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Zika's effects hard to detect on ultrasound, MRI

A new animal study published February 5 in Nature Medicine illustrates...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI advances detection of Zika-related brain abnormalities PET tracks Zika virus, disease progression in mice AIUM: NIH prepares for potential re-emergence of Zika virus Studies at RSNA offer new insights into Zika's spread
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, which can induce fetal brain injury and growth restriction following maternal infection during pregnancy. Prenatal diagnosis of ZIKV-associated fetal injury in the absence of microcephaly is challenging due to an incomplete understanding of how maternal ZIKV infection affects fetal growth and the use of different sonographic reference standards around the world. We hypothesized that skeletal growth is unaffected by ZIKV infection and that the femur length can represent an internal standard to detect growth deceleration of the fetal head and/or abdomen by ultrasound.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research: Obstetrics Source Type: research
The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) has announced its 2018...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM publishes guidance for improving ob/gyn US AIUM: Is MRI really needed after MSK ultrasound? AIUM: Machine learning may aid breast ultrasound reads AIUM: NIH prepares for potential re-emergence of Zika virus AIUM: Contrast US biopsy combo finds high-grade prostate cancer
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Nature Medicine 24, 368 (2018). doi:10.1038/nm.4485 Authors: Kristina M Adams Waldorf, Branden R Nelson, Jennifer E Stencel-Baerenwald, Colin Studholme, Raj P Kapur, Blair Armistead, Christie L Walker, Sean Merillat, Jay Vornhagen, Jennifer Tisoncik-Go, Audrey Baldessari, Michelle Coleman, Manjiri K Dighe, Dennis W W Shaw, Justin A Roby, Veronica Santana-Ufret, Erica Boldenow, Junwei Li, Xiaohu Gao, Michael A Davis, Jesica A Swanstrom, Kara Jensen, Douglas G Widman, Ralph S Baric, Joseph T Medwid, Kathryn A Hanley, Jason Ogle, G Michael Gough, Wonsok Lee, Chris English, W McIntyre Durning, Jeff Thiel, Chris Gatenby, E...
Source: Nature Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research
Conclusion The awareness campaign on zika virus had a significant impact on population’s knowledge and main practical information was correctly captured. The information did not spill excessive fear. Nevertheless, modification of individual behavior appeared harder to obtain.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Abstract The characterization of focal splenic lesions by ultrasound can be quite challenging. The recent introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has come to play a valuable role in the field of imaging splenic pathologies, offering the possibility of an ionizing radiation-free investigation. Because CEUS has been incorporated into everyday clinical practice, malignant diseases such as focal lymphomatous infiltration, metastatic deposits, benign cysts, traumatic fractures, and hemangiomas can now be accurately depicted and characterized without the need for further imaging. More specifically, splenic traumatic ...
Source: Radiologia Brasileira - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) has released guidelines...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM: Is MRI really needed after MSK ultrasound? AIUM: Machine learning may aid breast ultrasound reads AIUM: NIH prepares for potential re-emergence of Zika virus AIUM: Contrast US biopsy combo finds high-grade prostate cancer AIUM: Experience matters in US screening of dense breasts
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: In the population of women screened by this questionnaire, 5.1% traveled internationally and 39.6% traveled domestically prior to their anatomic ultrasound. Notably, Florida and Texas are common travel destinations among women at this clinic, and both have had active local transmission of Zika virus. PMID: 29357209 [PubMed - in process]
Source: WMJ - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: WMJ Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2017 Source:Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology Author(s): Mayra A. Borrero Landazabal, Aurora L. Carreño Otero, Vladimir V. Kouznetsov, Jonny E. Duque Luna, Stelia C. Mendez-Sanchez Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are responsible for dengue, chikungunya, and Zika virus transmission in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. Due to the absence of vaccines or antiviral drugs for human treatment, the majority of control strategies are targeted at Ae. aegypti elimination. Our research on mosquito control insecticidal agents has previously shown that the alkaloid girge...
Source: Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
The most recent outbreak of Zika Virus (ZIKV) began April 2015 in Brazil and has spread to the majority of countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Emerging in vitro and epidemiologic evidence has indicated a strong link between ZIKV infection in pregnancy and severe adverse effects on fetal development, some of which may be detected during obstetric ultrasound. However, it is unknown whether obstetric ultrasound services and referral networks have adequate capacity to detect and appropriately refer suspected cases of Congenital Zika Syndrome (CZS) in LAC.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: IDSOG Abstract Source Type: research
This study was based upon a small number of cases and ultrasound detection rather than births. Seven cases of microcephaly were reported above background, but only one of them was a birth; the others were detected by ultrasound. The high rate of ultrasound detection is not consistent with observations by ultrasound of microcephaly in other countries, including Colombia. We use the model for French Polynesia as a reference model for comparison with other data in order to clarify which data is or is not consistent with that model. We note that this rate is about 100 times larger than the minimum reported background rate for ...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
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