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Reproducibility of the effects of homeopathically potentised Argentum nitricum on the growth of Lemna gibba L. in a randomised and blinded bioassay.

CONCLUSIONS: With the original study design (disregarding gibbosity status of L. gibba) results of the original study could not be reproduced sensu stricto. We conclude that the growth state gibbosity is crucial for successful reproduction of the original study. Different physiological states of the test organisms used for bioassays for homeopathic basic research must carefully be considered. PMID: 28844287 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Homeopathy - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Homeopathy Source Type: research

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Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/British Columbia Source Type: news
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Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Opinion Source Type: news
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Source: DailyMed Drug Label Updates - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: alerts
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Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/British Columbia Source Type: news
Source: BMJ News - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
Whenever I think I've seen the most ridiculous quackery ever in homeopathy or naturopathy, homeopaths and naturopaths go above and beyond to prove me wrong. This time around, I learn of Lyssinum, a homeopathic remedy claimed to have been made from the saliva of a rabid dog, and how it "cured" a child of his fear of werewolves. The post Naturopathy: Using homeopathic saliva from a rabid dog to cure growling, aggression, and a fear of werewolves appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE.
Source: Respectful Insolence - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Homeopathy Medicine Naturopathy Pseudoscience Quackery Anke Zimmermann featured hydrophobium Lyssin Lyssinum miasm rabies rabies miasm Samuel Hahnemann The Golden Bough werewolf Source Type: blogs
Research by Oxford University found that doctors at one in 12 practices had used the controversial alternative therapies, costing the NHS an estimated £4 million a year.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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