Zika's effects hard to detect on ultrasound, MRI

A new animal study published February 5 in Nature Medicine illustrates...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI advances detection of Zika-related brain abnormalities PET tracks Zika virus, disease progression in mice AIUM: NIH prepares for potential re-emergence of Zika virus Studies at RSNA offer new insights into Zika's spread
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Peer Reviewer: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia You are an ED doc working in Perth over schoolies week. An 18 yo man comes into ED complaining of fever, rash a “cracking headache” and body aches. He has just hopped off the plane from Bali where he spent the last 2 weeks partying, boozing and running amok. He got bitten by “loads” of mosquitoes because he forgot to take insect repellent. On e...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine arthralgia dengue fever rash Source Type: blogs
We read the publication on “Femur-sparing pattern of abnormal fetal growth in pregnant women from New York City after maternal Zika virus infection” with a great interest.1 Walker et al concluded that “An unusual femur-sparing pattern of fetal growth restriction was detected in the majority of fetuses with congenital Z IKV exposure. Fetal body ratios may represent a more sensitive ultrasound biomarker to detect viral injury in nonmicrocephalic fetuses that could impart long-term risk for complications of congenital ZIKV infection.”1 We would like to share ideas on this finding based on the expe...
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editors Source Type: research
Discussion: distinct neurological alterations in the monochorionic twins with an infection presumed by Zika virus may raise the hypothesis of the existence of predisposing factors or protection against this viral agent.Resumo Introdu ção: o aumento da incidência de microcefalia congênita no Brasil tem sido associado à epidemia do zika vírus. Este relato objetivou descrever o comprometimento neurológico de gêmeas monozigóticas presumidamente infectadas intra-útero pelo zika vírus durante a epidemia brasileira de 2015. Descrição do caso: ...
Source: Revista Brasileira de Saude Materno Infantil - Category: Midwifery Source Type: research
Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, which can induce fetal brain injury and growth restriction following maternal infection during pregnancy. Prenatal diagnosis of ZIKV-associated fetal injury in the absence of microcephaly is challenging due to an incomplete understanding of how maternal ZIKV infection affects fetal growth and the use of different sonographic reference standards around the world. We hypothesized that skeletal growth is unaffected by ZIKV infection and that the femur length can represent an internal standard to detect growth deceleration of the fetal head and/or abdomen by ultrasound.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research: Obstetrics Source Type: research
The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) has announced its 2018...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM publishes guidance for improving ob/gyn US AIUM: Is MRI really needed after MSK ultrasound? AIUM: Machine learning may aid breast ultrasound reads AIUM: NIH prepares for potential re-emergence of Zika virus AIUM: Contrast US biopsy combo finds high-grade prostate cancer
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Nature Medicine 24, 368 (2018). doi:10.1038/nm.4485 Authors: Kristina M Adams Waldorf, Branden R Nelson, Jennifer E Stencel-Baerenwald, Colin Studholme, Raj P Kapur, Blair Armistead, Christie L Walker, Sean Merillat, Jay Vornhagen, Jennifer Tisoncik-Go, Audrey Baldessari, Michelle Coleman, Manjiri K Dighe, Dennis W W Shaw, Justin A Roby, Veronica Santana-Ufret, Erica Boldenow, Junwei Li, Xiaohu Gao, Michael A Davis, Jesica A Swanstrom, Kara Jensen, Douglas G Widman, Ralph S Baric, Joseph T Medwid, Kathryn A Hanley, Jason Ogle, G Michael Gough, Wonsok Lee, Chris English, W McIntyre Durning, Jeff Thiel, Chris Gatenby, E...
Source: Nature Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research
Conclusion The awareness campaign on zika virus had a significant impact on population’s knowledge and main practical information was correctly captured. The information did not spill excessive fear. Nevertheless, modification of individual behavior appeared harder to obtain.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Abstract The characterization of focal splenic lesions by ultrasound can be quite challenging. The recent introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has come to play a valuable role in the field of imaging splenic pathologies, offering the possibility of an ionizing radiation-free investigation. Because CEUS has been incorporated into everyday clinical practice, malignant diseases such as focal lymphomatous infiltration, metastatic deposits, benign cysts, traumatic fractures, and hemangiomas can now be accurately depicted and characterized without the need for further imaging. More specifically, splenic traumatic ...
Source: Radiologia Brasileira - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) has released guidelines...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM: Is MRI really needed after MSK ultrasound? AIUM: Machine learning may aid breast ultrasound reads AIUM: NIH prepares for potential re-emergence of Zika virus AIUM: Contrast US biopsy combo finds high-grade prostate cancer AIUM: Experience matters in US screening of dense breasts
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: In the population of women screened by this questionnaire, 5.1% traveled internationally and 39.6% traveled domestically prior to their anatomic ultrasound. Notably, Florida and Texas are common travel destinations among women at this clinic, and both have had active local transmission of Zika virus. PMID: 29357209 [PubMed - in process]
Source: WMJ - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: WMJ Source Type: research
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