCs are highly res...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings indicate that TBI differentially affects the levels of sex-steroid hormones in men and women patients. Plasma levels of testosterone could be a good candidate blood marker to predict recovery from unconsciousness after sTBI for male patients. Introduction Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide and is increasing in incidence (1). Patients with acute severe TBI (sTBI) often develop severe disorders of consciousness, i.e., coma, minimally conscious state or vegetative state. Although many patients may regain consciousness during the 1-month post-TBI p...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In conclusion, our WGCNA analysis identified candidate prognostic biomarkers for further basic and clinical researches. Introduction Breast cancer is a frequently diagnosed malignancy and the leading cause of cancer death among females around the world, accounting for 24% of cancer diagnoses and 15% of cancer deaths in females. According to Global Cancer Statistics 2018, there will be nearly 2.1 million new cases diagnosed globally, with ~62 thousand deaths. The incident rates of breast cancer increased in most developing countries during last decades, resulting from a combination of social and economic factors, incl...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Ginevra Doglioni1,2†, Sweta Parik1,2† and Sarah-Maria Fendt1,2* 1Laboratory of Cellular Metabolism and Metabolic Regulation, VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology, VIB, Leuven, Belgium 2Laboratory of Cellular Metabolism and Metabolic Regulation, Department of Oncology, KU Leuven and Leuven Cancer Institute, Leuven, Belgium Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death in cancer patients. Thus, understanding and targeting this process is an unmet need. Crucial steps during the establishment of metastases include the (pre)metastatic niche formation. This process relies on the interaction of th...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Therapeutic Targeting of Fibrotic Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition–An Outstanding Challenge Attila Fintha1, Ákos Gasparics2, László Rosivall3 and Attila Sebe3,4* 12nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary 21st Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary 3Department of Pathophysiology, International Nephrology Research and Training Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary 4Division of Medical Biotechnology, Paul Ehrlich Institute, Langen, Germany Back in 1995, a landmark paper was published, which shaped the fi...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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